Record 3 of 3
Record:   Prev Next
Author Carter, Adrian
Title Addiction Neuroethics : The Promises and Perils of Neuroscience Research on Addiction
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011
©2011
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (366 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series International Research Monographs in the Addictions
International Research Monographs in the Addictions
Note Cover -- ADDICTION NEUROETHICS -- INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH MONOGRAPHS IN THE ADDICTIONS (IRMA) -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.1.1. Neuroethics: the promises and perils of neuroscience research -- 1.2. Addiction enters the neuroscientific era -- 1.3. Aims and overview -- Part 1 The Science of Addiction -- 2 What is addiction? -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. The phenomenology of addiction -- 2.2.1. Folk understanding of addiction -- 2.2.2. Clinical understanding of addictive behaviour -- 2.3. The social and economic costs of drug use and addiction -- 2.3.1. Prevalence of drug use and addiction in Australia -- 2.3.2. Drug use related harm -- 2.3.3. Burden of disease due to alcohol and drug use -- 2.4. Social response to drug abuse and addiction -- 2.5. Governing models of addiction -- 2.5.1. Moral vs. medical models of addiction -- 2.5.2. Neurobiological models of addiction -- 2.5.3. Potential consequences of neurobiological explanations of addiction -- 2.6. Conclusion -- 3 The neurobiology of addiction -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. The neuroanatomy of addiction -- 3.2.1. Reward and reinforcement: the 'dopamine hypothesis' -- Dopamine, reward and learning -- Dopamine and withdrawal -- 3.2.2. The endogenous opioid system -- 3.3. Memory, learning and habits -- 3.4. Compulsion, craving and inhibitory control -- 3.5. Executive control and cognitive impairment -- 3.6. Representing bodily urges -- 3.7. Stress and drug use -- 3.8. Molecular and cellular changes in addiction -- 3.8.1. Synaptic plasticity in addiction -- 3.8.2. Epigenetic changes in addiction -- 3.9. Vulnerability to addiction: genetic and neuropsychological factors -- 3.9.1. Genetic susceptibility to addiction
3.9.2. Vulnerabilities to addiction: a confluence of the genetic and the social -- 3.10. Conclusion -- 4 Neurobiological treatment of addiction -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Pharmacological treatments that block drug binding -- 4.2.1. Agonists -- 4.2.2. Antagonists -- 4.2.3. Partial agonists -- 4.2.4. Duration of pharmacological treatment of addiction -- 4.3. Pharmacological treatments of withdrawal -- 4.4. Pharmacological treatments of craving and relapse -- 4.4.1. Dopaminergic mesolimbic reward pathway -- Pharmacological treatments to reduce drug reinforcement -- Pharmacological treatments to reduce cue-conditioned craving -- 4.5. Pharmacological interventions in systems related to the reward pathway -- 4.5.1. Opioids -- 4.5.2. The amino acid neurotransmitters: glutamate and GABA -- 4.5.3. Cannabinoids -- 4.5.4. Corticotropin-releasing factor and the stress response -- 4.5.5. Memory manipulators and cognitive enhancers -- 4.6. Pharmacogenetic treatment of addiction -- 4.7. Novel approaches to drug treatment -- 4.7.1. Immunotherapies -- 4.7.2. Long-acting or sustained-release medications -- 4.7.3. Neurosurgery and deep brain stimulation -- 4.7.4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation -- 4.7.5. Applications of neuroimaging and neurocognitive screening in addiction treatment -- 4.8. Psychosocial treatment of addiction -- 4.9. Conclusion -- Part 2 The Ethical and Philosophical Implications of Neuroscientific Knowledge of Addiction -- 5 Autonomy, addiction and the public good -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Approaches to ethical analysis -- 5.2.1. Introduction to ethics -- 5.2.2. Principlism -- Relationships between the principles -- 5.2.3. Human rights -- 5.2.4. A pragmatic approach to neuroethics -- 5.3. Ethical principles in the treatment of addiction -- 5.3.1. Autonomy and addiction -- 5.3.2. Addiction and the public good
5.4. The minimum conditions for the ethical treatment of addiction -- 5.5. Conclusion -- 6 Autonomy and the capacity to consent to addiction treatment -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. The role of informed consent in addiction treatment -- 6.3. Can 'addicts' say 'no' to drugs? -- 6.3.1. Sceptical views of impaired autonomy in addicted individuals -- 6.3.2. Capacity to consent to abstinence-oriented treatment -- 6.4. Implications for obtaining informed consent to enter addiction treatment -- 6.5. Guidelines when admitting individuals into addiction treatment -- 6.6. Conclusion -- 7 The rights of individuals treated for addiction -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Addiction, drug policy and human rights -- 7.2.1. Basic human rights for addicted individuals -- 7.3. The right to access to effective treatment of addiction -- 7.3.1. The case for medical treatment of addiction -- 7.3.2. Effective treatment of addiction -- 7.3.3. The right to access harm reduction measures -- 7.3.4. The right to effective medical treatment -- 7.4. The use of unevaluated and risky treatments of addiction -- 7.5. Respecting human rights when treating under legal coercion -- 7.6. Human rights in the treatment of addicted prisoners -- 7.7. Human rights in the treatment of addicted pregnant women -- 7.8. Future challenges for human rights practitioners -- 7.9. Conclusions -- 8 Coerced treatment of addiction -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Approaches to coerced treatment -- 8.3. The case for legally coerced treatment -- 8.4. When is coerced treatment ethical? -- 8.5. Ethical issues in providing coerced addiction treatment -- 8.6. Is compulsory addiction treatment ethically acceptable? -- 8.7. Conclusion -- 9 Ethics of addiction research -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Informed consent to participate in addiction research -- 9.3. Paying addicted subjects
9.4. Privacy, confidentiality and anonymity -- 9.5. Administering addictive drugs in research studies -- 9.5.1. Why do neuroscientists give drugs to 'addicts'? -- 9.5.2. The risks of giving 'addicts' drugs in research settings -- 9.5.3. Research participation by treated vs. untreated 'addicts' -- 9.5.4. Recruiting subjects and obtaining consent -- 9.6. Conclusion -- Part 3 The Ethical and Public Policy Implications of Novel Technologies for the Treatment of Addiction -- 10 New developments in the treatment of addiction -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Novel pharmacological treatments of addiction -- 10.2.1. Ethical and policy issues in pharmacological R&D in addiction -- 10.2.2. Anti-craving drugs -- 10.3. Novel relapse prevention treatments -- 10.3.1. Drug vaccines as a prophylaxis against relapse -- 10.3.2. Sustained-release treatments: depot medications and drug implants -- 10.3.3. The Australian naltrexone implant experience -- 10.3.4. Coerced use of depot naltrexone to 'restore autonomy'? -- 10.4. Conclusion -- 11 The search for a neurological 'cure' of addiction? -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. A brief history of addiction 'cures' -- 11.2.1. Quacks and nostrums: 1830-1900 -- The Keeley Cure -- Regulation of addiction treatments -- 11.2.2. Early medical treatments of drug withdrawal: 1900-1970 -- 11.3. The modern era: neurobiologically inspired addiction 'cures' -- 11.3.1. Ibogaine therapy -- 11.3.2. Ultra-rapid opioid detoxification -- 11.3.3. Neurosurgical 'treatment' of addiction -- 11.4. Deep brain stimulation for intractable addiction? -- 11.5. Avoiding future therapeutic enthusiasms -- 12 Preventive medicine and personalised treatment of addiction -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Bioprediction of addiction liability -- 12.2.1. Predictive genetic testing of addiction liability
12.2.2. Using genetic information to increase abstinence from drug use -- 12.2.3. Genetic discrimination and third party uses of genetic information -- 12.2.4. Premature commercialisation of genetic testing -- 12.2.5. Preventive interventions: 'vaccinating' against addiction -- 12.2.6. Predictive uses of neuroimaging technologies -- 12.3. Personalised treatment of addiction -- 12.3.1. Pharmacogenetic treatment of addiction -- 12.3.2. Neuroimaging and cognitive tests in the clinic -- 12.4. Conclusion -- 13 Feeling better than well -- 13.1. Introduction -- 13.2. Memory modifiers, cognitive enhancers and mood modulators -- 13.3. What's wrong with neuroenhancement? -- 13.3.1. Concerns about safety and efficacy -- 13.3.2. Coerced neuroenhancement: a psychopharmacological 'arms race' -- 13.3.3. Equity of access to neuroenhancement technologies -- 13.3.4. Naturalistic objections to enhancement: morality and personhood -- 13.4. Lessons from recreational drug use and drug policy -- 13.5. The future of drug regulation -- 13.6. Conclusion -- Part 4 The Future of Addiction Research and Policy -- 14 The social and policy implications of addiction neurobiology -- 14.1. Introduction -- 14.2. Implications for public health policies towards drug addiction -- 14.3. Medicalisation of addiction -- 14.4. Neuroscience, addiction treatment and public health policy -- 14.4.1. Competing population health strategies -- 14.4.2. Subversive uses of neuroscience research on addiction -- 14.5. Drug policy and double standards -- 14.6. The prospects of novel pharmacological harm reduction: engineering 'safer' recreational drugs? -- 14.7. Conclusions -- 15 Concluding remarks and summary -- 15.1. Introduction -- 15.2. Summary and conclusion -- 15.2.1. Key findings -- Theme 1 -- Theme 2 -- Theme 3 -- Theme 4 -- Theme 5 -- Theme 6 -- Theme 7 -- Theme 8 -- Theme 9 -- Theme 10
15.2.2. Specific implications for the treatment of addiction
Addresses the social and ethical challenges raised by the promise of neuroscience to revolutionise the treatment of addiction
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Carter, Adrian Addiction Neuroethics : The Promises and Perils of Neuroscience Research on Addiction Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2011 9781107003248
Subject Drug addiction.;Neurosciences -- Moral and ethical aspects
Electronic books
Alt Author Hall, Wayne
Record 3 of 3
Record:   Prev Next