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Author Eberspächer, Jörg
Title GSM - Architecture, Protocols and Services : Architecture, Protocols and Services
Imprint New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2009
©2009
book jacket
Edition 3rd ed
Descript 1 online resource (340 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- GSM - Architecture, Protocols and Services Third Edition -- Contents -- Preface -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The idea of unbounded communication -- 1.2 The success of GSM -- 1.3 Classification of mobile communication systems -- 1.4 Some history and statistics of GSM -- 1.5 Overview of the book -- 2 The mobile radio channel and the cellular principle -- 2.1 Characteristics of the mobile radio channel -- 2.2 Separation of directions and duplex transmission -- 2.2.1 Frequency Division Duplex -- 2.2.2 Time Division Duplex -- 2.3 Multiple access -- 2.3.1 Frequency Division Multiple Access -- 2.3.2 Time Division Multiple Access -- 2.3.3 Code Division Multiple Access -- 2.3.4 Space Division Multiple Access -- 2.4 Cellular principle -- 2.4.1 Definitions -- 2.4.2 Carrier-to-interference ratio -- 2.4.3 Formation of clusters -- 2.4.4 Traffic capacity and traffic engineering -- 2.4.5 Sectorization of cells -- 2.4.6 Spatial filtering for interference reduction (SFIR) -- 3 System architecture and addressing -- 3.1 System architecture -- 3.2 The SIM concept -- 3.3 Addressing -- 3.3.1 International mobile station equipment identity -- 3.3.2 International mobile subscriber identity -- 3.3.3 Mobile subscriber ISDN number -- 3.3.4 Mobile station roaming number -- 3.3.5 Location area identity -- 3.3.6 Temporary mobile subscriber identity -- 3.3.7 Other identifiers -- 3.4 Registers and subscriber data -- 3.4.1 Location registers (HLR and VLR) -- 3.4.2 Security-related registers (AUC and EIR) -- 3.4.3 Subscriber data -- 3.5 Network interfaces and configurations -- 3.5.1 Interfaces -- 3.5.2 Configurations -- 4 Air interface - physical layer -- 4.1 Logical channels -- 4.1.1 Traffic channels -- 4.1.2 Signaling channels -- 4.1.3 Example: connection setup for incoming call -- 4.1.4 Bit rates, block lengths and block distances -- 4.1.5 Combinations of logical channels
4.2 Physical channels -- 4.2.1 Modulation -- 4.2.2 Multiple access, duplexing and bursts -- 4.2.3 Optional frequency hopping -- 4.2.4 Summary -- 4.3 Synchronization -- 4.3.1 Frequency and clock synchronization -- 4.3.2 Adaptive frame synchronization -- 4.4 Mapping of logical onto physical channels -- 4.4.1 26-frame multiframe -- 4.4.2 51-frame multiframe -- 4.5 Radio subsystem link control -- 4.5.1 Channel measurement -- 4.5.2 Transmission power control -- 4.5.3 Disconnection due to radio channel failure -- 4.5.4 Cell selection and operation in power conservation mode -- 4.6 Channel coding, source coding and speech processing -- 4.7 Source coding and speech processing -- 4.8 Channel coding -- 4.8.1 External error protection: block coding -- 4.8.2 Internal error protection: convolutional coding -- 4.8.3 Interleaving -- 4.8.4 Mapping onto the burst plane -- 4.8.5 Improved codecs for speech services: half-rate codec, enhanced full-rate codec and adaptive multi-rate codec -- 4.9 Power-up scenario -- 5 Protocols -- 5.1 Protocol architecture planes -- 5.2 Protocol architecture of the user plane -- 5.2.1 Speech transmission -- 5.2.2 Transparent data transmission -- 5.2.3 Nontransparent data transmission -- 5.3 Protocol architecture of the signaling plane -- 5.3.1 Overview of the signaling architecture -- 5.3.2 Transport of user data in the signaling plane -- 5.4 Signaling at the air interface (Um) -- 5.4.1 Layer 1 of the MS-BTS interface -- 5.4.2 Layer 2 signaling -- 5.4.3 Radio resource management -- 5.4.4 Mobility management -- 5.4.5 Connection management -- 5.4.6 Structured signaling procedures -- 5.4.7 Signaling procedures for supplementary services -- 5.4.8 Realization of SMS -- 5.5 Signaling at the A and Abis interfaces -- 5.6 Security-related network functions: authentication and encryption -- 5.6.1 Protection of subscriber identity
5.6.2 Verification of subscriber identity -- 5.6.3 Generating security data -- 5.6.4 Encryption of signaling and payload data -- 5.7 Signaling at the user interface -- 6 Roaming and handover -- 6.1 Mobile application part interfaces -- 6.2 Location registration and location update -- 6.3 Connection establishment and termination -- 6.3.1 Routing calls to MSs -- 6.3.2 Call establishment and corresponding MAP procedures -- 6.3.3 Call termination -- 6.3.4 MAP procedures and routing for short messages -- 6.4 Handover -- 6.4.1 Overview -- 6.4.2 Intra-MSC handover -- 6.4.3 Decision algorithm for handover timing -- 6.4.4 MAP and inter-MSC handover -- 7 Services -- 7.1 Classical GSM services -- 7.1.1 Teleservices -- 7.2 Popular GSM services: SMS and MMS -- 7.2.1 SMS -- 7.2.2 EMS -- 7.2.3 MMS -- 7.3 Overview of GSM services in Phase 2+ -- 7.4 Bearer and teleservices of GSM Phase 2+ -- 7.4.1 Advanced speech call items -- 7.4.2 New data services and higher data rates: HSCSD, GPRS and EDGE -- 7.5 Supplementary services in GSM Phase 2+ -- 7.5.1 Supplementary services for speech -- 7.5.2 Location service -- 7.6 Service platforms -- 7.6.1 CAMEL: GSM and INs -- 7.6.2 Service platforms on the terminal side -- 7.7 Wireless application protocol -- 7.7.1 Wireless markup language -- 7.7.2 Protocol architecture -- 7.7.3 System architecture -- 7.7.4 Services and applications -- 8 Improved data services in GSM: GPRS, HSCSD and EDGE -- 8.1 GPRS -- 8.1.1 System architecture of GPRS -- 8.1.2 Services -- 8.1.3 Session management, mobility management and routing -- 8.1.4 Protocol architecture -- 8.1.5 Signaling plane -- 8.1.6 Interworking with IP networks -- 8.1.7 Air interface -- 8.1.8 Authentication and ciphering -- 8.1.9 Summary of GPRS -- 8.2 HSCSD -- 8.2.1 Architecture -- 8.2.2 Air interface -- 8.2.3 HSCSD resource allocation and capacity issues -- 8.3 EDGE
8.3.1 The EDGE concept -- 8.3.2 EDGE physical layer, modulation and coding -- 8.3.3 EDGE: effects on the GSM system architecture -- 8.3.4 ECSD and EGPRS -- 8.3.5 EDGE Classic and EDGE Compact -- 9 Beyond GSM and UMTS: 4G -- Appendices -- A Data communication and networking -- A.1 Reference configuration -- A.2 Overview of data communication -- A.3 Service selection at transitions between networks -- A.4 Bit rate adaptation -- A.5 Asynchronous data services -- A.5.1 Transparent transmission in the mobile network -- A.5.2 Nontransparent data transmission -- A.5.3 PAD access to public packet-switched data networks -- A.6 Synchronous data services -- A.6.1 Overview -- A.6.2 Synchronous X.25 packet data network access -- A.7 Teleservices: fax -- B Aspects of network operation -- B.1 Objectives of GSM NM -- B.2 Telecommunication management network -- B.3 TMN realization in GSM networks -- C GSM Addresses -- D List of Acronyms -- References -- Index
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Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Eberspächer, Jörg GSM - Architecture, Protocols and Services : Architecture, Protocols and Services New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2009 9780470030707
Subject Global system for mobile communications.;Cell phone systems
Electronic books
Alt Author Bettstetter, Christian
Vögel, Hans-Joerg
Hartmann, Christian
Eberspächer, Jörg
Vögel, Hans-Joerg
Vogel, Hans-Joerg
Eberspä Cher, Jö Rg
Vö Gel, Hans-Joerg
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