Author McMeekin, Sean, 1974- author
Title The Russian Revolution : a new history / Sean McMeekin
Imprint New York, NY : Basic Books, an imprint of Perseus Books, LLC, 2017
book jacket
LOCATION CALL # STATUS OPACMSG BARCODE
 Modern History Library  947.0841 M167    AVAILABLE    30550100631082
 人文社會聯圖  DK265 .M3745 2017    AVAILABLE    30610020543922
Descript xxxi, 445 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 25 cm
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Note "In The Russian Revolution, historian Sean McMeekin traces the origins and events of the Russian Revolution, which ended Romanov rule, ushered the Bolsheviks into power, and changed the course of world history. Between 1900 and 1920, Russia underwent a complete and irreversible transformation: by the end of these two decades, a new regime was in place, the economy had collapsed, and over 20 million Russians had died during the revolution and what followed. Still, Bolshevik power remained intact due to a remarkable combination of military prowess, violent terror tactics, and the failures of their opposition. And as McMeekin shows, Russia's revolutionaries were aided at nearly every step by countries like Germany and Sweden who sought to benefit-politically and economically-from the chaotic changes overtaking the country. The first comprehensive history of these momentous events in a decade, The Russian Revolution combines cutting-edge scholarship and a fast-paced narrative to shed new light on a great turning point of the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher
"In The Russian Revolution, historian Sean McMeekin traces the origins and events of the Russian Revolution, which brought an end to Romanov rule and ushered the Bolsheviks into power. Between the dawn of the 20th century and 1920, Russia underwent a complete and irreversible transformation, the effects of which would reverberate throughout the world for decades to come. At the turn of the century, the Russian economy, which still trailed behind Britain, France, Germany, and the U.S., was growing by about 10% annually, and its population had reached 150 million. But by 1920, a new regime was in place, the country was in desperate financial straits, and between 20 and 25 million Russians had died during the Revolution and the Civil War, the Red Terror, and the economic collapse that followed. Still, Bolshevik power remained intact through a remarkable combination of military prowess, violent terror tactics, and the bumbling failures of their opposition. And as McMeekin shows, they were aided at nearly every step by countries like Germany, Sweden, and Switzerland who sought to benefit--politically and economically--from the chaotic changes overtaking the country"-- Provided by publisher
Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-420) and index
Subject Soviet Union -- History -- Revolution, 1917-1921