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Author Duff, R. A
Title Punishment, Communication, and Community
Imprint Cary : Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2000
©2003
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (266 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Studies in Crime and Public Policy Ser
Studies in Crime and Public Policy Ser
Note Intro -- Contents -- Introduction -- 1. What Is to Be Justified? -- 2. Theory and Practice -- 3. What Kind of Justification? -- 4. A Brief Overview -- 1 Consequentialists, Retributivists, and Abolitionists -- 1. Pure Consequentialism and Punishment -- 1.1. The Structure of a Consequentialist Account -- 1.2. Objections to Pure Consequentialism: The Rights of the Innocent -- 1.3. Consequentialist Responses -- 2. Side-Constrained Consequentialism -- 2.1. Side-Constraints and 'Negative' Retributivism -- 2.2. Objections: Doing Justice to the Guilty -- 3. Forfeiture of Rights and Societal Defense -- 3.1. Forfeiting Rights or Moral Standing -- 3.2. Punishment as Societal Defense -- 4. Retributivist Themes and Variations -- 4.1. "The Guilty Deserve to Suffer -- 4.2. The Removal of Unfair Advantage -- 4.3. Punitive Emotions -- 4.4. Punishment as Communication -- 5. The Abolitionist Challenge -- 5.1. What Is to Be Abolished? -- 5.2. Why Abolition? -- 5.3. What Should Replace Punishment? -- 2 Liberal Legal Community -- 1. 'Liberalism' and 'Communitarianism' -- 1.1. Liberalism and Punishment -- 1.2. The Penal Rhetoric of 'Community' -- 2. A Normative Idea(l) of Community -- 2.1. A Model: Academic Community -- 2.2. Political Community -- 3. 'Communitarianism' and 'Liberalism' (Again) -- 3.1. Metaphysical and Normative Issues -- 3.2. 'I' and 'We' -- 3.3. Choice and Recognition -- 3.4. Individual Goods and Shared Goods -- 4. The Criminal Law of a Liberal Polity -- 4.1. Prohibitions and Declarations -- 4.2. The Criminal Law as a Common Law -- 4.3. The Concept of Crime -- 4.4. The Authority of the Criminal Law -- 4.5. A Limited Criminal Law -- 5. Nonvoluntary Membership -- 6. Responses to Crime -- 3 Punishment, Communication, and Community -- 1. Can Criminal Punishment Be Consistent with Liberal Community? -- 1.1. Modes of Inclusion and Exclusion
1.2. Exclusionary Punishments -- 2. Punishment and Communication -- 2.1. Communication and Expression -- 2.2. Communication and the Criminal Law -- 2.3. Punishment, Communication, and Hard Treatment -- 3. Communication, Deterrence, and Prudential Supplements -- 3.1. Communication Plus Deterrence -- 3.2. Censure and Prudential Supplements -- 4. Punishment as Purposive Communication -- 4.1. Punishment as Moral Education? -- 4.2. Mediation: Civil versus Criminal -- 4.3. Criminal Mediation, Punishment, and Communication -- 5. Probation and Community Service as Communicative Punishments -- 5.1. Probation as Punishment -- 5.2. Extending Probation -- 5.3. Community Service Orders as Public Reparation -- 5.4. Combination Orders: Mediating between Community and Offender -- 6. Punishment as Penance -- 6.1. The Three 'R's of Punishment -- 6.2. Who Owes What to Whom? -- 7. Different Kinds of Offender -- 7.1. The Morally Persuaded Offender -- 7.2. The Shamed Offender -- 7.3. The Already Repentant Offenderd -- 7.4. The Defiant Offender -- 8. Penitential Punishment and the Liberal State -- 9. But Yet ... -- 4 Communicative Sentencing -- 1. Punishing Proportionately -- 1.1. Rela five or Absolute Proportionality? -- 1.2. Proportionality of What to What? -- 1.3. Positive or Negative? -- 1.4. Overriding or Defeasible? -- 1.5. Beyond Proportionality -- 2. Punishments and Their Meanings -- 2.1. Monetary Punishments -- 2.2. The Meaning of Imprisonment -- 2.3. Capital Punishment -- 3. Who Decides? -- 3.1. 'Doing Justice': General versus Particular -- 3.2. Negotiated Sentences? -- 4. Criminal Record and 'Dangerous' Offenders -- 4.1. The Relevance of Prior Criminal Record -- 4.2. 'Dangerous' Offenders -- 5 From Theory to Practice -- 1. Ideal Theories and Actual Practices -- 2. Preconditions of Criminal Punishment -- 2.1. Conditions and Preconditions
2.2. Political Obligation -- 2.3. To Whom Must I Answer? -- 2.4. The Language of the Law -- 2.5. Law and Community -- 3. Can Criminal Punishment Be Justified? -- Notes -- References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- V -- W -- Y -- Z
Part of the Studies in Crime and Public Policy series, this book, written by one of the top philosophers of punishment, examines the main trends in penal theorizing over the past three decades. Duff asks what can justify criminal punishment, and then explores the legitimacy of actual practices by examining what would count as adequate justification for them. Duff argues that a "communicative conception of punishment," which he presents as a third way between consequentialist and retributive theories, offers the most fruitful way of understanding punishment's meaning and justification. Duff addresses such question as how much sentences should be constrained by proportionality requirements; what modalities of punishment best communicate their intended meaning; and what decisionmaking procedures he envisions. This book will appeal to criminologists, philosophers, and others interested in theories of punishment
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Duff, R. A. Punishment, Communication, and Community Cary : Oxford University Press, Incorporated,c2000 9780195104295
Subject Communities -- Philosophy.;Criminal justice, Administration of -- Philosophy.;Punishment -- Philosophy.;Sentences (Criminal procedure) -- Philosophy
Electronic books
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