Record:   Prev Next
Author Walters, Dale
Title Plant Defense : Warding off Attack by Pathogens, Herbivores and Parasitic Plants
Imprint Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2010
©2011
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (250 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- PLANT DEFENSE -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Why Do Plants Need Defenses? -- 1.1 Plants as sources of food -- 1.2 Organisms that use plants as food -- 1.2.1 Microorganisms -- 1.2.2 Parasitic angiosperms -- 1.2.3 Nematodes -- 1.2.4 Insects -- 1.2.5 Vertebrates -- 1.3 Impact of infection and herbivory in natural and agricultural ecosystems -- 1.3.1 Microorganisms -- 1.3.2 Parasitic angiosperms -- 1.3.3 Nematodes -- 1.3.4 Insects -- 1.3.5 Vertebrates -- 1.4 Conclusions -- Recommended reading -- References -- Chapter 2 What Defenses Do Plants Use? -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Defenses used against pathogens -- 2.2.1 Background -- 2.2.2 Passive or preexisting defenses -- 2.2.2.1 Preexisting structural defenses -- 2.2.2.2 Preexisting chemical defenses -- 2.2.3 Active or inducible defenses -- 2.2.3.1 Inducible structural defenses -- 2.2.3.2 Inducible chemical defenses -- 2.2.4 Defenses used against pathogens-the next step -- 2.3 Defenses used against parasitic plants -- 2.3.1 Background -- 2.3.2 Preattachment defense mechanisms -- 2.3.3 Prehaustorial defense mechanisms -- 2.3.4 Posthaustorial defense mechanisms -- 2.4 Defenses used against nematodes -- 2.4.1 Background -- 2.4.2 Passive or preexisting defenses -- 2.4.3 Active or inducible defenses -- 2.4.3.1 Phenylpropanoid metabolism -- 2.4.3.2 Hypersensitive response -- 2.5 Defenses used against herbivorous insects -- 2.5.1 Background -- 2.5.2 Physical barriers -- 2.5.2.1 Waxes on the leaf surface -- 2.5.2.2 Trichomes -- 2.5.2.3 Secretory canals -- 2.5.2.4 Leaf toughness and leaf folding -- 2.5.3 Chemical defenses -- 2.5.3.1 Terpenes -- 2.5.3.2 Phenolics -- 2.5.3.3 Nitrogen-containing organic compounds -- 2.5.3.4 Arthropod-inducible proteins -- 2.5.3.5 Volatile compounds -- 2.6 Defenses used against vertebrate herbivores -- 2.6.1 Background -- 2.6.2 Physical defenses
2.6.3 Chemical defenses -- 2.6.3.1 Phenolic compounds -- 2.6.3.2 Terpenoids -- 2.6.3.3 Nitrogen-containing compounds -- 2.6.3.4 Other chemicals -- 2.6.3.5 A final word on chemical defenses against vertebrate herbivory -- 2.7 Defenses used against neighboring plants-allelopathy -- 2.7.1 Background -- 2.7.2 Allelopathy and the black walnut -- 2.7.3 Allelopathy and the Californian chaparral -- 2.7.4 Allelopathy and spotted knapweed -- 2.8 Conclusions -- Recommended reading -- References -- Chapter 3 Sounding the Alarm: Signaling and Communication in Plant Defense -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Signaling in plant-pathogen interactions -- 3.2.1 Introduction -- 3.2.2 Local signaling and basal resistance -- 3.2.2.1 SA signaling -- 3.2.2.2 JA signaling -- 3.2.2.3 ET signaling -- 3.2.2.4 Signaling involving other plant hormones -- 3.2.3 Systemic signaling and induced resistance -- 3.2.3.1 Induced resistance -- 3.2.3.2 Signaling during SAR -- 3.2.3.3 Signaling during ISR -- 3.2.3.4 Priming -- 3.2.4 Volatile signaling -- 3.3 Signaling in plant-nematode interactions -- 3.3.1 Introduction -- 3.3.2 SA signaling -- 3.3.3 JA signaling -- 3.4 Signaling in plant-insect herbivore interactions -- 3.4.1 Introduction -- 3.4.2 Local signaling -- 3.4.2.1 JA signaling -- 3.4.2.2 ET signaling -- 3.4.2.3 SA signaling -- 3.4.2.4 Specificity and regulation of jasmonate-based defenses -- 3.4.3 Systemic signaling -- 3.4.3.1 Systemin -- 3.4.3.2 JA signaling -- 3.4.3.3 Within leaf signaling -- 3.4.4 Volatile signaling -- 3.4.5 Priming -- 3.5 Signaling in interactions between plants and vertebrate herbivores -- 3.6 Signaling in interactions between plants and parasitic plants3.6 Signaling in interactions between plants and parasitic plants -- 3.7 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 4 Plant Defense in the Real World: Multiple Attackers and Beneficial Interactions -- 4.1 Introduction
4.2 Dealing with multiple attackers: cross-talk between signaling pathways -- 4.2.1 Trade-offs associated with triggering SA-mediated defenses -- 4.2.1.1 SA suppression of JA-induced defenses -- 4.2.1.2 Molecular basis of SA suppression of JA defenses -- 4.2.1.3 Ecological costs of resistance to biotrophic versus necrotrophic pathogens -- 4.2.1.4 Trade-offs with mutualistic symbioses -- 4.2.1.5 Effects of SA- and JA-mediated defenses on bacterial communities associated with plants -- 4.2.2 Triggering SA-dependent defenses does not always compromise defense against insect herbivores -- 4.2.3 Trade-offs and positive outcomes associated with triggering JA-dependent defenses -- 4.2.4 Putting it all together: orchestrating the appropriate defense response -- 4.3 Can beneficial plant-microbe interactions induce resistance in plants? -- 4.3.1 Introduction -- 4.3.2 Induction of resistance by mycorrhizas -- 4.3.3 Resistance induced by endophytic and other beneficial fungi -- 4.4 Conclusions -- Recommended reading -- References -- Chapter 5 The Evolution of Plant Defense -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Hypotheses of plant defense -- 5.2.1 The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis -- 5.2.2 Optimal defense hypotheses -- 5.2.3 Plant apparency hypothesis -- 5.2.4 The carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis -- 5.2.5 The growth rate hypothesis -- 5.2.6 Hypotheses of plant defense-where next? -- 5.3 Evolution of plant defense strategies -- 5.3.1 The univariate trade-off hypothesis -- 5.3.2 The resistance-regrowth trade-off hypothesis -- 5.3.3 The plant apparency hypothesis -- 5.3.4 The resource availability hypothesis -- 5.3.5 Plant defense syndromes -- 5.4 Patterns of plant defense evolution -- 5.4.1 Adaptive radiation -- 5.4.2 Escalation of defense potency -- 5.4.3 Phylogenetic conservatism -- 5.4.4 Phylogenetic escalation and decline of plant defense strategies
5.5 Why do plants have induced defenses? -- 5.5.1 Costs -- 5.5.1.1 Allocation costs associated with induced responses to herbivory -- 5.5.1.2 Allocation costs associated with induced responses to pathogens -- 5.5.2 Targeting of inducible direct defenses -- 5.5.3 Targeting of inducible indirect defenses -- 5.5.4 Dispersal of damage -- 5.5.5 Possible role of pathogenic bacteria in the evolution of SAR -- 5.5.6 Conclusion -- 5.6 The coevolutionary arms race -- 5.7 Conclusions -- Recommended reading -- References -- Chapter 6 Exploiting Plant Defense -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Using plant resistance to protect crops-breeding -- 6.2.1 Introduction -- 6.2.2 Breeding for resistance -- 6.2.2.1 Sources of resistance -- 6.2.2.2 Breeding methods and selection strategies -- 6.2.3 Resistance in practice -- 6.2.4 Types of resistance -- 6.2.4.1 Monogenic resistance -- 6.2.4.2 Polygenic resistance -- 6.2.4.3 Durable resistance -- 6.2.4.4 Gene-for-gene concept -- 6.2.5 Making life more difficult for the attacker -- 6.3 Using plant resistance to protect crops-induced resistance -- 6.3.1 Introduction -- 6.3.2 Induced resistance for pathogen control -- 6.3.3 Induced resistance for control of herbivorous insects -- 6.3.4 Induced resistance for control of nematodes and parasitic plants -- 6.4 Using plant resistance to protect crops-biotechnological approaches -- 6.4.1 Introduction -- 6.4.2 Engineering resistance to pathogens -- 6.4.3 Engineering resistance to insects -- 6.4.4 Prospects for using transgenic resistance -- 6.5 Conclusions -- Recommended reading -- References -- Index
Dale Walters is based at Crop & Soil Systems Research Group, Scottish Agricultural College, Edinburgh, U. K
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Walters, Dale Plant Defense : Warding off Attack by Pathogens, Herbivores and Parasitic Plants Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2010 9781405175890
Subject Plants -- Disease and pest resistance.;Plant defenses
Electronic books
Record:   Prev Next