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Author Linville, Jeff D
Title Timber Construction Manual
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2012
©2012
book jacket
Edition 6th ed
Descript 1 online resource (662 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Timber Construction Manual -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Timber Construction -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Materials -- 1.2.1 Lumber -- 1.2.2 Structural Glued Laminated Timber -- 1.2.3 Heavy Timber Decking -- 1.2.4 Structural Panels -- 1.2.5 Round Timbers -- 1.3 Structural Systems -- 1.3.1 Post and Beam -- 1.3.2 Light Frame Construction -- 1.3.3 Pole Construction -- 1.3.4 Post-Frame Construction -- 1.3.5 Timber Piles -- 1.3.6 Trusses -- 1.3.7 Structural Glued Laminated Timber Arches -- 1.3.8 Diaphragms and Shear Walls -- 1.4 Economy -- 1.4.1 Standard Sizes -- 1.4.2 Volumetric Measure -- 1.4.3 Standard Connection Details -- 1.4.4 Framing Systems -- 1.4.5 Structural Grades -- 1.4.6 Appearance Grades for Structural Glued Laminated Timber -- 1.5 Permanence -- 1.5.1 Wood Decay -- 1.5.2 Mold and Fungal Stains -- 1.5.3 Insects -- 1.5.4 Marine Borers -- 1.5.5 Temperature -- 1.5.6 Chemical Environments -- 1.6 Seasoning -- 1.6.1 Checking -- 1.6.2 Shrinkage -- 1.7 Handling, Storage, and Erection -- 1.7.1 Handling -- 1.7.2 Storage -- 1.7.3 Assembly -- 1.7.4 Erection -- 1.7.5 Bracing -- 1.7.6 Field Cuts -- 1.7.7 Moisture Control -- 1.8 Conclusion -- Chapter 2 Wood Properties -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.1.1 Hardwoods and Softwoods -- 2.1.2 Heartwood and Sapwood -- 2.1.3 Earlywood and Latewood -- 2.1.4 Grain and Texture -- 2.1.5 Moisture Content -- 2.1.6 Growth Characteristics -- 2.1.7 Directional Properties -- 2.2 Specific Gravity and Specific Weight of Commercial Lumber Species -- 2.2.1 Effect of Adhesives and Preservative Treatments -- 2.3 Dimensional Changes Due to Moisture and Temperature -- 2.3.1 Moisture Content and Shrinkage -- 2.3.2 Dimensional Changes Due to Temperature -- 2.4 Thermal Insulating Properties -- 2.5 Wood in Chemical Environments -- 2.6 Acoustical Properties -- 2.7 Electrical Properties -- 2.8 Coefficient of Friction
2.9 Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Timber Design -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Loads -- 3.2.1 Dead Loads -- 3.2.2 Live Loads -- 3.2.3 Snow Loads -- 3.2.4 Wind Loads -- 3.2.5 Earthquake Loads -- 3.2.6 Highway Loads -- 3.2.7 Railway Loads -- 3.2.8 Crane Loads -- 3.2.9 Dynamic Loads -- 3.2.10 Load Combinations -- 3.2.11 Design Stresses -- 3.3 Design Values -- 3.3.1 Strength Design Values -- 3.3.2 Modulus of Elasticity Design Values -- 3.4 Adjustment Factors -- 3.4.1 Load Duration Factor, CD -- 3.4.2 Wet Service Factor, CM -- 3.4.3 Factors Related to Size and Shape -- 3.4.4 Repetitive Member Factor, Cr -- 3.4.5 Temperature Factor, Ct -- 3.4.6 Bearing Area Factor, Cb -- 3.4.7 Adjustments for Treatments -- 3.4.8 Other Adjustment Factors -- 3.4.9 Summary and Application of Adjustment Factors -- 3.5 Deflection -- 3.6 Camber -- 3.7 Ponding -- 3.8 Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Timber Beams -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Structural Evaluation of Beams -- 4.2.1 Bending (Flexure) -- 4.2.2 Shear Parallel-to-Grain -- 4.2.3 Deflection -- 4.3 Simple Beams -- 4.3.1 Beams with Continuous Lateral Support -- 4.3.2 Upside-Down Installation -- 4.3.3 Continuous Bracing versus Repetitive Discrete Bracing -- 4.3.4 Unbraced Beams and Partially Braced Beams -- 4.4 Continuous Members -- 4.5 Biaxial Bending (Bending about Both Axes) -- 4.6 Torsion -- 4.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 5 Timber Columns and Tension Members -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Column Design Criteria -- 5.3 Rectangular Columns -- 5.3.1 Sawn Lumber Columns -- 5.3.2 Glulam Columns -- 5.4 Round Columns -- 5.5 Tapered Columns -- 5.6 Spaced Columns -- 5.7 Built-Up Columns -- 5.7.1 Nailed Built-up Columns -- 5.7.2 Bolted Built-up Columns -- 5.8 Columns with Flanges -- 5.9 Tension Members -- 5.10 Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Timber Beam-Columns and Tension Beams -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.1.1 Application of Volume Factor for Beam-Columns
6.1.2 End Eccentricity -- 6.1.3 Unbalanced or Cambered Glulam Members -- 6.2 General Equation for Beam-Columns -- 6.3 Centric Axial Compression and Side Load Bending about Both Axes -- 6.4 Centric Axial Compression and Side Load Bending about Strong Axis Only -- 6.5 Eccentric Axial Compression Only -- 6.6 Axial Compression Eccentricity in Strong Direction Only -- 6.7 Columns with Side Brackets -- 6.8 Combined Axial Tension and Bending -- 6.9 Conclusion -- Chapter 7 Tapered Beams -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.1.1 Stress Interaction, Volume, and Beam Stability Factors -- 7.1.2 Field Taper versus Manufactured Taper -- 7.1.3 Camber in Tapered Beams -- 7.2 Tapered Beam Design -- 7.2.1 End Depth Based on Shear -- 7.2.2 Location of Maximum Bending Stress -- 7.3 Beams with Tapered End Cuts -- 7.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 8 Curved Glulam Beams -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 Shear Reduction Factor, Cvr -- 8.1.2 Curvature Factor, Cc -- 8.1.3 Minimum Radii of Curvature -- 8.1.4 Radial Stresses -- 8.1.5 Radial Reinforcement -- 8.2 Curved Beams with Constant Depth -- 8.2.1 Radial Stress -- 8.2.2 Flexure -- 8.2.3 Deflection -- 8.3 Pitched and Tapered Curved Beams -- 8.3.1 Radial Stress -- 8.3.2 Bending Stress -- 8.3.4 Design Procedure for Pitched and Tapered Curved Beams -- 8.4 Pitched and Tapered Curved Beams with Mechanically Attached Haunch -- 8.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 9 Glulam Arches -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Preliminary Design Procedure -- 9.2.1 Choose Angles of Taper, Radius of Curvature, Wall Height, Peak Height, Span, and Arch Width -- 9.2.2 Choose Material Properties (Species, Design Stresses: Fbx, Fvx) -- 9.2.3 Locate Approximate Tangent Points -- 9.2.4 Calculate the Reactions and Pin Forces for Balanced and Unbalanced Snow Loads -- 9.2.5 Estimate the Required Depth at the Lower Tangent Point, dLT -- 9.2.6 Estimate the Required Depth at the Base
9.2.7 Estimate the Required Depth at the Crown -- 9.2.8 Finalize Trial Geometry and Draw Arch to Scale -- 9.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 10 Heavy Timber Decking -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Installation Requirements -- 10.2.1 Nailing Schedule -- 10.2.2 Moisture Content -- 10.2.3 Installation Patterns -- 10.3 Design Formulas -- 10.4 Section Properties -- 10.5 Decking Design Values -- 10.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 11 Connections in Timber Structures -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Connection Detailing Principles -- 11.2.1 Accommodating Member Shrinkage -- 11.2.2 Avoiding Tension Perpendicular-to-Grain Loading -- 11.2.3 Minimizing Moisture Problems -- 11.2.4 Construction Documents -- 11.3 Types of Fasteners -- 11.3.1 Dowel-Type Fasteners -- 11.3.2 Shear Plates and Split Rings -- 11.3.3 Other Fasteners -- 11.3.4 Wood Joinery -- 11.4 Reference Design Values for Fasteners -- 11.4.1 Specific Gravity -- 11.4.2 Angle of Load to Grain -- 11.5 Adjustment Factors -- 11.5.1 Load Duration Factor, CD -- 11.5.2 Wet-Service Factor, CM -- 11.5.3 Temperature Factor, Ct -- 11.5.4 Group Action Factor, Cg -- 11.5.5 Geometry Factor, C -- 11.5.6 Penetration Depth Factor, Cd -- 11.5.7 End Grain Factor, Ceg -- 11.5.8 Metal Side Plate Factor, Cst -- 11.5.9 Diaphragm Factor, Cdi -- 11.5.10 Toenail Factor, Ctn -- 11.5.11 Effect of Treatment -- 11.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 12 Member Capacity at Connections -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Member Capacity at Connections Loaded Perpendicular-to-Grain -- 12.2.1 Bearing Connection with Unaltered Cross-Section -- 12.2.2 Bearing Connection with Tension-Face Notch -- 12.2.3 Bearing Connection with Compression-Face Notch -- 12.2.4 Connections Using Mechanical Fasteners -- 12.3 Member Capacity at Connections Loaded Parallel-to-Grain -- 12.3.1 Net Section Fracture -- 12.3.2 Row Tear-Out -- 12.3.3 Group Tear-Out
12.3.4 Design to Prevent Row and Group Tear-Out -- 12.4 Member Capacity at Connections Loaded at an Angle to Grain -- 12.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 13 Dowel-Type Fasteners -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Dowel-Type Fasteners Loaded Laterally -- 13.2.1 Special Considerations for Lag Screws and Wood Screws -- 13.2.2 Special Considerations for Nails and Spikes -- 13.2.3 Geometry Factor for Bolts, Lag Screws, and Drift Pins -- 13.2.4 Single Shear Connections -- 13.2.5 Double Shear Connections -- 13.2.6 Metal to Wood Connections -- 13.2.7 Wood to Concrete Connections -- 13.3 Dowel-Type Fasteners Loaded in Withdrawal -- 13.3.1 Placement of Fasteners for Withdrawal -- 13.3.2 Withdrawal from End Grain -- 13.4 Dowel-Type Fasteners Loaded Laterally and in Withdrawal -- 13.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 14 Shear Plates and Split Rings -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Connectors in Side Grain -- 14.2.1 Reference Design Values -- 14.2.2 Metal Side Plate Factor for Shear Plates -- 14.2.3 Geometry Factor, C , for Split Rings and Shear Plates -- 14.3 Timber Connectors in End Grain -- 14.3.1 Design Values for Connectors in End Grain -- 14.3.2 Geometry Factor for Connectors in End Grain -- 14.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 15 Moment Splices -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Shear Transfer -- 15.3 Moment Transfer -- 15.3.1 Elastic Analysis of the Uncut Section -- 15.3.2 Fastener Stiffness and Placement -- 15.3.3 Neutral Axis Location and Force Distribution -- 15.3.4 Evaluation of Connection -- 15.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 16 Load and Resistance Factor Design -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Design Values and Adjustment Factors -- 16.2.1 Time Effect Factor -- 16.2.2 Format Conversion Factors for Use with NDS -- 16.2.3 Resistance Factors -- 16.2.4 Applicability of Adjustment Factors -- 16.3 Design Checks -- 16.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 17 Timber Bridges -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Types of Timber Bridges
17.2.1 Trestles
THE DEFINITIVE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY SOURCE FOR BUILDING WITH WOOD- NOW IN A THOROUGHLY UPDATED SIXTH EDITION Since its first publication in 1966, Timber Construction Manual has become the essential design and construction industry resource for building with structural glued laminated timber. Timber Construction Manual, Sixth Edition provides architects, engineers, contractors, educators, and related professionals with up-to-date information on engineered timber construction, including the latest codes, construction methods, and authoritative design recommendations. Content has been reorganized to flow easily from information on wood properties and applications to specific design considerations. Based on the most reliable technical data available, this edition has been thoroughly revised to encompass: A thorough update of all recommended design criteria for timber structural members, systems, and connections An expanded collection of real-world design examples supported with detailed schematic drawings New material on the role of glulam in sustainable building practices The latest design and construction codes, including the 2012 National Design Specification for Wood Construction, AITC 117-2010, and examples featuring ASCE 7-10 and IBC 2009 More cross-referencing to other available AITC standards on the AITC website Since 1952, the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF TIMBER CONSTRUCTION has been the national technical trade association of the structural glued laminated timber industry. AITC-recommended building and design codes for wood-based structures are considered authoritative in the United States building industry
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Linville, Jeff D. Timber Construction Manual Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2012 9780470545096
Subject Building, Wooden -- Handbooks, manuals, etc
Electronic books
Alt Author (AITC), American Institute of Timber Construction
(AITC), American Institute of Timber Construction
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