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Author Baker, Hallie Elizabeth
Title A life course disability model for understanding aging with a chronic condition
book jacket
Descript 97 p
Note Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 70-09, Section: B, page: 5408
Adviser: Suzanne R. Kunkel
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Miami University, 2009
The current research project seeks to understand aging with a disability or chronic condition as a life-long process occurring for an increasing number of individuals in the United States. For individuals aging with chronic conditions or a disability, factors beside age influence the likelihood of developing a change in health status in later life. The primary research questions ask: (1) What factors influence a change in health status for individuals aging with a potentially disabling condition (e.g. polio)? and (2) Does age maintain power as a predictor or explanatory factor as additional life course and health factors are added to the model? To answer the research questions, a new model of disability was developed using polio survivors as a basis. Combining Verbrugge and Jette's disablement process model and the life course perspective, the life course disability model predicts five categories of factors as influencing the likelihood of an individual developing a change in health status in later life. The five categories of factors include antecedent, extra-individual, risk, intra-individual, and condition-specific. Using a three-phase analysis, first the group of individuals experiencing a change in health status was compared to their peer group without a change in health. Next, the five categories of factors were modeled using logistic regression to determine their explanatory power. Finally, all categories of factors were modeled to test how well the life course disability model explained variation within the sample. Although all models were significant, the final results of the regression models demonstrated the life course disability model's ability to explain up to 33% of the variation in the sample. Additionally, age was not a statistically significant factor in a majority of the models predicting the likelihood of developing a change in health status in later life. Thus, support is found for using the life course model of disability to examine the accumulation of factors which influence the likelihood of developing a change in health status in later life
School code: 0126
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 70-09B
Subject Gerontology
Health Sciences, Aging
0351
0493
Alt Author Miami University
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