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Author Association, British Medical
Title Assessment of Mental Capacity : Guidance for Doctors and Lawyers
Imprint Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2004
©2008
book jacket
Edition 2nd ed
Descript 1 online resource (254 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Assessment of Mental Capacity: Guidance for doctors and lawyers -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- List of cases -- List of statutes -- List of statutory instruments -- Part I Introduction -- 1 The law, practice, and this book -- 1.1 What is capacity? -- 1.2 The need to define capacity -- 1.3 Proposals for law reform -- 1.4 How to use this book -- 1.5 Scope of this book -- 1.6 Where to obtain further advice -- 2 Professional and ethical issues -- 2.1 Capacity to instruct a solicitor -- 2.2 Confidentiality -- 2.3 Creating the right environment for assessing capacity -- 2.4 Refusal to be assessed -- 2.5 People assessed as lacking capacity -- 2.6 Summary of points for doctors -- 2.7 Summary of points for lawyers -- Part II Legal principles -- 3 What are the legal principles? -- 3.1 Capacity and the role of the courts -- 3.2 Capacity and the law of evidence -- 3.3 Practical suggestions for solicitors instructing doctors -- 3.4 Practical suggestions for doctors receiving instructions from solicitors -- 3.5 Witnessing documents -- Part III Legal tests of capacity -- 4 Capacity to deal with financial affairs -- 4.1 Powers of attorney -- 4.2 Capacity to manage property and affairs -- 4.3 Capacity to claim and receive social security benefits -- 4.4 Protection from financial abuse -- 5 Capacity to make a will -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Testamentary capacity -- 5.3 Supervening incapacity -- 5.4 The need for medical evidence - the "golden rule" -- 5.5 Checklist -- 5.6 Capacity to revoke a will -- 5.7 Statutory wills -- 6 Capacity to make a gift -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 The test of capacity -- 6.3 Checklist -- 6.4 Gifts made by attorneys -- 6.5 Gifts made on behalf of Court of Protection patients -- 6.6 Risk of financial abuse -- 7 Capacity to litigate -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The test of capacity -- 7.3 Applying the test
7.4 The representative in legal proceedings -- 7.5 Implications of incapacity -- 8 Capacity to enter into a contract -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 General rules -- 8.3 Voidable contracts -- 8.4 Necessaries -- 8.5 Proposals for law reform -- 8.6 Court of Protection patients -- 8.7 Checklist -- 9 Capacity to vote -- 9.1 Entitlement to vote -- 9.2 Legal incapacity to vote -- 9.3 Eligibility for registration -- 9.4 At the polling station -- 9.5 Postal and proxy voting -- 9.6 Conclusion -- 10 Capacity and personal relationships -- 10.1 Right to form relationships -- 10.2 Family relationships -- 10.3 Sexual relationships -- 10.4 Capacity to consent to marriage -- 10.5 Capacity to separate or divorce -- 10.6 Conclusion -- 11 Capacity to consent: the criminal law and sexual offences -- 11.1 Proposed changes to the law -- 11.2 Giving evidence in court -- 11.3 Conclusion -- 12 Capacity to consent to and refuse medical treatment -- 12.1 Medical procedures -- 12.2 The need for patient consent -- 12.3 Capacity to consent to medical procedures -- 12.4 Treatment of adults lacking capacity to consent -- 12.5 Capacity to make anticipatory decisions -- 12.6 Confidentiality -- 12.7 Access to records -- 13 Capacity to consent to research and innovative treatment -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Research governance -- 13.3 Capacity to consent to research -- 13.4 Research involving incompetent adults -- 13.5 Innovative treatment -- 13.6 Proposals for law reform -- Part IV Practical aspects of the assessment of capacity -- 14 Practical guidelines for doctors -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Defining capacity -- 14.3 The doctor's role -- 14.4 A systematic approach to assessing capacity -- 14.5 The mental state in relation to capacity -- 14.6 Personality disorders -- 14.7 The duty to enhance mental capacity -- 14.8 Retrospective assessment -- 14.9 General guidance
15 Practical guidelines for lawyers -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Who should assess the person? -- 15.3 Psychiatric diagnoses -- 15.4 Medical assessment of mental conditions -- Appendices -- Appendix A Case studies -- Appendix B The Official Solicitor -- Appendix C Practice Note (Official Solicitor: Declaratory Proceedings: Medical and welfare decisions for adults who Lack Capacity) -- Appendix D Practice Note (Official Solicitor: Appointment in Family Proceedings) -- Appendix E Medical certificate for the Official Solicitor with guidance notes -- Appendix F Medical certificate for the Court of Protection with notes for guidance -- Appendix G Sample letter: Test of capacity -- Useful addresses -- Further reading -- Index
This guide on assessment of people with some sort of mental impairment is a broad ranging report produced jointly by the British Medical Association and the Law Society. It is an authoritative statement on an important area. Its wide ranging coverage makes it essential reading for these groups. The second edition has been revised throughout to bring it right up to date with present requirements
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Association, British Medical Assessment of Mental Capacity : Guidance for Doctors and Lawyers Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2004 9780727916716
Subject Capacity and disability -- Great Britain.;Mental health laws -- Great Britain
Electronic books
Alt Author Wales, Law Society of England and
Staff, British Medical Association
Society, The Law
The Law Society,
The Law Society,
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