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Author Kaufman, Jason A
Title Personal perceptions of stress and self-perceived need for social support among doctoral psychology students in a distance education university sample
book jacket
Descript 78 p
Note Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 65-02, Section: B, page: 1031
Adviser: Angelo Pimpinelli
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Capella University, 2004
This study explored the relationships between personal perceptions of stress and self-perceived need for social support among doctoral psychology students in a distance education university sample. Previous studies have demonstrated that many students perceive graduate school as a stressful experience (e.g., Cahill & Morris, 1991; Rocha-Singh, 1994), and that insufficient social support comprises an important role in perceptions of stress among graduate students (Rocha-Singh, 1994). The current study therefore used a measure of personally perceived stress (the Perceived Stress Scale; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) and a measure of self-perceived needs (the Adjective Check List; Gough & Heilbrun, 1983) to consider a sample of doctoral students from the Capella University Harold Abel School of Psychology. Responses from the 41 participants (7 males, 34 females) indicated no statistical significance difference in personal perceptions of stress across genders. Contrary to expectations, bivariate correlational analyses were unable to demonstrate meaningful relationships among personal perceptions of stress and self-perceived need for social support. However, independent samples t tests comparing high and low personal perceptions of stress across self-perceived needs for social support suggested that participants perceiving greater stress tended to manifest more aggressive and less deferential needs relative to social support. Additionally, bivariate correlational analysis revealed as expected a direct relationship between personal perceptions of stress and counseling readiness, allowing for discussion of potential institutional application. Guided visual imagery and hypnosis were specifically explored as potential methods of intervention that might be offered in preventive fashion by university counseling centers
School code: 1351
DDC
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 65-02B
Subject Psychology, Clinical
Education, Higher
Psychology, Physiological
0622
0745
0989
Alt Author Capella University
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