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Author Poskitt, Elizabeth
Title Management of Childhood Obesity
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2008
©2008
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (234 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction -- Prevalence -- Why is overweight/obesity so prevalent today? -- Genes versus environment -- Programming -- Family history -- Socioeconomic status -- Energy balance -- Energy intakes -- Energy expenditures -- Early feeding -- Weaning -- What is being done? -- 2 How fat is fat? Measuring and defining overweight and obesity -- Fattening periods -- Early infancy -- Age 5-10 years: the adiposity rebound -- Males: pre-puberty -- Females: late puberty -- Methods of measuring fatness and defining obesity -- Measuring the proportion of fat in the body -- Possible primary care equipment for measuring body fatness -- Measurement of body density: Bod Pod (Life Measurements Inc., Concord, CA) -- Measurement of bioelectrical impedance: Tanita (Tanita Corp., Tokyo, Japan) -- Body fat distribution and measuring fatness in specific areas -- Skinfolds -- Waist circumference -- Weight and height relationships: BMI -- Recommendations -- 3 Where should overweight/obese children be managed? -- Who should manage these children? -- Who should run what sort of facility? -- Where? -- How? -- Forms of management -- Individual management -- Group management -- Residential management -- Computer-based weight control advice -- Aspects common to all projects for childhood weight management -- Ambience -- Frequency of attendance -- Targets and intended outcomes? -- What rates of weight loss should be targeted? -- Targets for infants and toddlers -- Recommendations -- 4 How do we approach the overweight/obese child and family? -- The parents' perspective -- What rouses parental concerns about childreńs weights? -- What do parents want to know? -- How to approach the children -- Giving advice -- Difficult age groups -- Preschool children
Adolescents -- Those not interested -- Recommendations -- 5 The clinical assessment: what are the special points? -- Looking for underlying pathology -- Clinical examination -- Measuring and interpreting blood pressure in the overweight -- Obesity syndromes -- Prader-Willi syndrome -- Recommendations -- 6 What complications should we look for now and later? -- Orthopaedic problems -- Flat feet -- Blount's disease -- Genu valgum -- Slipped upper (capital) femoral epiphysis -- Skin problems -- Acanthosis nigricans -- Cardiorespiratory complaints -- Asthma -- Sleep disordered breathing -- Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome -- Central sleep apnoea -- Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (Pickwickian syndrome) -- Hypertension -- Hormonal and metabolic problems -- Type 2 diabetes -- Hyperlipidaemia -- Metabolic syndrome -- Polycystic ovary syndrome -- Hepatosteatosis -- Pseudotumor cerebri -- Recommendations -- 7 How does psychology influence management? -- Understanding the child in the family context -- Challenges to psychological robustness -- Teasing and bullying -- Self-esteem, self-worth -- School failure -- Unhappiness, isolation and low self-esteem -- Overindulgence or 'spoiling' -- Psychoses -- Eating disorders -- Depression -- Behavioural management in Prader-Willi syndrome -- Recommendations -- 8 Management: what do we mean by lifestyle changes? -- How much should families be involved in weight control? -- What behavioural changes should take place? -- Sleep -- Television -- What is the impact of computer and computer games on weight control? -- Environmental temperature -- Particular groups -- The young preschool child -- Food and love -- Children with disability -- Adolescents -- Recommendations -- 9 How can we reduce energy intake? -- How do we find out what overweight/obese children are eating?
Twenty-four-hour dietary recall/typical day's diet -- Food frequency questionnaire -- Interpreting the dietary history -- What does the child not eat? -- What does the child drink/not drink? -- Where does eating take place? -- Attitudes to dietary change -- Specific actions to reduce energy intakes -- Make changes to maximize enjoyment and satisfaction from meals -- Organize meals and snacks -- Deal with boredom and hunger -- The role of foods with low glycaemic index -- Manage food refusal -- Manage fluid intakes -- Modify food energy density -- Providing specific advice -- Food labelling -- Sustainability in dietary change -- So what is there left to eat? -- 'I'm hungry' -- School dinners -- Recommendations -- 10 How can we increase energy expenditure? -- What has changed? -- Urbanization -- Transport -- Security in the community -- Smaller homes and gardens -- Home equipment -- Entertainment -- Educational aspirations -- Time -- Employment -- The complexity of the obesity epidemic -- The health benefits of activity -- Assessing levels of activity in children -- Assessing activity -- Interpreting the questionnaires -- Motion sensors -- What hinders activity in the overweight/obese? -- How do we increase energy expenditure in physical activity? -- Reduce sedentary behaviour -- Strategies for increasing physical activity -- Walking -- The journey to school -- Vigorous activity -- Implementing change in physical activity -- Parents as role models -- Incremental change in physical activity -- Change for those who are reluctant to be active with others -- Informal physical activities -- Should we buy him/her an exercise bicycle? -- Swimming -- The rewards -- Recommendations -- 11 What else can be done? -- Drugs -- Orlistat -- Sibutramine -- Metformin -- Bariatric surgery -- What operations are done? -- Complications -- Prader-Willi syndrome and surgery
Recommendations -- 12 How can we sustain healthy weight management? -- Reinforcement -- What should be done when children attend for follow-up? -- Incremental changes -- Signing off -- Recommendations -- 13 What can we do to prevent childhood overweight and obesity? -- Who is at risk? -- Prevention at home -- At-risk ages -- Weaning -- Diet -- Young children are very determined -- Young children have very variable appetites -- Physical activity in young children -- Adolescents -- Dietary habits -- Physical activity -- Schools -- The community -- What can a primary care trust do to prevent overweight/obesity? -- Government -- Industry -- Commercial promotion -- The media -- What is the role of the health care professional in community change? -- Evaluation -- Recommendations -- References -- Index
Provides guidance to all healthcare professionals on helping overweight children and their families
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Poskitt, Elizabeth Management of Childhood Obesity Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2008 9780521609777
Subject Obesity - psychology
Electronic books
Alt Author Edmunds, Laurel
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