MARC 主機 00000cam  2200445 i 4500 
001    OCLC894750131 
005    20151201171645.0 
008    150430s2015    cauab    b    001 0 eng   
010    2015002902 
020    9781611329971|q(hardback) 
020    9781611329988|q(paperback) 
035    (OCoLC)ocn894750131  
040    DLC|beng|cDLC|erda|dDLC|dAS 
042    pcc 
043    n-mx--- 
050 00 F1435.3.A37|bF67 2015 
082 00 972/.6|223 
100 1  Ford, Anabel,|eauthor 
245 14 The Maya Forest Garden :|bEight Millennia of Sustainable 
       Cultivation of the Tropical Woodlands /|cAnabel Ford and 
       Ronald Nigh 
264  1 Walnut Creek, California :|bLeft Coast Press, Inc.,
       |c[2015] 
300    260 pages :|billustrations, maps ;|c24 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
490 1  New frontiers in historical ecology ;|vVol. 6 
504    Includes bibliographical references (pages 211-250) and 
       index 
505 0  Introduction. Prosperity across centuries -- Chapter 1. 
       The Context of the Maya Forest -- Chapter 2. Dwelling in 
       the Maya Forest :The high-performance milpa -- Chapter 3. 
       Environmental Change and the Historical Ecology of the 
       Maya Forest -- Chapter 4. Maya Land Use, the Milpa, and 
       Population in the Late Classic Period -- Chapter 5. The 
       Forested Landscape of the Maya -- Chapter 6. Maya 
       Restoration Agriculture as Conservation for the Twenty-
       first Century -- Appendix A. Basket of Mesoamerican 
       Cultivated Plants -- Appendix B. Favored Trees 
520    "The conventional wisdom says that the devolution of 
       Classic Maya civilization occurred because its population 
       grew too large and dense to be supported by primitive 
       neotropical farming methods, resulting in debilitating 
       famines and internecine struggles. Using research on 
       contemporary Maya farming techniques and important new 
       archaeological research, Ford and Nigh refute this 
       Malthusian explanation of events in ancient Central 
       America and posit a radical alternative theory. The 
       authors  show that ancient Maya farmers developed 
       ingenious, sustainable woodland techniques to cultivate 
       numerous food plants (including the staple maize);  
       examine both contemporary tropical farming techniques and 
       the archaeological record (particularly regarding climate)
       to reach their conclusions;  make the argument that these 
       ancient techniques, still in use today, can support 
       significant populations over long periods of time.  "--
       |cProvided by publisher 
520    "The conventional wisdom says that the devolution of 
       classic Maya civilization occurred because its population 
       grew too large and dense to be supported by primitive 
       neotropical farming methods, resulting in debilitating 
       famines and internecine struggles. Using research on 
       contemporary Maya farming techniques and important new 
       archaeological research, Ford and Nigh refute this 
       Malthusian explanation of events in ancient Central 
       America and posit a radical alternative theory. The 
       authors -show that ancient Maya farmers developed 
       ingenious, sustainable woodland techniques to cultivate 
       numerous food plants (including the staple maize); -
       examine both contemporary tropical farming techniques and 
       the archaeological record (particularly regarding climate)
       to reach their conclusions; -make the argument that these 
       ancient techniques, still in use today, can support 
       significant populations over long periods of time"--
       |cProvided by publisher 
650  0 Mayas|xAgriculture 
650  0 Indians of Mexico|xAgriculture 
650  0 Indians of Central America|xAgriculture 
650  7 SOCIAL SCIENCE / Anthropology / General.|2bisacsh 
650  7 SOCIAL SCIENCE / Archaeology.|2bisacsh 
700 1  Nigh, Ronald,|eauthor 
830  0 New frontiers in historical ecology ;|vv. 6 
館藏地 索書號 處理狀態 OPAC 訊息 條碼
 傅斯年圖書館西文圖書區  F1435.3.A37 F699 2015    在架上    30530001220516