LEADER 00000nam  2200289   4500 
001    AAINR16031 
005    20080605131436.5 
008    080605s2006                        eng d 
020    9780494160312 
035    (UMI)AAINR16031 
040    UMI|cUMI 
100 1  Johnston, Rebekah 
245 10 Dunamis in Book IX of Aristotle's "Metaphysics": The 
       sphere of motion and the sphere of being 
300    235 p 
500    Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 67-
       07, Section: A, page: 2607 
502    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Toronto (Canada), 2006 
520    This thesis provides a detailed analysis of chapters one 
       to eight of the ninth book of Aristotle's Metaphysics; a 
       book which has received little scholarly attention even 
       though it includes Aristotle's only extended treatment of 
       potentiality and actuality. The first task of this thesis 
       is to provide an account of Aristotle's theory of powers; 
       that is, of his treatment in this book of   duna&d12; m3iv
       as principles of motion and change. I argue that the scope
       of this sense of   du&d12;na miv  is much broader than is 
       generally acknowledged such that it covers not only both 
       rational and nonrational   duna&d12; m3iv , but also   
       duna&d12; m3iv  for incomplete motions like building and 
       complete motions like seeing. Moreover, I argue that the 
       best way to understand the existence of   duna&d12; m3iv  
       is not through dispositional analyses but by taking   duna
       &d12; m3iv  to be one in number with but different in 
       essence from categorical features of being such as hot and
       cold and the arts. These claims, while important in their 
       own right for our understanding of Aristotle's theory of 
       powers are also important insofar as they contribute to 
       our understanding of the ultimate point of the book which 
       is an examination of being according to actuality and 
       potentiality 
520    The second task of the thesis is to show that book nine of
       the  Metaphysics contains a sustained argument rather than
       several disconnected discussions as many suppose. I argue 
       the second task of the thesis is to show that book nine of
       the Metaphysics contains a sustained argument rather than 
       several disconnected discussions as many suppose. I argue 
       that the main point of the book is to distinguish 
       perishable from imperishable substances by drawing a 
       division between things that exist potentially and things 
       that exist actually. Making sense of Aristotle's claim 
       that perishable things exist potentially, in particular, 
       finding a way to construe this claim that does not 
       conflict with his insistence that being is not a univocal 
       predicate, requires that we begin with his treatment of   
       du&d12;na miv  as a principle of motion and draw on the 
       set of distinctions Aristotle develops throughout the 
       course of the book as he transforms the notion of   du&
       d12;na miv  from its use within the sphere of motion and 
       change to its use within the sphere of being 
590    School code: 0779 
590    DDC 
650  4 Philosophy 
690    0422 
710 20 University of Toronto (Canada) 
773 0  |tDissertation Abstracts International|g67-07A 
856 40 |uhttp://pqdd.sinica.edu.tw/twdaoapp/servlet/
       advanced?query=NR16031