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008    200713s2007    xx      o     ||||0 eng d 
020    9780191526015|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9780199208418 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC415100 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL415100 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10271707 
035    (CaONFJC)MIL116053 
035    (OCoLC)476240022 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 BD221.F54 2007 
082 0  401/.4 
100 1  Fiengo, Robert 
245 10 Asking Questions :|bUsing Meaningful Structures to Imply 
       Ignorance 
264  1 Oxford :|bOxford University Press, Incorporated,|c2007 
264  4 |c©2007 
300    1 online resource (194 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
505 0  Intro -- Contents -- Note on Punctuation -- 1. 
       Introduction: Ignorance and Incompleteness -- 1.1 
       Ignorance of items and ignorance of predicates -- 1.1.1 On
       the tendency to syntacticize distinctions of use -- 1.1.2 
       The incompleteness of sentence-types used to ask wh-
       questions, and the incompleteness of sentence-types used 
       to ask yes-no questions -- 1.2 Open questions, 
       confirmation questions, and the standard of completeness -
       - 1.3 Grammar and use -- 1.4 Outline of what follows -- 2.
       The Instrumental Model of Talking: How to Talk about Talk 
       -- 2.1 The use and using of expression-types -- 2.1.1 
       Common talk of using types and tokens -- 2.1.2 Personal 
       tools: the things that linguists study -- 2.2 How we talk:
       uttering tokens of types and recognizing types of tokens -
       - 2.3 Further implications of the instrumental approach --
       2.3.1 The performative proposal again -- 2.3.2 Form 
       follows failure -- 2.4 Knowing how to talk to others -- 
       2.5 The wielding of sentence-types -- 2.5.1 On the 
       wielding of sentence-types when using them to ask 
       questions -- 2.6 Conclusion -- 3. Open Questions, 
       Confirmation Questions, and how to Choose which Sentence-
       type to Use when Asking them -- 3.1 Two kinds of 
       incompleteness -- 3.1.1 Preliminaries -- 3.1.2 On what the
       questioner presents himself as lacking and as not lacking 
       -- 3.1.3 The rule of choice -- 3.1.4 On the incompleteness
       of open yes-no questions and the absence of 'the glue' -- 
       3.1.5 An alternate account of open yes-no questions -- 
       3.1.6 Other uses of incomplete sentence-types -- 3.2 
       Confirming beliefs (the epistemological setting) -- 3.2.1 
       On the uses of confirmation yes-no questions -- 3.2.2 On 
       when to ask confirmation questions, and how to respond to 
       them -- 3.3 Sarcasm and irony -- 3.3.1 Accusation -- 3.3.2
       Politeness -- 3.4 Rhetorical open questions and rhetorical
       confirmation questions -- 3.5 Closed questions 
505 8  3.5.1 Questions asked using negative sentence-types -- 
       3.5.2 The eliminative tactic -- 3.5.3 Tag questions -- 
       3.5.4 Confidence and its lack: two examples of wielding 
       tag questions -- 3.6 The speciation of challenges -- 3.6.1
       Tag challenges -- 3.6.2 Non-acceptance and disbelief -- 
       astonishment and surprise -- 3.7 Kinds of wh-questions -- 
       3.7.1 Repeat questions -- 3.7.2 How the challenge 
       distinctions fare in using wh-questions -- 3.7.3 Quiz 
       questions -- 3.7.4 Wh-the-hell questions -- 3.8 Closing 
       remarks -- 4. Quantifiers, Wh-expressions, and Manners of 
       Interpretation -- 4.1 The manners of interpretation of 
       'each' and 'every' -- 4.1.1 Individualizing and Totalizing
       : the different manners of 'each' and 'every' -- 4.1.2 
       'Each' and 'every' contrasted in transparent contexts -- 
       4.1.3 'Each' and 'every' contrasted in opaque contexts -- 
       4.2 The manners and structures of 'which N' and 'what N' -
       - 4.2.1 The grammatical number of the restriction -- 4.2.2
       The Individualizing manner of 'which N', and the 
       Totalizing manner of 'what N' -- 4.2.3 Argument and 
       predicate occurrences -- covert and absent restrictions --
       4.2.4 The inadequacy of D-linking in distinguishing 
       'which' from other wh-expressions -- 4.3 Incompleteness --
       4.3.1 Are wh-expressions incomplete, or do they lack 
       something? -- 4.3.2 The incompleteness of indefiniteness -
       - 4.4 The manners and structures of 'who' and 'what' -- 
       4.4.1 The syntax of 'who' and 'what' -- 4.4.2 The weak 
       manner of interpretation of 'who' and 'what' -- 4.5 
       Multiple questions -- 4.5.1 Multiple which-questions -- 
       4.5.2 Which which-question to ask? -- 4.5.3 Multiple who-
       questions and multiple what-questions -- 4.6 On the 
       speciation of the questioning speech-acts as reflected in 
       the choice of wh-expressions -- 5. Syntactic Structure -- 
       5.1 Syntactic notation and the representation of phrase-
       markers 
505 8  5.2 Ordering in syntactic representation -- 5.2.1 
       'Horizontal' ordering, 'vertical' ordering, and the 
       containing node -- 5.2.2 The definitions of containment 
       and dominance -- 5.3 Movement (splitting), and the lack 
       thereof -- 5.3.1 The powers of positions, the powers of 
       expressions, and incompleteness -- 5.4 Ideal 
       representation for variables, quantifiers, and wh-
       expressions -- 5.4.1 The logical representation of wh-
       expressions and the overt marking of relative scope -- 5.5
       The explanation for restrictions on crossing -- 5.6 Scopal
       differences and structural differences -- 5.6.1 Dominance 
       and prominence -- 5.7 The indication of saturation -- 
       5.7.1 The completeness of indirect questions and the 
       absence of inversion -- 5.7.2 The absence of inversion and
       wh-splitting in confirmation questions -- 5.8 Summary -- 
       6. On the Questioning Speech-acts and the Kinds of 
       Ignorance they Address -- 6.1 What the questioner is 
       asking for -- 6.2 Asking for things-in-the-world and 
       asking for bits of language -- 6.3 Asking for properties 
       and asking for predicates -- the distinction between 
       Calling questions and Describing questions -- 6.4 Calling,
       Exemplifying, and Classing questions -- 6.4.1 The 
       distinction between Calling questions and Exemplifying 
       questions -- 6.4.2 Classing questions -- 6.5 Multiple 
       questions -- 6.5.1 How ignorant can a questioner be? -- 
       6.5.2 On the speech-acts that may be performed when asking
       multiple questions -- 6.5.3 Is there a quartet of multiple
       questions? -- 6.5.4 Are there mixings of the questioning 
       speech-acts? -- 6.6 Identity questions, manner, and 
       Austin's quartet -- 6.6.1 Which is which? -- 6.6.2 Who is 
       who? -- 6.7 What is a question? -- Bibliography -- Index -
       - A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L
       -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- 
       Y 
520    Asking Questions examines a central phenomenon of language
       - the use of sentences to ask questions. Although there is
       a sizable literature on the syntax and semantics of 
       interrogatives, the logic of "questions", and the speech 
       act of questioning, no one has tried to put the syntax and
       semantics together with the speech acts over the full 
       range of phenomena we pretheoretically think of as asking 
       questions. Robert Fiengo not only does this, but also 
       takes upsome more foundational issues in the theory of 
       language.Asking Questions advances our understanding of a 
       wide range of issues in a number of important respects. 
       Scholars and students of linguistics and philosophy will 
       find plenty to interest them in this pioneering work 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Ignorance (Theory of knowledge);Knowledge, Theory of -- 
       Methodology.;Questioning.;Rhetoric 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aFiengo, Robert|tAsking Questions : Using
       Meaningful Structures to Imply Ignorance|dOxford : Oxford 
       University Press, Incorporated,c2007|z9780199208418 
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