MARC 主機 00000nam a2200529 i 4500 
001    978-1-137-48987-6 
003    DE-He213 
005    20161122095123.0 
006    m     o  d         
007    cr nn 008maaau 
008    160621s2016    enk     s         0 eng d 
020    9781137489876|q(electronic bk.) 
020    9781137489852|q(paper) 
024 7  10.1057/978-1-137-48987-6|2doi 
040    GP|cGP|erda|dAS 
041 0  eng 
050  4 HG3754.5.G7|bG63 2016 
082 04 332.742|223 
100 1  Goddard, Richard,|eauthor 
245 10 Credit and trade in later medieval England, 1353-1532 /
       |cby Richard Goddard 
264  1 London :|bPalgrave Macmillan UK :|bImprint: Palgrave 
       Macmillan,|c2016 
300    1 online resource (xv, 277 pages) :|billustrations, map, 
       digital ;|c22 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
347    text file|bPDF|2rda 
490 1  Palgrave studies in the history of finance 
505 0  Chapter 1) The Statute Staple and Trade Finance in Later 
       Medieval England -- Chapter 2) Merchants and Trade -- 
       Chapter 3) Boom and Bust: Patterns of Borrowing in Later 
       Medieval England -- Chapter 4) The Geography of Recession:
       Provincial Credit in Later Medieval England -- Chapter 5) 
       London: The Commercial Powerhouse -- Chapter 6) 
       Conclusions 
520    This book challenges the notion that economic crises are 
       modern phenomena through its exploration of the tumultuous
       'credit-crunch' of the later Middle Ages. It illustrates 
       clearly how influences such as the Black Death, inter-
       European warfare, climate change and a bullion famine 
       occasioned severe and prolonged economic decline across 
       fifteenth century England. Early chapters discuss trends 
       in lending and borrowing, and the use of credit to fund 
       domestic trade through detailed analysis of the Statute 
       Staple and rich primary sources. The author then adopts a 
       broad-based geographic lens to examine provincial credit 
       before focusing on London's development as the commercial 
       powerhouse in late medieval business. Academics and 
       students of modern economic change and historic financial 
       revolutions alike will see that the years from 1353 to 
       1532 encompassed immense upheaval and change, reminiscent 
       of modern recessions. The author carefully guides the 
       reader to see that these shifts are the precursors of 
       economic change in the early modern period, laying the 
       foundations for the financial world as we know it today 
650  0 Credit|zEngland|xHistory|yTo 1500 
650 14 Finance 
650 24 Financial History 
650 24 Financial Accounting 
650 24 Trade 
650 24 History of Medieval Europe 
650 24 Social History 
650 24 History of Britain and Ireland 
651  0 England|xCommerce|xHistory|yTo 1500 
710 2  SpringerLink (Online service) 
773 0  |tSpringer eBooks 
830  0 Palgrave studies in the history of finance 
856 40 |uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-48987-6
       |zeBook(Springerlink)