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Author Quevauviller, Philippe P
Title Hydrometeorological Hazards : Interfacing Science and Policy
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2014
©2015
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (367 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Hydrometeorological Extreme Events
Hydrometeorological Extreme Events
Note Cover -- Title page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Series Foreword -- Preface -- The Series Editor - Philippe Quevauviller -- List of Contributors -- Part 1 Setting the Scene -- Chapter 1.1Strengthened Resilience from Historic Experience. European Societies Confronted with Hydrometeors in the Sixteenth to Twentieth Centuries -- 1.1.1 Introduction -- 1.1.2 Five centuries of droughts -- 1.1.2.1 Historic material and methods of evaluation -- 1.1.2.2 A comparative approach to historic European droughts -- 1.1.3 The European coast confronted with surges: A first ever? -- 1.1.3.1 The French coasts -- 1.1.3.2 European comparison -- 1.1.3.3 Memory of the big floods in Northern Europe -- 1.1.4 A memory of risk or a culture of survival? -- 1.1.4.1 Living with droughts in the Cyclades: The Syros island -- 1.1.4.2 The Atlantic flood of 1937 as a revelation of coastal weaknesses -- 1.1.4.3 The lessons of history regarding impact strength -- 1.1.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 1.2 Current Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Extreme Events -- 1.2.1 Introduction -- 1.2.2 Global water balance, past and future -- 1.2.2.1 Humidity and evaporation -- 1.2.2.2 Precipitation -- 1.2.2.3 River run-off -- 1.2.3 Global extremes - Rainfall, floods and droughts -- 1.2.3.1 Precipitation -- 1.2.3.2 Storminess -- 1.2.3.3 Droughts -- 1.2.3.4 Floods -- 1.2.4 Future global predictions -- 1.2.5 Regional drought and water resources -- 1.2.5.1 Drought in the twentieth century -- 1.2.5.2 Twenty-first century drought -- 1.2.6 Case study: Science to support policy for flood management under climate change -- 1.2.7 Adaptation planning -- 1.2.8 Concluding remarks -- References -- Chapter 1.3 Features Common to Different Hydrometeorological Events and Knowledge Integration -- 1.3.1 Introduction -- 1.3.2 Extreme hydrometeorological events and disasters: An increasing trend
1.3.3 Integrating disaster risk management and climate change adaptation -- 1.3.4 Predicting disasters: Dealing with uncertainties and scales -- 1.3.5 Better understanding system exposure at the hazard -- 1.3.6 Resilience: From concept to operation -- 1.3.7 Learning from experience -- 1.3.8 Risk governance: Responsibility and participation -- 1.3.9 Risk communication -- 1.3.10 A roadmap towards a sustainable future -- References -- Chapter 1.4 Science and Policy Interfacing -- 1.4.1 Introduction -- 1.4.2 Taking account of the knowledge base -- 1.4.3 Concept of science and policy interfacing -- 1.4.4 Matching research with policy needs -- 1.4.4.1 Type of research -- 1.4.4.2 Short analysis of drawbacks -- 1.4.5 Research - policy interactions -- 1.4.5.1 Interactions with the scientific community -- 1.4.5.2 Synthesis needs -- 1.4.5.3 Exchange platforms -- 1.4.6 Conclusions -- References -- Part 2 Policy Settings -- Chapter 2.1 When Science Meets Policy: Enhancing Governance and Management of Disaster Risks -- 2.1.1 Science and disaster risk management -- 2.1.2 Knowledge-based policy -- 2.1.3 The science - policy interface in practice -- 2.1.4 Evidence-based disaster risk policies -- 2.1.5 Climate research and disaster economics: Two scientific pillars of governance of disaster risks -- 2.1.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2.2 Hydrometeorological Extremes and the Science - policy Interface: IPCC -- 2.2.1 Introduction -- 2.2.2 IPCC at the interface of science and policy -- 2.2.3 Evolution of IPCC over 25 years -- 2.2.4 IPCC SREX messages in a nutshell -- 2.2.4.1 Observations -- 2.2.4.2 Projections -- 2.2.4.3 Managing the risk of hydrometeorological extremes -- 2.2.5 Final remarks - AR5 is there -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 2.3 A Snapshot of EU and International Policies Relevant to Hydrometeorological Events
2.3.1 Introduction - A complex policy framework -- 2.3.2 Climate change impacts on water -- 2.3.3 Policy background -- 2.3.4 International policies -- 2.3.5 EU water policies -- 2.3.5.1 The water framework directive -- 2.3.5.2 WFD and climate change -- 2.3.5.3 The flood directive -- 2.3.5.4 The communication on drought -- 2.3.6 Climate adaptation strategy -- 2.3.7 Conclusions -- References -- Part 3 Outline of Scientific Features -- Chapter 3.1 Hydroinformatics and Its Role in Flood Management -- 3.1.1 Background -- 3.1.2 Flood management in water-related activities -- 3.1.3 Why hydroinformatics? -- 3.1.4 Towards integrated flood management -- 3.1.5 Hydroinformatics and floods -- 3.1.6 Flood maps production -- 3.1.6.1 Producing the hydrograph -- 3.1.6.2 Hydraulic models -- 3.1.6.3 Parameter estimation in one-dimensional flow models -- 3.1.6.4 Parameter estimation in two-dimensional flow models -- 3.1.6.5 Validation of results -- 3.1.7 Real-time systems for decisions support -- 3.1.8 Emerging trends for higher efficiency -- 3.1.9 High resolution data and high resolution hydraulic modelling -- 3.1.10 From centralised to distributed and ubiquitous architecture -- 3.1.11 Perspectives in conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Chapter 3.2 Drought: How to be Prepared for the Hazard? -- 3.2.1 Introduction -- 3.2.2 Drought: Generating processes and identification -- 3.2.3 Trends in drought -- 3.2.3.1 Trends in observed drought -- 3.2.3.2 Trends in simulated historic drought -- 3.2.3.3 Future drought -- 3.2.4 Monitoring, management and early warning -- 3.2.5 Drought impacts and policy -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 3.3 Drought in the Light of Climate Change in the Mediterranean Area -- 3.3.1 Introduction -- 3.3.2 The limits of rainfall -- 3.3.2.1 Drought and water scarcity: Overlapping challenges in the region
3.3.3 Estimating drought vulnerability -- 3.3.3.1 Underlying causes of drought risk -- 3.3.3.2 A drought vulnerability index -- 3.3.4 From drought vulnerability to drought management -- 3.3.4.1 Policies, actions and examples -- 3.3.4.2 Linking indicators to drought management actions -- 3.3.5 Looking into the future -- 3.3.5.1 Climate change scenarios -- 3.3.5.2 Higher drought risk -- 3.3.5.3 Changes in water availability -- 3.3.5.4 Climate change as an opportunity to revise drought management -- 3.3.5.5 Conservation-oriented policies -- 3.3.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 3.4 Prediction of Storm Impacts on Beach and Dune Systems -- 3.4.1 Introduction -- 3.4.2 Coastal storm definitions -- 3.4.2.1 Meteorological approaches to assessing coastal storm severity -- 3.4.2.2 Engineering approaches to assessing coastal storm severity -- 3.4.3 The storm impact scale -- 3.4.3.1 Swash regime -- 3.4.3.2 Collision regime -- 3.4.3.3 Overwash regime -- 3.4.3.4 Inundation regime -- 3.4.4 Analytical methods of hazard definition -- 3.4.5 Modelling of storm impacts -- 3.4.5.1 Models based on the equilibrium profile theory -- 3.4.5.2 Process-based models -- 3.4.6 Storm impact indicators, early warning systems and disaster risk reduction -- 3.4.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Part 4 Social and Economic Considerations -- Chapter 4.1 Assessing the Costs of Natural Hazards - State of the Art and the Way Forward -- 4.1.1 Introduction -- 4.1.2 State of the art of cost assessment for natural hazards - An overview -- 4.1.2.1 Direct costs -- 4.1.2.2 Business interruption costs -- 4.1.2.3 Indirect costs -- 4.1.2.4 Intangible (non-market) costs -- 4.1.2.5 Risk mitigation costs -- 4.1.3 Conclusions and the way forward -- References -- Chapter 4.2 Resilience and Adaptation to Hydrometeorological Hazards -- 4.2.1 Introduction -- 4.2.2 Resilience
4.2.2.1 Psychological approaches to resilience -- 4.2.2.2 Social-ecological systems (SES) -- 4.2.2.3 Organisations and infrastructure -- 4.2.3 Discussion -- 4.2.3.1 Community -- 4.2.3.2 Adaptation -- 4.2.3.3 Resilience to hydrometeorological extremes -- 4.2.3.4 The sustainable livelihoods approach (SLA) -- 4.2.3.5 Pilot study location and event: Cockermouth, Cumbria, UK -- 4.2.3.6 Comparison of two small businesses in Cockermouth, Cumbria -- 4.2.4 Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Part 5 Conclusions -- Chapter 5 Conclusions, Outlook -- 5.1 Contextual developments -- 5.2 Scientific developments -- 5.3 Outlook -- 5.3.1 Strengths -- 5.3.2 Weaknesses -- 5.3.3 Threats -- 5.3.4 Opportunities -- Index -- Supplemental Images -- EULA
Recent hydrometeorological extreme events have highlighted the increased exposure and vulnerability of societies and the need to strengthen the knowledge-base of related policies. Current research is focused on improving forecasting, prediction and early warning capabilities in order to improve the assessment of vulnerability and risks linked to extreme climatic events. Hydrometeorological Hazards: Interfacing science and policy is the first volume of a series which will gather scientific and policy-related knowledge related to climate-related extreme events. Invited authors are internationally recognized experts in their respective fields. This volume reflects the most recent advances in science and policy within this field and takes a multidisciplinary approach. The book provides the reader with a state-of-the art account on flash floods, droughts, storms, and a comprehensive discussion focused on the cost of natural hazards, resilience and adaptation. This book will be an invaluable reference for advanced undergraduates taking courses with a focus on natural hazards including climate-related extreme events. The book will also be of interest to postgraduates, researchers and policy makers in this field looking for an overview of the subject
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Quevauviller, Philippe P. Hydrometeorological Hazards : Interfacing Science and Policy Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2014 9781118629567
Subject Hydrodynamic weather forecasting.;Hydrometeorology
Electronic books
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