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Author Paul, Michael J., author
Title Social monitoring for public health / Michael J. Paul, Mark Dredze
Imprint [San Rafael, California] : Morgan & Claypool, 2017
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (xix, 163 pages) : illustrations
text rdacontent
electronic isbdmedia
online resource rdacarrier
Series Synthesis lectures on information concepts, retrieval, and services, 1947-9468 ; # 60
Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science
Synthesis lectures on information concepts, retrieval, and services ; # 60. 1947-9468
Note Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science
Includes bibliographical references (pages 99-162)
1. A new source of big data --
2. Public health: a primer -- 2.1 The public health cycle -- 2.1.1 Public health surveillance -- 2.2 Sources of data -- 2.2.1 Limitations of traditional data -- 2.2.2 Opportunities for social monitoring --
3. Social data -- 3.1 What is social data? -- 3.2 Monitoring of social data -- 3.2.1 Active vs. passive monitoring -- 3.2.2 Types of users -- 3.3 Types of platforms -- 3.3.1 General-purpose social media -- 3.3.2 Domain-specific social media -- 3.3.3 Search and browsing activity -- 3.3.4 Crowds and markets -- 3.3.5 Comparison of platforms -- 3.4 Types of data -- 3.4.1 Content -- 3.4.2 Metadata -- 3.4.3 Social network structure -- 3.5 Data collection --
4. Methods of monitoring -- 4.1 Quantitative analysis -- 4.1.1 Content analysis and filtering -- 4.1.2 Trend inference -- 4.1.3 Individual analysis -- 4.1.4 Validation -- 4.2 Qualitative analysis -- 4.2.1 Validation -- 4.3 Study design -- 4.3.1 Study population -- 4.3.2 Causality -- 4.3.3 Cross-sectional vs. longitudinal analysis --
5. Public health applications -- 5.1 Disease surveillance -- 5.1.1 Influenza -- 5.1.2 Other infectious diseases -- 5.1.3 Non-infectious diseases and chronic illness -- 5.1.4 Systems and resources -- 5.2 Behavioral medicine -- 5.2.1 Diet and fitness -- 5.2.2 Substance use -- 5.2.3 Disease prevention and awareness -- 5.3 Environmental and urban health -- 5.3.1 Disaster and emergency response -- 5.3.2 Foodborne illness -- 5.3.3 Air quality -- 5.3.4 Climate change -- 5.3.5 Gun violence -- 5.4 Healthcare quality and safety -- 5.4.1 Healthcare quality -- 5.4.2 Medication safety -- 5.5 Mental health -- 5.5.1 Depression -- 5.5.2 Suicide and self-harm -- 5.5.3 Mood -- 5.5.4 Other mental health issues --
6. Limitations and concerns -- 6.1 Methodological limitations -- 6.1.1 Limitations of self-reported data -- 6.1.2 Sampling and sample size -- 6.1.3 Reliability of third-party data -- 6.1.4 Adversarial concerns -- 6.1.5 Bias -- 6.2 Actionability concerns -- 6.2.1 Current use by practitioners -- 6.2.2 Reliability of web intelligence -- 6.2.3 Utility of web intelligence -- 6.2.4 Decisions and interventions -- 6.3 Ethical considerations -- 6.3.1 Public data -- 6.3.2 User interaction -- 6.3.3 Guidelines for ethical research --
7. Looking ahead -- Bibliography -- Authors' biographies
Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers
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Mode of access: World Wide Web
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader
Public health thrives on high-quality evidence, yet acquiring meaningful data on a population remains a central challenge of public health research and practice. Social monitoring, the analysis of social media and other user-generated web data, has brought advances in the way we leverage population data to understand health. Social media offers advantages over traditional data sources, including real-time data availability, ease of access, and reduced cost. Social media allows us to ask, and answer, questions we never thought possible. This book presents an overview of the progress on uses of social monitoring to study public health over the past decade. We explain available data sources, common methods, and survey research on social monitoring in a wide range of public health areas. Our examples come from topics such as disease surveillance, behavioral medicine, and mental health, among others. We explore the limitations and concerns of these methods. Our survey of this exciting new field of data-driven research lays out future research directions
Also available in print
Title from PDF title page (viewed on September 1, 2017)
Link Print version: 9781681730950
Subject Social media in medicine
Public health -- Data processing
Social Media
Public Health -- methods
social media
web data
public health
data science
Electronic books
Alt Author Dredze, Mark, author
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