Author Anderson, Elizabeth Jean
Title Remediation or enrichment? More than semantics: An intervention designed for adolescent girls diagnosed with learning disabilities
book jacket
Descript 349 p
Note Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 65-09, Section: A, page: 3311
Chair: Lily Wong Fillmore
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Berkeley, 2004
This three-year ethnographic study examines the experiences of 23 girls who had been placed in special education settings for most of their school lives with diagnoses of learning disabilities or emotional disturbance. The study traces their educational careers from kindergarten through high school, where they were identified as the students most likely to fail out of the entire student body. In the process, it examines both the initial triggers that caused the students to be removed from the mainstream setting, and the role the educational system played in reifying identified disabilities, because of assumptions about ethnic backgrounds, gender, language learning, and behaviors conducive to school success. In turn, it looks at how the low expectations of school personnel, which followed the students' special education placements, served to limit growth and learning in what became a vicious, and seemingly inescapable, cycle
The second half of the dissertation describes how a program was created, drawing on Lily Wong Fillmore's work on the social nature of language learning, and Marian Diamond's work on the role of environment in cortical growth, to explore whether it would be possible to give such students a "jumpstart" which would allow them to reconnect to educational success. The focus of the program was on "enrichment" rather than "remediation" per se. The girls' experiences, which culminated in five students enrolling in a community college class, are presented and discussed
School code: 0028
DDC
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 65-09A
Subject Education, Language and Literature
Education, Special
Education, Teacher Training
0279
0529
0530
Alt Author University of California, Berkeley