Record:   Prev Next
Author Ulrich, Roger B
Title A Companion to Roman Architecture
Imprint Oxford : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (615 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser
Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser
Note Intro -- A Companion to Roman Architecture -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Contributors -- Maps/General Images -- Introduction -- 1 Italic Architecture of the Earlier First Millennium BCE -- Introduction -- 1. Early Domestic Architecture -- 2. Civic Architecture -- 3. Defensive Architecture -- 4. Sacred Architecture -- 5. Conclusions -- Guide to Further Reading -- 2 Rome and Her Neighbors: Greek Building Practices in Republican Rome -- Introduction -- 1. The Rise of Individualism -- 2. Engaging in a Hellenistic Koine : The Effects of Greek Conquest -- 3. 146 BCE and After: The Age of Hermodorus -- 4. The Slow Triumph of Monarchism -- Guide to Further Reading -- 3 Creating Imperial Architecture -- Introduction -- 1. Functions Served by the New Architecture -- 2. Religious Functions: Public Cults and Imperial Cults -- 3. The Domus Augusti and Augustus ' s Buildings on the Campus Martius -- 4. Entertainment -- 5. Hygiene, Sport, and Education -- 6. Conclusion: From Hellenistic and Italic Architecture to Roman Imperial Architecture -- Guide to Further Reading -- 4 Columns and Concrete: Architecture from Nero to Hadrian -- Introduction -- 1. Structure and Construction -- 2. Artifice and Reality -- 3. Designing in Section -- 4. Columns and Concrete -- 5. Conclusion -- Guide to Further Reading -- 5 The Severan Period -- Introduction -- 1. Rome and Ostia -- 2. Eastern and Western Provinces -- 3. Architectural Ornament and the "Marble Style" -- 4. Changing Relations between East and West -- Guide to Further Reading -- 6 The Architecture of Tetrarchy -- Introduction -- 1. Rome and Romans outside Rome -- 2. Rome away from Rome: New Imperial Cities -- 3. "The Emperor Builds for his People": Baths and Circuses -- 4. Imperial Palaces and Political Communication -- 5. Palace Architecture -- 6. Imperial Tombs outside Rome
7. A Retirement Palace -- 8. An Imperial Villa for a Military Emperor -- 9. The Tetrarchic Paradigm and Rome -- 10. Epilogue: Constantine and the TetrarchicTradition -- Guide to Further Reading -- 7 Architect and Patron -- Introduction -- Guide to Further Reading -- 8 Plans, Measurement Systems, and Surveying: The Roman Technology of Pre-Building -- Introduction -- 1. Models and Plans -- 2. Scale Planning and the Shape of Order -- 3. Measure and Commensuration -- 4. The Shaping of Ordered Space -- Guide to Further Reading -- 9 Materials and Techniques -- Introduction -- 1. Geography and Chronology: The Environment of Rome and Italy -- 2. The Development of Materials in Central Italy -- 3. Materials by Type: Timber -- 4. Materials by Type: Brick and Tile -- 5. Materials by Type: Stone and Marble -- 6. Materials by Type: Mortar and Concrete -- 7. Materials by Type: Stucco -- 8. Materials by Type: Metal -- 9. Materials by Type: Glass -- 10. Selecting the Right Material -- 11. Foundations, Footings, and Substructures -- 12. Floors: Contignatio and Suspensurae -- 13. Walls - Special Techniques -- 14. Spanning Spaces: Trabeated Architecture -- 15. Spanning Spaces: Arches and Vaulting -- 16. Integration of Diverse Materials and Structural Components -- 17. Building Techniques Characteristic of the Roman Provinces: Greece and Asia Minor -- 18. Building Techniques Characteristic of the Roman Provinces: Egypt -- 19. Building Techniques Characteristic of the Roman Provinces: North Africa -- 20. Building Techniques Characteristic of the Roman Provinces: Europe and Britain -- 21. Summary: Roman Contributions -- Guide to Further Reading -- 10 Labor Force and Execution -- Introduction -- 1. Off-Site Labor -- 1.1. Bricks and roof tiles -- 1.2. Prestige marbles -- 2. On-Site Labor -- 2.1. Military building -- 3. Process -- 3.1. Modeling construction projects
Guide to Further Reading -- 11 Urban Sanctuaries: The Early Republic to Augustus -- Introduction -- 1. The Temple of Capitoline Jupiter and Its Influence -- 2. Hellenistic Influences in the Second Century BCE: The Ionic Order -- 3. Hellenistic Influences in the First Century BCE: The Corinthian Order -- 4. The Temple and Forum in First-Century-BCE Rome -- 5. Urban Sanctuaries in the Time of Augustus -- Guide to Further Reading -- 12 Monumental Architecture of Non-Urban Cult Places in Roman Italy -- Introduction -- 1. From Sacred Natural Places to Monumentality -- 2. Monumental Building between Global and Local -- 3. The Relationship between Cult Place and Community -- 4. Latium: The Sanctuary of Hercules Victor at Tibur -- 5. Samnium: The Sanctuaries of Pietrabbondante and S. Giovanni in Galdo, Colle Rimontato -- 6. Lucania: The Sanctuaries of Serra Lustrante d'Armento and Rossano di Vaglio -- 7. Conclusion -- Guide to Further Reading -- 13 Fora -- Introduction -- 1. The Forum as Considered by Vitruvius -- 2. The Development of the Western Forum -- 3. The Forum Romanum as Symbolic Space -- 4. Forum Plazas in the West: Case Studies of Architectural Experience -- Guide to Further Reading -- 14 Funerary Cult and Architecture -- Introduction -- 1. A Landscape of Tombs -- 2. Funerary Cult -- 3. Why Build a Tomb? -- 4. The Necropolis of Isola Sacra -- Guide to Further Reading -- 15 Building for an Audience: The Architecture of Roman Spectacle -- Introduction: Forms of Entertainment Buildings -- 1. Locating Spectacle: The Structure and Context of Venues -- 2. Designing for an Audience: Structure, Materials, and Amenities -- 3. Entertaining the Roman World: Hierarchy, Patronage, and Display -- Guide to Further Reading -- 16 Roman Imperial Baths and Thermae -- Introduction -- 1. Thermae and Balneae -- 2. Popularity and Importance of Bathing
3. The Nature and Planning of Balnea and Thermae -- 4. Water Needs of Thermae -- 5. Administration and Services of Thermae -- 6. Thermae as Educational and Intellectual Institutions -- 7. High Costs of Building the Thermae -- 8. Thermae of Rome -- 8.1. Thermae of Agrippa and the Thermae of Nero -- 8.2. Thermae of Trajan -- 8.3. Thermae of Caracalla and the Thermae of Diocletian -- 9. Display of Art in Thermae -- 10. Thermae in North Africa -- 10.1. Hadrianic Baths, Lepcis Magna -- 10.2. Antonine Thermae, Carthage -- 11. Bath-Gymnasia in Asia Minor -- 11.1. Harbor Bath-Gymnasium, Ephesus -- 11.2. Vedius Bath-Gymnasium, Ephesus and Imperial Bath-Gymnasium, Sardis -- 11.3. Baths and Thermae of Constantinople -- 12. Baths and Thermae in Antioch and Roman Syria -- 13. Baths and Thermae in Late Antique and Christian Worlds -- Guide to Further Reading -- 17 Courtyard Architecture in the Insulae of Ostia Antica -- Introduction -- 1. Representative Examples -- 1.1. Caseggiato dei Triclini (Ostia I, XII, 1, original construction ca. 120 CE) -- 1.2. Horrea Epagathiana (I, VIII, 3, 137-138 CE -- Figure  17.4) -- 2. Distribution of Insulae by Time and Place -- 3. Notes on the Origin of the Insula with a Cortile Porticato -- Guide to Further Reading -- 18 Domus/Single Family House -- Introduction -- 1. Form and Function in the Traditional Domus (ca. 300-150 BC) -- 1.1. Evidence from Pompeii -- 2. Form and Function in the Domus -with- Peristyle (ca. 150 BC -350 CE) -- 2.1. Post-Pompeian versions of the domus -- 3. Systems of Decoration -- Guide to Further Reading -- 19 Private Villas: Italy and the Provinces -- Introduction -- 1. What is a Roman Villa? -- 2. Designing the Villa -- Guide to Further Reading -- 20 Romanization -- Introduction: Interpreting Cultural Change and Material Culture -- 1. The Evidence: Potentials and Problems
2. The Development of Roman Architecture in the Western Provinces -- 3. Regionality in Provincial Architecture -- 4. A Different Approach to Provincial Architecture -- 5. Conclusions -- Guide to Further Reading -- 21 Streets and Facades -- Introduction -- 1. The Layout of Streets -- 2. The Surface and the Width of Streets -- 3. Facades of Buildings and Streets -- 4. Crossroads, Street Furniture, and Signage -- 5. The Monument and the Street -- 6. Changing Streets or the Architecture of Movement in the Roman City -- Guide to Further Reading -- 22 Vitruvius and his Influence -- Guide to Further Reading -- 23 Ideological Applications: Roman Architecture and Fascist Romanità -- Introduction -- 1. Forging a Fascist Style: The Theoretical Debate -- 2. Il Stile Littorio in Practice: The Via dell' Impero 1931-1938 -- 3. Conclusions -- Guide to Further Reading -- 24 Visualizing Architecture Then and Now: Mimesis and the Capitoline Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus -- Introduction: Theorizing Architectural Representation -- 1. Analyzing Ancient Images of Temple Facades -- 2. Debating Plans -- 3. Reconstructing Urban Contexts -- 4. Visualizing Possibilities -- Guide to Further Reading -- 25 Conservation -- Introduction -- 1. The Aesthetics of Roman Architectural Conservation -- 2. Time, Fidelity, and Identity -- 3. Conclusion -- Guide to Further Reading -- Glossary -- References -- Index
A Companion to Roman Architecture presents a comprehensive review of the critical issues and approaches that have transformed scholarly understanding in recent decades in one easy-to-reference volume. Offers a cross-disciplinary approach to Roman architecture, spanning technology, history, art, politics, and archaeology Brings together contributions by leading scholars in architectural history An essential guide to recent scholarship, covering new archaeological discoveries, lesser known buildings, new technologies and space and construction Includes extensive, up-to-date bibliography and glossary of key Roman architectural terms
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Ulrich, Roger B. A Companion to Roman Architecture Oxford : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2013 9781118325117
Subject Architecture, Roman
Electronic books
Alt Author Quenemoen, Caroline K
Record:   Prev Next