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Author Bavin, Edith L
Title Acquisition of Ergativity
Imprint Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (347 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Trends in Language Acquisition Research ; v.9
Trends in Language Acquisition Research
Note The Acquisition of Ergativity -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- The acquisition of ergativity -- Introduction -- Acquiring ergativity: Some challenges -- Semantic bootstrapping hypothesis -- Universal vs. language specific -- When ergative alignment applies: Split systems -- Identifying the argument structure of verbs -- The social context of acquisition -- Overview of the volume -- Final comment -- References -- Ergativity -- Introduction -- Alignment types -- Semantic alignment -- Symmetric alignment -- Alignment splits -- Syntactic alignment biases -- Some diachronic issues -- Conclusions -- References -- Ergativity in child Basque -- Introduction -- Ergativity in Basque -- Basque case marking -- Basque verbal morphology -- Basque word order -- The development of case and agreement in child Basque -- Factors which influence morphological development -- Phonological difficulty -- Morphological complexity -- Input frequency -- Research questions -- Methods -- Participants -- Procedures -- Data analyses -- Results -- Verbal agreement errors -- Case errors -- Discussion and conclusions -- Appendix -- References -- The acquisition of ergativity in Inuktitut -- Introduction -- Structure of Inuktitut -- Study 1: Ergativity in child spontaneous speech -- Participants -- Data collection and preparation -- Data coding -- Results and discussion -- Alternatives options for expressing bivalent propositions -- Study 2: Ergativity in caregiver spontaneous speech -- Participants -- Data collection, preparation, and coding -- Results and discussion -- Study 3: Ergativity in elicited narratives -- Participants -- Data collection -- Data coding -- Results and discussion -- Comparison across three data types -- Study 4: Ergativity in West Greenlandic child spontaneous speech -- General discussion -- References
Appendix 1: Elicited Narrative from Grade 3 Participant (SJ) -- The acquisition of ergative case in Warlpiri -- Introduction -- Ergative morphology -- The cross-referencing system -- Possible factors influencing the acquisition of ergative morphology -- The data -- Data set 1: Spontaneous speech -- Data analysis -- Results -- Development over 13-14 months -- Adult input -- Case allomorphs -- Data set 2: Elicited narratives -- Book one -- Book two -- Summary and conclusions -- References -- The acquisition of ergative marking in Kaluli, Ku Waru and Duna (Trans New Guinea) -- Introduction -- Some typological features of Trans New Guinea languages -- Kaluli -- Introduction to the language -- Ergativity in Kaluli -- Ergative marking on nouns, proper names, and demonstratives -- Ergative marking on personal pronouns -- Acquisition of Kaluli ergative marking -- Acquisition of the ergative marker -ya: -- Acquisition of ergative personal pronouns -- Cues for appropriate use of ergative marking -- The Kaluli interactional setting -- Ku Waru -- Introduction to the language -- Ergativity in Ku Waru -- Acquisition of Ku Waru ergative marking -- The role of adult input -- Baby ergative form -- Overextensions -- Co-construction of an ergative-marked clause -- Other uses of ergative marking -- Conclusions regarding Ku Waru language socialisation -- Duna -- Introduction to the language -- Ergativity in Duna -- Duna ergative marking in child language -- Comments on Duna adult input and language socialisation -- Discussion -- Formal similarities and differences -- The interactional setting -- Further questions -- References -- The acquisition of ergative case in Chintang -- Introduction -- Chintang: Grammatical background -- Verbs and verbal agreement -- Nouns and case marking of core arguments -- Theoretical expectations and hypotheses
Reliance on frequency and saliency -- Functional learning -- Item-speci c learning -- Interactional learning -- Participants, recordings and data overview -- Study 1: Overall usage of ergatives by children and adults -- Methods -- Results -- Study 2: Functional learning -- Methods -- Results -- Study 3: Item-speci c learning -- Methods -- Results -- Study 4: Interactional learning -- Methods -- Results -- Conclusions -- References -- Ergative case-marking in Hindi child-caregiver speech -- Introduction -- Acquiring case-marking in Hindi -- Split-S marking -- Split-accusative marking -- Verb semantics -- Patterns of verbal agreement -- Argument ellipsis -- Light verbs -- Dialectal variation -- Ergative case-marking in caregivers' input -- Coding -- Results -- Verbs -- A- and O-role arguments -- Verb inflection and light verbs -- Ergative case-marking in Hindi child language -- Verbs -- A- and O-role arguments -- Verb inflection and light verbs -- Summary and discussion -- References -- The acquisition of split-ergative case marking in Kurmanji Kurdish -- Introduction -- Kurmanji Kurdish and split-ergativity -- Split-ergative case marking in Kurmanji -- Acquisition of Kurmanji-split-ergative case marking -- Naturalistic speech study -- Results for caregivers -- Results for developmental pattern in children -- Elicited production task study -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A: Elicited production task transitive target sentences -- The acquisition of agreement in four Mayan languages -- Introduction -- Overview of agreement morphology in Mayan verbs -- Data and method -- Results -- Ergative agreement -- Ergative subject agreement -- Ergative possessor agreement -- Ergative subjects vs. possessors -- Errors in ergative marking -- Summary: Acquisition of ergative marking -- Absolutive agreement
Absolutive subject agreement on verbs -- Absolutive vs. ergative subjects -- Absolutive object agreement -- Absolutive subjects vs. objects -- Summary: Absolutives -- Agreement and status -- Discussion -- Conclusions -- References -- Appendix: Summary table of verb types in the data for all 4 languages -- The acquisition of extended ergativity in Mam, Q'anjob'al and Yucatec -- Introduction -- Contexts of extended ergativity -- Method -- The language samples -- Input analysis -- The intransitive hypothesis -- The ergative hypothesis -- The acquisition of extended ergativity -- Mam -- Q'anjob'al -- Yucatec -- The comparative analysis -- Conclusion -- References -- Index
Ergativity in Mayan languages is realized in the cross-referencing features on verbs rather than as case marking features on noun phrases. Overt absolutive markers appear with intransitive verbs. Some Mayan languages extend the ergative markers to intransitive verbs in aspectless complement clauses. The languages also make changes to transitive verbs in the same aspectless contexts. We evaluate how Mam, Q'anjob'al and Yucatec children acquire the extension of the ergative markers to intransitive verbs and the changes to transitive verbs in aspectless clauses. In each language we analyzed data of three children in the age range of 2;0 to 3;0. Our findings show that: (i) although the three languages have similar patterns of extended ergativity, children are sensitive to language-specific constraints on extended ergativity; (ii) the input frequency does not predict the acquisition of extended ergativity. We conclude that the structure of each language is responsible for the acquisition of extended ergativity
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Bavin, Edith L. Acquisition of Ergativity Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2013 9789027234797
Subject High technology industries -- Government policy -- Brazil.;Automation -- Economic aspects -- Brazil
Electronic books
Alt Author Stoll, Sabine
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