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Author Hamers, Josiane F
Title Bilinguality and Bilingualism
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2000
©2000
book jacket
Edition 2nd ed
Descript 1 online resource (484 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Foreword to the second edition -- Preface -- Introduction -- 1 Definitions and guiding principles -- 1.1 DEFINITIONS -- 1.2 GENERAL GUIDELINES TO LANGUAGE BEHAVIOUR -- 1.2.1 A functional approach to language behaviour -- 1.2.2 A general model of language behaviour -- 1.2.3 Developmental aspects of language behaviour -- 1.2.4 Collective aspects of language behaviour -- 1.2.4.1 Monolingual situation -- 1.2.4.2 Bilingual situation -- 1.3 CONCLUSION -- 2 Dimensions and measurement of bilinguality and bilingualism -- 2.1 DIMENSIONS OF BILINGUALITY AND BILINGUALISM -- 2.1.1 Dimensions of bilinguality -- 2.1.2 Dimensions of societal bilingualism -- 2.2 MEASUREMENT OF BILINGUALITY AND BILINGUALISM -- 2.2.1 The measurement of bilinguality -- 2.2.1.1 Comparative measures -- 2.2.1.2 Measures of bilingual competence -- 2.2.1.3 Measures of compound-coordinate bilinguality -- 2.2.1.4 Language biographies, self-evaluation and judgements of bilingual production -- 2.2.1.5 Measures of bilingual specificity -- 2.2.1.6 Measures of cognitive correlates of bilinguality -- 2.2.1.7 Measures of affective correlates of bilinguality -- 2.2.2 Measurement of bilinguality in cultural minorities -- 2.2.3 Measurement of societal bilingualism -- 2.2.3.1 Censuses -- 2.2.3.2 Surveys -- 2.2.3.3 Sociolinguistic and ethnographic methods -- 2.3 CONCLUSION -- 3 Ontogenesis of bilinguality -- 3.1 BILINGUISTIC DEVELOPMENT -- 3.1.1 Preverbal development -- 3.1.1.1 Early reception -- 3.1.1.2 Early productions -- 3.1.2 Stages of bilinguistic development -- 3.1.2.1 Lexical development -- 3.1.2.2 Grammatical development -- 3.1.3 Bilingual-specific behaviour: linguistic mixing, code-switching and translation -- 3.1.4 Difierentiation in linguistic systems
3.1.5 The role of context and interaction in bilinguistic development -- 3.2 ONTOGENESIS OF EARLY CONSECUTIVE BILINGUALITY -- 3.2.1 Age-related specificities of consecutive bilinguality -- 3.2.2 Age-related processing in consecutive bilinguality -- 3.2.3 The role of context in childhood L acquisition -- 3.3 GESTURAL/ARTICULATED BILINGUALITY -- 3.4 SENSITIVE-AGE HYPOTHESIS -- 3.5 LANGUAGE ATTRITION AND BILINGUALITY -- 3.5.1 Environmental L attrition in bilinguals -- 3.5.2 Age-related and pathological attrition -- 3.6 CONCLUSION -- 4 Cognitive development and the sociocultural context of bilinguality -- 4.1 BILINGUALITY AND COGNITION -- 4.1.1 Language socialisation -- 4.1.2 Bilinguality and cognitive development -- 4.2 COGNITIVE CONSEQUENCES OF BILINGUALITY -- 4.2.1 Early studies on the cognitive consequences of bilingual development -- 4.2.2 The relationship between bilinguality and intelligence: the milestone of the Peal & Lambert study -- 4.2.3 The nature of the bilingual's cognitive advantages -- 4.2.4 Negative consequences of bilingual experience -- 4.2.5 Explaining positive and negative effects -- 4.2.5.1 Developmental interdependence and threshold hypotheses -- 4.2.5.2 The additivity-subtractivity theory: focus on the sociocultural context -- 4.3 SOCIAL NETWORKS, LANGUAGE VALORISATION AND LITERACY: THE SOCIOCULTURAL INTERDEPENDENCE HYPOTHESIS -- 4.3.1 Bilinguality and social networks -- 4.3.2 Bilinguality and literacy -- 4.3.3 The sociocultural and cognitive interdependence hypothesis -- 4.4 CONCLUSION -- 5 Social and psychological foundations of bilinguality -- 5.1 PROCES E OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT -- 5.1.1 Language socialisation and internalisation -- 5.1.2 Form-function mapping (fFm) -- 5.1.2.1 Mapping form onto social function -- 5.1.2.2 Mapping form onto cognitive function -- 5.1.3 Development of social psychological processes
5.1.4 Development of cognitive processes -- 5.1.4.1 Representations -- 5.1.4.2 Cognitive dimensions -- 5.1.4.3 Language as a cognitive tool -- 5.1.4.4 Language as an object of cognitive processing -- 5.1.4.5 The development of literacy -- 5.1.5 Valorisation and motivational processes -- 5.1.6 Self-regulated behaviour -- 5.1.7 A sociocognitive interactional model of language development -- 5.2 THE DEVELOPMENT OF BILINGUALITY -- 5.2.1 A sociocognitive interactional model of bilinguality -- 5.2.2 Case studies: types of bilinguality -- A Cases of simultaneous bilinguality -- B Cases of early consecutive bilinguality -- C Cases of language shift -- 5.3 CONCLUSION -- 6 Neuropsychological foundations of bilinguality -- 6.1 HEMISPHERIC PREFERENCE AND LANGUAGE BEHAVIOUR -- 6.2 TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING CEREBRAL PREFERENCE FOR LANGUAGE -- 6.3 NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF BILINGUALS -- 6.3.1 Evidence from polyglot aphasic patients -- 6.3.1.1 Selective impairment and recovery in polyglot aphasia -- 6.3.1.2 Bilingual-specific behaviours in polyglot aphasics -- 6.3.1.3 Polyglot aphasia and bilingualism -- 6.3.2 Evidence from brain-intact bilinguals -- 6.3.2.1 Comparing bilinguals and monolinguals -- 6.3.2.2 Language-specific cerebral organisation of bilinguals -- 6.3.2.3 Age of acquisition of bilinguality and the onset of laterality -- 6.3.2.4 Age of acquisition and cerebral strategies -- 6.3.2.5 Bilingual competence and hemispheric preference -- 6.3.2.6 Hemispheric preference and language-acquisition context -- 6.3.2.7 Language differences and hemispheric involvement -- 6.3.2.8 Script differences and hemispheric preferences -- 6.4 HEMISPHERIC PREFERENCE AND THE SIGNING BILINGUAL -- 6.5 CONCLUSION -- 7 Information processing in the bilingual -- 7.1 LANGUAGE STORING AND PROCESSING IN BILINGUALS -- 7.1.1 Language representation in bilinguals
7.1.1.1 Coordinate vs. compound bilinguals -- 7.1.1.2 The bilingual's memory -- 7.1.1.3 Early models of separate and common stores -- 7.1.2 Separate or common processors for the two languages -- 7.1.2.1 Switching mechanisms in bilinguals -- 7.1.2.2 Syntactic processing in bilinguals -- 7.2 MODELS OF BILINGUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING -- 7.2.1 The monitor model -- 7.2.2 Green's model of speech control -- 7.2.3 The dual-coding model -- 7.2.4 Hierarchical models -- 7.2.4.1 T he conceptual-lexical hierarchical models -- 7.2.4.2 Asymmetrical storage models -- 7.3 NON-VERBAL BEHAVIOUR OF THE BILINGUAL -- 7.3.1 Paralinguistic and gestural behaviour -- 7.3.2 Bilingual behaviour and stress -- 7.3.3 The bilingual's personality -- 7.3.2 Bilingual behaviour and stress -- 7.3.3 The bilingual's personality -- 7.4 CONCLUSION -- 8 Social psychological aspects of bilinguality: culture and identity -- 8.1 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE -- 8.2 CULTURAL/ETHNIC/ETHNOLINGUISTIC IDENTITY -- 8.2.1 The salience of cultural characteristics -- 8.2.2 Enculturation, acculturation and deculturation -- 8.2.3 The development of cultural and ethnolinguistic identity -- 8.3 BILINGUALITY AND ETHNOLINGUISTIC IDENTITY -- 8.3.1 The development of ethnic perceptions -- 8.3.2 Self-esteem and plural ethnic identity -- 8.3.3 Context and the salience of ethnic identity -- 8.3.4 Bilinguality as a cultural trait -- 8.3.5 Bilingual proficiency, identity and acculturation -- 8.3.6 The bilingual's cultural identity -- 8.4 BILINGUALITY, PERCEPTION AND ATTITUDES -- 8.4.1 Language, perceptions and attitudes -- 8.4.2 The evaluation of non-native speech and ethnic clues -- 8.5 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF L ACQUISITION -- 8.5.1 Cognitive variables in L learning -- 8.5.2 Affective variables in L learning -- 8.5.2.1 Gardner's socio-educative model -- 8.5.2.2 T he socio-contextual model
8.5.3 Cognitive style and personality variables -- 8.6 CONCLUSION -- 9 Social psychological aspects of bilinguality: intercultural communication -- 9.1 SPEECH/COMMUNICATION ACCOMMODATION -- 9.1.1 Foundations of speech-accommodation theory -- 9.1.2 Empirical support for speech-accommodation theory -- 9.1.3 Psychological reality of speech accommodation -- 9.1.4 Towards a model of speech accommodation -- 9.2 COMMUNICATION TRATEGIE IN INTERCULTURAL INTERACTION -- 9.2.1 Code choice /selection -- 9.2.2 Speech modification strategies -- 9.2.2.1 Foreigner talk -- 9.2.2.2 Broken language -- 9.2.2.3 Communication strategies in L learning/use -- 9.3 'CODE-SWITCHING', 'CODE-MIXING', 'BILINGUAL BORROWING' -- 9.3.1 The grammar of code-switching -- 9.3.1.1 Insertional vs. alternational code-switching -- 9.3.1.2 L inguistic factors constraining code-switching -- 9.3.1.3 Conclusions -- 9.3.2 The social meaning of code-switching -- 9.3.3 Code-mixing -- 9.4 CONCLUSION -- 10 Societal bilingualism, intergroup relations and sociolinguistic variations -- 10.1 ORIGIN OF SOCIETAL BILINGUALISM -- 10.2 THE ROLE OF LANGUAGE IN INTERGROUP RELATIONS -- 10.2.1 Language and group boundaries -- 10.2.2 Language as symbol and instrument of group identity -- 10.2.3 Ethnolinguistic vitality -- 10.2.4 Language and ethnicity in multicultural settings -- 10.3 SOCIOLINGUISTIC VARIATIONS IN LANGUAGE-CONTACT SITUATIONS -- 10.3.1 Speech repertoires in multilingual communities -- 10.3.2 Bilingualism and diglossia -- 10.3.3 Language shift -- 10.3.4 Language attrition -- 10.3.5 Pidginisation, creolisation and decreolisation -- 10.3.5.1 Pidginisation -- 10.3.5.2 Creolisation -- 10.3.5.3 Decreolisation -- 10.4 IMPLICATIONS OF LANGUAGE-CONTACT PHENOMENA FOR LINGUISTIC THEORY -- 10.5 LANGUAGE PLANNING -- 10.6 CONCLUSION -- 11 Bilingual education -- 11.1 LITERACY AND LANGUAGE PLANNING IN EDUCATION
11.2 DEFINITIONS AND TYPOLOGIES OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION
Presents state-of-the-art knowledge about languages in contact from individual bilingualism (or bilinguality) to societal bilingualism
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Hamers, Josiane F. Bilinguality and Bilingualism Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2000 9780521640497
Subject Bilingualism
Electronic books
Alt Author Blanc, Michel H. A
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