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Author Proudfoot, Anna
Title Modern Italian Grammar : A Practical Guide
Imprint London : Taylor & Francis Group, 2012
©2013
book jacket
Edition 3rd ed
Descript 1 online resource (401 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Modern Grammars Ser
Modern Grammars Ser
Note Cover -- Modern Italian Grammar -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction -- How to use this book -- Glossary -- Part A Structures -- 1 The noun group -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 The noun -- 1.3 The article -- 1.4 The adjective -- 1.5 Agreement of noun, article and adjective -- 2 Verbs -- 2.1 General features of verbs -- 2.2 Individual verb moods and tenses -- 3 Pronouns -- 3.1 What is a pronoun? -- 3.2 Personal pronouns: introduction -- 3.3 Stressed personal pronouns -- 3.4 Unstressed personal pronouns -- 3.5 Relative pronouns -- 3.6 Interrogative pronouns and adjectives -- 3.7 Possessive pronouns and adjectives -- 3.8 Demonstrative pronouns and adjectives -- 3.9 Indefinite pronouns and adjectives -- 3.10 Pronouns and adjectives of quantity -- 4 Prepositions -- 4.1 What is a preposition? -- 4.2 Combined prepositions and articles -- 4.3 Common prepositions used with nouns -- 4.4 Common prepositions used with verbs -- 4.5 Other prepositions -- 5 Conjunctions -- 5.1 What is a conjunction? -- 5.2 Coordinating conjunctions -- 5.3 Subordinating conjunctions -- 6 Adverbs -- 6.1 What is an adverb? -- 6.2 Formation of adverbs -- 6.3 Functions of adverbs -- 6.4 Comparative and superlative adverbs -- 7 Numbers -- 7.1 What is a number? -- 7.2 Cardinal numbers -- 7.3 Ordinal numbers -- 7.4 Calculations -- 7.5 Percentages -- 7.6 Collective and approximate numbers -- 7.7 Dates -- 7.8 Time -- 7.9 Weights and measures -- 7.10 Currency -- 7.11 Table of numbers -- Part B Functions -- I Giving and seeking factual information -- 8 Identification: giving personal information -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Tu or Lei? -- 8.3 Giving different kinds of personal information -- 8.4 Emphasising the person referred to -- 8.5 Eliciting personal information -- 8.6 Dialoghi -- 9 Specifying people or objects -- 9.1 Introduction
9.2 Specifying a known or particular person or object -- 9.3 Specifying a category or type -- 9.4 Specifying ownership -- 10 Describing people or things -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Physical characteristics -- 10.3 Non-physical characteristics -- 10.4 Position of adjectives -- 10.5 Intensifying the meaning of the adjective -- 10.6 Diminishing the intensity of the adjective -- 10.7 Essere, stare -- 10.8 Dialogo -- 11 Talking about existence, occurrence and availability -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Talking about existence and/or presence -- 11.3 Talking about occurrence -- 11.4 Talking about presence, attendance and participation at an event -- 11.5 Talking about availability -- 11.6 Expressing 'some, any' -- 11.7 Specifying the quantity available -- 11.8 Expressing 'something/anything', 'someone/anyone' -- 11.9 Specifying location, time or frequency -- 11.10 Expressing non-existence or non-availability -- 12 Talking about the present -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Describing present situations, actions and events -- 12.3 Expressing ongoing actions -- 12.4 Words and phrases indicating present time -- 12.5 Dialogo -- 13 Speaking and writing about the past -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Passato prossimo and passato remoto -- 13.3 Using the passato prossimo -- 13.4 Using the passato remoto -- 13.5 Using the imperfetto -- 13.6 Combinations of perfect and imperfect tenses -- 13.7 Present tense expressing past -- 13.8 Indicators of past time -- 14 Talking about the future -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Using the future tense -- 14.3 Using the present tense -- 14.4 Indicators of future time -- 14.5 Expressing the immediate or very near future -- 14.6 Expressing the English 'going to' -- 14.7 The 'past in the future' -- 14.8 The future seen from the past -- 14.9 Expressing intention and future plans -- 15 Asking questions -- 15.1 Introduction
15.2 Asking a question using interrogative intonation -- 15.3 Asking a question using interrogative words -- 15.4 Dialogo -- 16 Negative sentences -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Reinforcing a negative statement -- 16.3 Expressing negation using niente, nulla -- 16.4 Expressing negation using the pronoun nessuno/a -- 16.5 Expressing negation using the adjective nessun/o/a -- 16.6 Other negative elements non . . . mai, non . . . ancora, non . . . più -- 16.7 Expressing negation using né . . . né -- 16.8 Omitting non -- 16.9 Specifying negation with a che clause -- 17 Comparisons and degrees of intensity -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Using comparative adjectives and adverbs -- 17.3 Expressing 'than' -- 17.4 Expressing 'which' -- 17.5 Expressing different degrees of intensity -- 18 Referring to objects and people -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Using a pronoun to refer back -- 18.3 Using a pronoun: referring to the subject of the action -- 18.4 Using a pronoun: referring to the object of the action -- 18.5 Referring to someone or something using questo, quello -- 18.6 Using indefinite pronouns to refer to someone/something -- 18.7 Referring to something or someone mentioned -- 18.8 Referring to what has been said or will be said -- 19 Focusing on the action -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Focusing on the action using the passive -- 19.3 Situations when the passive is not used -- 19.4 Focusing on the action using si passivante (passive form with si) -- 19.5 Si impersonale (impersonal si) -- 19.6 Focusing on the object of the action -- II Actions affecting ourselves and others -- 20 Social interactions -- 20.1 Greeting, welcoming -- 20.2 Introducing oneself and others -- 20.3 Saying goodbye -- 20.4 Wishes -- 20.5 Expressing and receiving thanks, appreciation -- 20.6 Compliments and congratulations -- 20.7 Making and accepting excuses, apologies
20.8 Expressing commiseration, sympathy -- 20.9 Using titles, salutations -- 21 Getting other people to do things -- 21.1 Introduction -- 21.2 Giving orders and commands -- 21.3 Making negative requests and commands -- 21.4 Written instructions and recipes -- 21.5 Asking someone to do something -- 21.6 Giving an order using 'command' verbs -- 21.7 Far fare, lasciar fare -- 21.8 Using persuasion -- 21.9 Monologo -- 22 Permission and possibility -- 22.1 Asking or granting permission -- 22.2 Denying permission -- 22.3 Speaking about the ability or opportunity to do something -- 22.4 Making a request -- 23 Expressing need, obligation or desire -- 23.1 Introduction -- 23.2 Expressing wants -- 23.3 Expressing needs -- 24 Suggesting, proposing, advising and recommending -- 24.1 Giving advice -- 24.2 Making a suggestion -- 24.3 Choices -- 24.4 More expressions of advising or suggesting -- 24.5 Advising someone not to do something, giving a warning -- 24.6 Asking for advice -- III Expressing emotions, feelings, attitudes and opinions -- 25 Expressing emotions: positive, negative, other -- 25.1 Introduction -- 25.2 Interjections (positive, negative, other) -- 25.3 Expressing positive emotions -- 25.4 Expressing negative emotions -- 25.5 Expressing other emotions -- 26 Expressing emotions: hope, fear, doubt -- 26.1 Introduction -- 26.2 Expressing hope -- 26.3 Expressing fear, pessimism or regret -- 26.4 Expressing doubt -- 27 Expressing an opinion or belief, agreement or disagreement -- 27.1 Expressing or seeking an opinion or belief -- 27.2 Expressing agreement, disagreement -- 28 Indicating preference, likes and dislikes -- 28.1 Introduction -- 28.2 Expressing likes -- 28.3 Expressing dislikes -- 28.4 Expressing a preference -- 29 Expressing certainty and knowledge -- 29.1 Introduction -- 29.2 Sapere -- 29.3 Essere certo, sicuro, convinto
29.4 Non . . . certo, poco certo, incerto, poco sicuro -- 29.5 Pensare, credere, sembrare, parere -- 29.6 Ricordare, dimenticare -- IV Putting in context -- 30 Combining messages -- 30.1 Introduction -- 30.2 Combining statements of equal importance -- 30.3 Combining statements of unequal importance -- 30.4 Setting events in a time context -- 30.5 Sequence of tenses -- 30.6 Infinitives and gerunds -- 30.7 Relationship of tenses in complex texts -- 31 Quoting or reporting events and hearsay -- 31.1 Introduction -- 31.2 Quoting: direct speech -- 31.3 Reporting: indirect speech -- 31.4 Reporting information or quoting hearsay -- 32 Expressing possibility and probability -- 32.1 Introduction -- 32.2 Certainty, uncertainty -- 32.3 Knowing, not knowing -- 32.4 Possible or impossible, probable or improbable -- 32.5 Evident, obvious -- 33 Expressing purpose -- 33.1 Introduction -- 33.2 Purpose involving only the subject of the action -- 33.3 Purpose involving someone or something else -- 33.4 Purpose attached to a person or object -- 34 Expressing causes and reasons -- 34.1 Introduction -- 34.2 Specific people, factors or events responsible -- 34.3 General cause or reason -- 34.4 Il motivo, la causa, la ragione -- 34.5 Causare, provocare, suscitare -- 34.6 Dovere, dovuto -- 34.7 Asking why -- 34.8 Using the imperfect tense to give reasons -- 35 Expressing result, effect and consequence -- 35.1 Introduction -- 35.2 Coordinating conjunctions -- 35.3 Conclusive (result) conjunctions -- 35.4 Così, tale, tanto, troppo -- 35.5 Words expressing result, effect -- 36 Specifying time -- 36.1 Introduction -- 36.2 Expressing same time context -- 36.3 Sequences of events -- 36.4 Defining the limits of a period: 'since'/'until' -- 36.5 Specifying repetition and frequency -- 36.6 Other expressions of time -- 37 Place and manner -- 37.1 Introduction -- 37.2 Place: adverbs
37.3 Place: prepositions
This new edition of the Modern Italian Grammar is an innovative reference guide to Italian, combining traditional and function-based grammar in a single volume. With a strong emphasis on contemporary usage, all grammar points and functions are richly illustrated with examples. Implementing feedback from users of the first edition, this text includes clearer explanations, as well as a greater emphasis on areas of particular difficulty for learners of Italian. Divided into two sections, the book covers: traditional grammatical categories such as word order, nouns, verbs and adjectives language functions and notions such as giving and seeking information, describing processes and results, and expressing likes, dislikes and preferences. This is the ideal reference grammar for learners of Italian at all levels, from beginner to advanced. No prior knowledge of grammatical terminology is needed and a glossary of grammatical terms is provided. This Grammar is complemented by the Modern Italian Grammar Workbook Second Edition which features related exercises and activities
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Proudfoot, Anna Modern Italian Grammar : A Practical Guide London : Taylor & Francis Group,c2012 9780415671873
Subject Italian language - Grammar
Electronic books
Alt Author Cardo, Francesco
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