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作者 Pauwels, Lieven
書名 Problematic Youth Group Involvement as Situated Choice : Testing an Integrated Condition-Controls-Exposure Model
出版項 Portland : Eleven International Publishing, 2015
©2016
國際標準書號 9789462743632 (electronic bk.)
9789462365933
book jacket
說明 1 online resource (227 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
附註 Cover -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1 Study background -- 2 Balance between theory, research, and policy -- 3 Aim of the research: key questions and constructs -- 4 Outline of chapters -- Chapter 2 Previous research on risk factors of problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The importance to study early adolescence -- 3 Risk factors for problematic youth group involvement and offending -- 4 Classification of the risk factors in the present study -- 5 Sex and ethnicity as risk factors -- Chapter 3 Origins of the integrative conditions-controls-exposure model -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Some notes on theoretical integration -- 3 From social disorganization to collective efficacy and from neighborhoods to micro-places -- 3.1 Shaw and McKay and the theory of neighborhood disorganization -- 3.2 Frederick M. Thrasher and gangland -- 3.3 Criticisms of the original model of neighborhood disorganization -- 3.4 Collective Efficacy Theory -- 3.5 Problems in neighborhood contextual research -- (1) Aggregation bias -- (2) The role of perception and observation of events in micro-places -- (3) The failure to distinguish between short-term situational effects and long-term developmental effects -- 4 From subjective alienation theory to locus of control theory -- 4.1 Alienation theory -- 4.2 Locus of control theory -- 4.3 Locus of control in Mirowsky and Ross' conditions-cognitions-emotions model -- 4.4 The importance of alienation for theories of problematic youth group involvement -- 5 Social bonding theories -- 6 Social (cognitive) learning theory -- 6.1 Some problems of cause and effect in social learning theories -- 6.2 The problem of tautology -- 6.3 The narrow vision of human nature in social learning theories -- 7 Self-control theory and its evolution
7.1 The concept of low self-control in Gottfredson and Hirschi's theory -- 7.2 The reformulation of the general theory of crime -- 7.3 Some criticisms -- The relationship between self-control and crime -- Moderation effects -- 8 The lifestyle/exposure model of offending -- Outline placeholder -- Some criticisms on the lifestyle models -- 9 Situational action theory and the explanation of problematic youth group participation? -- Outline placeholder -- Key principles of SAT -- The causes of the causes -- 10 Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Problematic youth group involvement as situated action: a meta-theoretical framework -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Why would we need an analytical meta-theoretical framework? -- 2.1 A scientific realist perspective on problematic youth group involvement -- 2.2 Explanation -- 2.3 Dissection and abstraction -- 2.4 Precision and clarity -- 2.5 The principle of complex parsimony -- 2.6 Action, its causes, and the causes of the causes -- 2.7 Mechanisms: the heart of the causal nexus -- 3 An emergentist systemist approach of problematic youth group participation -- 4 A short note on human nature and social order in emergentist systemism -- 5 Do we need general theories or theories of the middle range to explain offending and problematic youth group involvement? -- 6 Conclusion -- Chapter 5 An integrative micro-place conditions-controls-exposure model of problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The integrative micro-place conditions-controls-exposure model -- 2.1 The role of micro-setting differential social organization -- 2.2 The role of control orientation -- 2.3 The role of low social integration as differential social support/control -- 2.4 The role of low moral beliefs -- 2.5 The role of the ability to exercise self-control -- 2.6 The role of lifestyle risk or criminogenic exposure
Chapter 6 A multi-method approach in the city of Antwerp -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Antwerp youth survey -- 3 Community expert survey of key informants to measure collective efficacy and disorder -- 4 Administrative census tract level data and police register data -- 5 Aggregation of census data to the neighborhood cluster level -- 6 Basic socio-demographic statistics and the relative stability of neighborhood disadvantage and disorder -- 7 Definition of problematic youth group involvement -- 8 Previous studies on the social ecology of crime and delinquency in Antwerp -- Chapter 7 Crime patterns of problematic youth groups -- 1 Introduction and goals -- 2 Self-reported delinquency per item and by gender and immigrant background -- 3 Offending by problematic youth group participation -- 4 Age of onset and problematic youth group participation -- 5 Prevalence of offending by problematic youth group participation -- 6 Conclusion -- Chapter 8 Family social position and problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Family social position -- 2.1 Family structure -- 2.2 Family structural risk -- 3 Perceived relative deprivation and PYG involvement -- 4 Immigrant background versus Belgian native background -- 5 Repeating a class, disadvantage, and problematic youth group involvement -- 6 Multiple regression analyses of problematic youth group involvement by family structural background characteristics -- Chapter 9 The community context of problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The ecological distribution of problematic youth group involvement -- 3 The mediating role of disorganizational processes -- 4 Context or composition? -- 5 Neighborhood cluster versus street-level indicators of neighborhood characteristics -- 5.1 Neighborhood cluster cumulative risk score -- 5.2 Observations of collective efficacy and disorder
5.3 Problematic youth group involvement and street segment conditions (youths' observations) -- 5.4 Street segment cumulative risk score -- 6 Multiple logistic regression analyses of PYG on objective and subjective measures of community disadvantage -- Chapter 10 Individual characteristics and problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Social bonds and problematic youth group involvement -- 2.1 Family social bonds -- 2.2 Parental monitoring -- 2.3 School social bond -- 2.4 Class integration -- 2.5 Social bonds risk score -- 3 Cognitions and individual traits -- 3.1 Control orientation -- 3.2 Low moral beliefs -- 3.3 Poor ability to exercise self-control -- 3.4 Propensity to offend as overall construct -- 4 Exploring the interactions between control orientation and individual characteristics -- Chapter 11 Situational exposure and problematic youth group involvement -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Unstructured routines -- 3 Peer delinquency -- 4 Substance use -- 5 The overall lifestyle risk score -- 6 Exploring the interactions between situational mechanisms -- 7 Exploring the interactions between propensity and exposure -- 8 Surprising three-way interactions: propensity, exposure, and social integration -- 9 PYG involvement and cumulative risk factors -- 10 Problematic youth group involvement and risk factors by domain -- Chapter 12 Testing the integrative model -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Analytical strategy -- 3 Modeling the relationship between offending and problematic youth group participation -- 4 Path model in the general sample -- 5 Testing the integrated conditions-controls-exposure model by gender and sex differences -- Outline placeholder -- a Belgian Males -- b Immigrant males -- c Belgian females -- d Immigrant females -- 6 Discussion on the findings -- Chapter 13 Key findings and their explanation -- 1 The context of the study
2 Problematic youth group involvement -- 3 Explanatory factors of problematic youth group involvement -- 3.1 Structural background characteristics -- 3.2 Community and micro-place characteristics -- 3.3 Individual characteristics -- 4 Theoretical reflections -- Outline placeholder -- A situational model (situated choice model of problematic youth group involvement and offending) -- A life course developmental model of moral beliefs, the ability to exercise self-control, and a risky lifestyle -- The mechanisms involved in the situational model fit Hedström's DBO scheme -- 5 Future developments of a conditions-controls-exposure model -- References -- Measurement of key constructs -- Chapter Measurement of key constructs -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Scales derived from the youth survey -- 2.1 Background variables -- 2.2 Social bonds -- 2.3 Individual cognitions and individual dispositions -- 2.4 Lifestyle -- 2.5 Street-level social processes -- 3 Reliability and validity of the key informant survey measures -- 3.1 Sample and methodology -- 3.2 Ecological reliability of organizational processes -- 3.3 Ecological construct validity of organizational processes -- 4 Measurement of neighborhood structural characteristics
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
鏈接 Print version: Pauwels, Lieven Problematic Youth Group Involvement as Situated Choice : Testing an Integrated Condition-Controls-Exposure Model Portland : Eleven International Publishing,c2015 9789462365933
主題 Problem children--Case studies
Electronic books
Alt Author Hardyns, Wim
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