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作者 Loewen, James W
書名 Confederate and Neo-Confederate Reader : The "Great Truth" about the "Lost Cause"
出版項 Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2010
©2010
國際標準書號 9781604737882 (electronic bk.)
9781604732191
book jacket
說明 1 online resource (337 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
附註 Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 The Gathering Storm (1787-1860) -- Debate over Slavery at the Constitutional Convention, August 21-22, 1787 -- John C. Calhoun (1782-1850), "On Abolition Petitions," U.S. Senate, February 6, 1837 -- Alabama Platform, February 14-15, 1848 -- John C. Calhoun (1782-1850), "Address to the Southern People," U.S. Senate, January 22, 1849 -- James H. Thornwell (1812-62), The Rights and the Duties of the Masters, May 26, 1850 -- Resolves of the Southern Convention at Nashville, June 10-11, 1850 -- Journal, Resolution, and Ordinance, State Convention of South Carolina, April 26-30, 1852 -- Two Images of Slavery: Confederate 100 Bill (1862) and Obelisk, Fort Mill, South Carolina (1895) -- Samuel A. Cartwright (1793-1863), "Diseases and Peculiarities of the Negro Race," 1851 -- Slave Jail, Alexandria, c. 1859 -- Jefferson Davis (1808-89), "Endorsement" -- T. L. Clingman (1812-97), "Endorsement" -- and J. H. Van Evrie (1814-96), "Negroes and Negro 'Slavery,' The First an Inferior Race-The Latter, Its Normal Condition," 1853 -- George Fitzhugh (1806-81), Cannibals All! Or Slaves Without Masters, 1857 -- Alexander H. Stephens (1812-83), "Speech on the Bill to Admit Kansas as a State under the Topeka Constitution," House of Representatives, June 28, 1856 -- Jefferson Davis (1808-89), Speech at State Fair, Augusta, Maine, September 29, 1858 -- John B. Gordon (1832-1904), "An Address Delivered Before the Thalian & Phi Delta Societies of Oglethorpe University," June 18, 1860 -- CHAPTER 2 Secession (1859-1861) -- South Carolina General Assembly, "Resolutions for a Southern Convention," December 22, 1859 -- Jefferson Davis, Congressional Resolutions on "Relations of States," U.S. Senate, March 1, 1860 -- Official Proceedings of the Democratic Convention, April 28-May 1, 1860
Benjamin Palmer (1818-1902), "Thanksgiving Sermon," November 29, 1860 -- Christiana Banner, 1994 (1911, 1851) -- South Carolina Secession Convention, "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union," December 24, 1860 -- South Carolina Secession Convention, "The Address of the People of South Carolina, Assembled in Convention, To the People of the Slaveholding States of the United States 1861," December 24, 1860 -- Mississippi Secession Convention, "A Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the Federal Union," January 26, 1861 -- Florida Secession Convention, "Cause for Secession," January 7, 1861 -- Alabama Secession Convention, "Resolution of Resistance," January 7, 1861, and "Ordinance of Secession," January 11, 1861 -- Georgia Committee of Seventeen, "Report on Causes for Secession," January 29, 1861 -- Texas Secession Convention, "A Declaration of the Causes Which Impel the State of Texas to Secede from the Federal Union," February 2, 1861 -- George Williamson (1829-82), Louisiana Secession Commissioner, "Letter to President and Gentlemen of the Convention of the People of Texas," February 11, 1861 -- Henry L. Benning (1814-75), "Address Delivered Before the Virginia State Convention," February 18, 1861 -- Virginia Secession Convention, "Resolutions," March 28-April 5, 1861 -- Arkansas Secession Convention, "Resolutions," March 11, 1861 -- Isham Harris (1818-97), Governor of Tennessee, "Message to the Legislature," January 7, 1861 -- John W. Ellis (1820-61), Governor of North Carolina, "Proclamation," April 17, 1861 -- CHAPTER 3 Civil War (1861-1865) -- Jefferson Davis (1808-89), "Farewell to the U.S. Senate," January 21, 1861
Jefferson Davis (1808-89), "Message to the Confederate Congress about Ratification of the Constitution," April 29, 1861 -- The Constitution of the Confederate States of America, March 11, 1861 -- Alexander H. Stephens (1812-83), "African Slavery: The Corner-Stone of the Southern Confederacy," March 22, 1861 -- Governor H. M. Rector (1816-99), Letter to Colonel Sam Leslie, November 28, 1861 -- Three National Flags of the Confederacy, 1861, 1863, 1865 -- William T. Thompson (1812-82), "Proposed Designs for the 2nd National Confederate Flag," April-May 1863 -- Jefferson Davis (1808-89), "Message to the Confederate Congress," January 12, 1863 -- Confederate Congress, "Response of the Confederate Congress to Message from Jefferson Davis on the Emancipation Proclamation," May 1, 1863 -- Richard Taylor (1826-79), Edmund Kirby Smith (1824-93), "Treatment of African American Prisoners of War," June 8, 13, 16, 1863 -- Fort Pillow Massacre, April 12, 1864 -- John R. Eakin (1822-55), "The Slave Soldiers," June 8, 1864 -- Henry Hotze (1833-87), "The Negro's Place in Nature," December 10, 1863 -- Robert E. Lee (1807-70), Letter to Hon. Andrew Hunter, January 11, 1865 -- Macon Telegraph, Editorial Opposing Enlistment of African Americans, January 6, 1865 -- Howell Cobb (1815-68), Letter to James A. Seddon, Secretary of War, January 8, 1865 -- J. H. Stringfellow (1819-1905), Letter to President Jefferson Davis, February 8, 1865 -- General Orders, No. 14, An Act to Increase the Military Force of the Confederate States, approved March 13, 1865 -- CHAPTER 4 Reconstruction and Fusion (1866-1890) -- Edmund Rhett Jr., "Letter to Armistead Burt," October 14, 1865 -- Mississippi's Black Code, November 24-29, 1865 -- Robert E. Lee (1807-70), Testimony before the Congressional Joint Committee on Reconstruction, February 17, 1866
Rushmore G. Horton (1826-68), "A Youth's History of the Great Civil War in the United States from 1861 to 1865," 1867 -- Jack Kershaw (1913- ), Statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, 1998 -- Edward A. Pollard (1831-72), "The Lost Cause Regained," 1868 -- Alexander H. Stephens (1812-83), "Conclusion," A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States, 1868 -- Robert E. Lee (1807-70), "The White Sulphur Manifesto," August 26, 1868 -- John B. Gordon (1832-1904), "To the Colored People," address in Charleston, South Carolina, September 11, 1868 -- Ku Klux Klan Postcard, c. 1937 -- R. L. Dabney (1820-98), "Women's Rights Women," 1871 -- Jubal A. Early (1816-94), "Speech to the Southern Historical Society," August 14, 1873 -- Jefferson Davis (1808-89), "Slavery Not the Cause, but an Incident," 1881 -- CHAPTER 5 The Nadir of Race Relations, 1890-1940 -- J. L. M. Curry (1825-1903), The Southern States of the American Union, 1895 -- Stephen D. Lee (1833-1908), "The Negro Problem," 1899 -- White Mob Burns Black Businesses in Wilmington, North Carolina, November 10, 1898 -- S. A. Cunningham (1843-1913), "M'Kinley, Roosevelt, and the Negro," January 1903 -- S. A. Cunningham, "Problem of the Negroes," January 1907 -- John Sharp Williams (1854-1932), "Issues of the War Discussed," November 1904 -- John Singleton Mosby (1833-1916), Letter to Sam Chapman, July 4, 1907 -- E. H. Hinton (1852-1916), "The Negro and the South: Review of Race Relationships and Conditions," August 1907 -- South Carolina Confederate Women's Monument, 1912 -- C. E. Workman, "Reconstruction Days in South Carolina," July 1921 -- Mildred Rutherford (1852-1928), "The War Was Not a Civil War," January 1923 -- Susan Lawrence Davis (1862-1939), "The First Convention," 1924 -- John E. Rankin (1882-1960), "Forrest at Brice's Cross Roads," August 1925 -- CHAPTER 6 The Civil Rights Era, 1940-
Richard Weaver (1910-63), Selections from The Southern Tradition at Bay, 1943 -- M. Clifford Harrison (1893-1967), "The Southern Confederacy-Dead or Alive?" December 1947 -- Dixiecrat Convention, Birmingham, Alabama, July 1848 -- Birmingham Post Staff Writers, Untitled Sidebars about the Dixiecrat Convention, July 17, 1948 -- Strom Thurmond (1902-2003), "Address to the State Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy at Winthrop College, South Carolina," October 17, 1957 -- Sumter L. Lowry (1893-1985), "The Federal Government and Our Constitutional Rights," Address to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, October 15, 1958 -- The Citizens' Council Logo, March 1957 -- "His Example Inspires Our Efforts of Today," The Citizens' Council, June 1956 -- W. E. Rose, "The Warning of Robert E. Lee," The Citizens' Council, February 1957 -- The Citizens' Councils, "Old Censored Joe," November 1957 -- The Citizens' Councils, "Mau Mau Party," December 1958 -- The Citizens' Council, "Conditions in U.S. Today Offer Alarming Parallel to First Reconstruction Era of a Century Ago," August 1960 -- Richard Quinn (c. 1945- ), "Martin Luther King Day," Fall 1983 -- James Ronald Kennedy (1947- ) and Walter Donald Kennedy (1947- ), "Equality of Opportunity," 1994 -- "Sic Semper Tyrannis" T-shirt, 1999 -- Alister C. Anderson (c. 1924- ), "Address at Arlington National Cemetery," June 6, 1999 -- Moses Ezekiel, Arlington Cemetery Confederate Monument, detail, June 4, 1914 -- Sons of Confederate Veterans, "Postcard Objecting to Mention of Slavery at Civil War Sites," 2000 -- John J. Dwyer (1956- ), "Introduction" to The War Between the States: America's Uncivil War, 2005 -- "Lincoln's Worst Nightmare," 1996-99 -- States Voting for Lincoln (Republican, 1860) and Kerry (Democrat, 2004) -- Sonny Perdue (1946- ), "Confederate History Month Proclamation," March 5, 2008
Frank Conner, "Where We Stand Now: And How We Got Here," September 2003
Most Americans hold basic misconceptions about the Confederacy, the Civil War, and the actions of subsequent neo-Confederates. For example, two thirds of Americans--including most history teachers--think the Confederate States seceded for "states' rights." This error persists because most have never read the key documents about the Confederacy. These documents have always been there. When South Carolina seceded, it published "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union." The document actually opposes states' rights. Its authors argue that Northern states were ignoring the rights of slave owners as identified by Congress and in the Constitution. Similarly, Mississippi's "Declaration of the Immediate Causes " says, "Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery--the greatest material interest of the world." Later documents in this collection show how neo-Confederates obfuscated this truth, starting around 1890. The evidence also points to the centrality of race in neo-Confederate thought even today and to the continuing importance of neo-Confederate ideas in American political life. The 150th anniversary of secession and civil war provides a moment for all Americans to read these documents, properly set in context by award-winning sociologist and historian James W. Loewen and co-editor, Edward H. Sebesta, to put in perspective the mythology of the Old South
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
鏈接 Print version: Loewen, James W. Confederate and Neo-Confederate Reader : The "Great Truth" about the "Lost Cause" Jackson : University Press of Mississippi,c2010 9781604732191
主題 United States -- History.;Confederate States of America -- Sources.;Southern States -- History -- 19th century -- Sources.;Southern States -- History -- 20th century -- Sources.;United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes -- Sources.;United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Influence -- Sources
Electronic books
Alt Author Sebesta, Edward H
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