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Author Owen, Richard
Title Responsible Innovation : Managing the Responsible Emergence of Science and Innovation in Society
Imprint New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (307 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword: Why Responsible Innovation? -- Preface -- List of Contributors -- Chapter 1 Innovation in the Twenty-First Century -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 How Can We Innovate?-Innovation as a Process -- 1.3 Where Could We Innovate?-Innovation Strategy -- 1.4 Reframing Innovation -- 1.5 Reframing Challenges for Twenty-First Century Innovation -- 1.5.1 The Spaghetti Challenge -- 1.5.2 The Sappho Challenge-Bringing Stakeholders into the Frame -- 1.5.3 The Sustainability Challenge-Innovation for Sustainable Development -- 1.6 Emergent Properties of the New Innovation Environment -- Chapter 2 A Framework for Responsible Innovation -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Context: the Imperative for Responsible Innovation -- 2.2.1 Re-evaluating the Social Contract for Science and Innovation -- 2.2.2 The Responsibility Gap -- 2.2.3 The Dilemma of Control -- 2.2.4 Products and Purposes: the Democratic Governance of Intent -- 2.3 Locating Responsible Innovation within Prospective Dimensions of Responsibility -- 2.4 Four Dimensions of Responsible Innovation -- 2.5 Responsible Innovation: from Principles to Practice -- 2.5.1 Some Experiments in Responsible Innovation -- 2.6 Toward the Future: Building Capacity for Responsible Innovation -- Chapter 3 A Vision of Responsible Research and Innovation -- 3.1 Introduction: Technical Inventions, Innovation, and Responsibility -- 3.2 Responsible Research and Innovation and the Quest for the Right Impacts of Research -- 3.3 Defining the Right Impacts and Outcomes of Research -- 3.4 From Normative Anchor Points Toward the Defining of ̀̀Grand Challenges'' and the Direction of Innovation -- 3.5 Responsible Research and Innovation: Organizing Collective Responsibility -- 3.5.1 Some Examples of Irresponsible Innovation -- 3.6 A Framework for Responsible Research and Innovation
3.6.1 Use of Technology Assessment and Technology Foresight -- 3.6.2 Application of Precautionary Principle -- 3.6.3 Innovation Governance -- 3.7 Outlook -- Chapter 4 Value Sensitive Design and Responsible Innovation -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Innovation and Moral Overload -- 4.3 Values and Design -- 4.4 Responsible Innovation -- Chapter 5 Responsible Innovation-Opening Up Dialogue and Debate -- 5.1 A Short History of Controversies about Science and Technology -- 5.2 The Evolution of Public Engagement -- 5.3 The Case of Genetically Modified Foods in the UK -- 5.4 Sciencewise and the Institutional Embedding of Public Engagement in the UK -- 5.5 Motivations for Public Dialogue -- 5.6 The Claims for Public Dialogue -- 5.7 How (and When) Can Debate and Dialogue Be Opened Up? -- 5.8 The Substance of Public Concerns and Their Implications for Governance -- 5.9 Concluding Remarks -- Chapter 6 "Daddy, Can I Have a Puddle Gator?'': Creativity, Anticipation, and Responsible Innovation -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Understanding Anticipation -- 6.3 The Politics of Novelty -- 6.4 The Challenge of Speculative Ethics -- 6.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 7 What Is "Responsible'' about Responsible Innovation? Understanding the Ethical Issues -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The Changing Meaning of Responsibility -- 7.2.1 From the Divine Corporation to the Sovereign Individual -- 7.2.2 Knowledge, Uncertainty, and Human Finitude -- 7.2.3 Reciprocal and Non-Reciprocal Responsibility -- 7.3 Beyond the Sovereign Individual: Collective Responsibility, Desire, and Cultural Narratives -- 7.3.1 Passion Sits Alongside Reason -- 7.3.2 Non-Consequentialist Individual Responsibility -- 7.3.3 Collective Political Responsibility -- 7.3.4 The Virtues of Responsible Innovation -- 7.3.5 Narratives Take over Where Cost-Benefit Analysis Fails -- 7.4 Conclusion: Responsibility and Meaning
Chapter 8 Adaptive Governance for Responsible Innovation -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Risk and Adaptive Governance -- 8.3 Responsibility and Accountability -- 8.4 The Rationale for Regulation -- 8.5 Risk Regulation and Accountability for Product Safety -- 8.6 The Adaptation of Risk Regulation -- 8.7 Adaptive Innovation Governance: Limits and Needs -- 8.8 Conclusion -- Chapter 9 Responsible Innovation: Multi-Level Dynamics and Soft Intervention Practices -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Discourse and Activities at Different Levels of Governance -- 9.2.1 International and Bi-Lateral Meetings -- 9.2.2 Legislative Initiatives -- 9.2.3 Research Funding Agencies -- 9.2.4 Intermediary Organizations and Consortia -- 9.2.5 Concrete Activities -- 9.3 Two Cases of ̀̀Soft'' Intervention -- 9.3.1 STIRing the Capacities of Science and Innovation Practitioners -- 9.3.2 Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) of Newly Emerging Science and Technology -- 9.4 Concluding Observations on Governance -- Chapter 10 Responsible Innovation in Finance: Directions and Implications -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Perspectives on Responsible Innovation in Finance -- 10.2.1 Perspective on Function -- 10.2.2 Perspective on Moral Rules -- 10.2.3 Perspective on Internalized Values -- 10.2.4 Perspective on Aggregate Consequences -- 10.2.5 Perspective on Accountability -- 10.2.6 Perspective on Precaution -- 10.2.7 Perspective on Democracy -- 10.3 Some Directions for Further Reflection -- 10.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 11 Responsible Research and Innovation in Information and Communication Technology: Identifying and Engaging with the Ethical Implications of ICTs -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Conceptualizing Responsibility and Responsible Research and Innovation in ICT -- 11.2.1 Responsibility as a Social Ascription -- 11.2.2 Responsible Research and Innovation as Meta-Responsibility
11.2.3 Responsible Research and Innovation: the Four ̀̀P''s -- 11.3 Building a Framework for RRI in ICT -- 11.3.1 Product: ICTs and Their Ethical Implications -- 11.3.2 People: Landscape of ICT Ethics -- 11.3.3 Process: Governance of RRI in ICT -- 11.4 Critical Reflections -- 11.4.1 The Meta-Responsibilities of RRI -- 11.4.2 Further Research -- Chapter 12 Deliberation and Responsible Innovation: a Geoengineering Case Study -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Public Perceptions of Geoengineering -- 12.3 Exploring Public Perceptions of Geoengineering: an Empirical Study -- 12.3.1 Context -- 12.3.2 Method: Deliberating SPICE -- 12.3.3 Analysis -- 12.4 Public Perceptions of Geoengineering through the Lens of Responsible Innovation -- 12.4.1 Intentions -- 12.4.2 Responsibility -- 12.4.3 Impacts -- 12.4.4 The Role of the Public -- 12.5 Conclusion: Geoengineering-Responsible Innovation? -- Chapter 13 Visions, Hype, and Expectations: a Place for Responsibility -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 The Repertoires of Nano Futures -- 13.3 Narratives of Responsibility -- 13.3.1 Narrative 1: Nanofutures, Boundary Work and Technology Assessment Activities in the US and Germany -- 13.3.2 Narrative 2: Responsibility as Knowledge and Technology Transfer in the United States -- 13.4 Narratives, Visions and Conflicts: Lessons for RRI? -- Endnotes: Building Capacity for Responsible Innovation -- Building Capacity for Responsible Innovation: Awareness and Engagement -- Less Stick and More Carrot: Building Capacity through Education -- Index
Science and innovation have the power to transform our lives and the world we live in - for better or worse - in ways that often transcend borders and generations: from the innovation of complex financial products that played such an important role in the recent financial crisis to current proposals to intentionally engineer our Earth's climate. The promise of science and innovation brings with it ethical dilemmas and impacts which are often uncertain and unpredictable: it is often only once these have emerged that we feel able to control them. How do we undertake science and innovation responsibly under such conditions, towards not only socially acceptable, but socially desirable goals and in a way that is democratic, equitable and sustainable? Responsible innovation challenges us all to think about our responsibilities for the future, as scientists, innovators and citizens, and to act upon these. This book begins with a description of the current landscape of innovation and in subsequent chapters offers perspectives on the emerging concept of responsible innovation and its historical foundations, including key elements of a responsible innovation approach and examples of practical implementation.   Written in a constructive and accessible way, Responsible Innovation includes chapters on: Innovation and its management in the 21st century A vision and framework for responsible innovation Concepts of future-oriented responsibility as an underpinning philosophy Values - sensitive design Key themes of anticipation, reflection, deliberation and responsiveness Multi - level governance and regulation Perspectives on responsible innovation in finance, ICT, geoengineering and nanotechnology Essentially multidisciplinary in nature, this landmark text combines research from the fields of science and technology studies, philosophy, innovation governance,
business studies and beyond to address the question, "How do we ensure the responsible emergence of science and innovation in society?"
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Owen, Richard Responsible Innovation : Managing the Responsible Emergence of Science and Innovation in Society New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2013 9781119966357
Subject Technological innovations -- Environmental aspects.;New products -- Environmental aspects.;Research, Industrial -- Moral and ethical aspects
Electronic books
Alt Author Heintz, Maggy
Bessant, John R
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