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Author Praag, H. M. van
Title Stress, the Brain and Depression
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2004
©2004
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (297 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- 1 Diagnosing depression -- 1.1 Diagnosing and classifying -- 1.2 Diagnosing depression -- 1.2.1 The nosological approach -- 1.2.2 Problems inherent to nosological systems -- 1.2.3 The syndromal approach -- 1.2.4 Problems inherent to the syndromal approach -- 1.2.5 The dimensional/functional approach -- 1.3 Multi-tier diagnosing -- 1.4 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 2 Traumatic life events: general issues -- 2.1 History -- 2.2 Definitions -- 2.2.1 The stress syndrome -- 2.2.2 Coping with the stress syndrome -- 2.3 Life events and psychiatric classification -- 2.4 Life events and abnormal mental states -- 2.5 Life events and personality structure -- 2.6 Genetic and environmental variables influencing exposure to life events -- 2.6.1 Life events do not occur capriciously -- 2.6.2 Genes and environment -- 2.7 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 3 Life events and depression: preliminary issues -- 3.1 The agenda -- 3.2 Border issues -- 3.2.1 Distress versus depression -- 3.2.2 Chronic depression versus personality-related depressive traits -- 3.3 Meaning of the term life event -- 3.3.1 Definition -- 3.3.2 Heterogeneity -- External events -- Internal events -- Dependent and independent life events -- Controllability -- Type of event -- Conclusion -- 3.4 How to assess life events -- 3.4.1 Checklists -- 3.4.2 Structured interviews -- 3.4.3 De-subjectivation -- 3.4.4 Conclusion -- 3.5 What is meant by the term causation? -- 3.6 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 4 Life events and depression: is there a causal connection? -- 4.1 What kind of evidence is needed? -- 4.2 Life events preceding depression -- 4.2.1 Acute events -- 4.2.2 Chronic difficulties -- 4.3 Vulnerability -- 4.4 Life events, personality and depression -- 4.4.1 A triad? -- 4.4.2 Depression and personality
4.4.3 Life events and personality -- 4.4.4 Congruence -- 4.4.5 Conclusions -- 4.5 Early adversity, life events, personality and depression -- 4.6 Genes, life events, personality and depression -- 4.7 Life events and recovery from depression -- 4.8 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 5 Genetics of depression -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Genetics of depression -- 5.2.1 Genetic epidemiology of depression -- 5.2.2 Molecular genetics of depression -- 5.3 Genes and environment -- 5.4 The depression exophenotype -- 5.4.1 Depression as a discrete and a continuous trait -- 5.4.2 Genetics of the qualitative phenotype -- Family studies -- Twin studies -- 5.4.3 Genetics of the quantitative phenotype -- 5.4.4 Genetics of the comorbid phenotype -- 5.5 The depression endophenotype -- 5.6 The genetics of personality and depression -- 5.7 Development and genes -- 5.8 Molecular genetic findings -- 5.9 Do environmental factors create enduring liabilities to depression? -- 5.10 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- 6 Gene-environment correlation and interaction in depression -- 6.1 Gene-environment relationships -- 6.1.1 Correlation: genes influence environmental exposure -- 6.1.2 Synergism: genes and environment co-participate in the same cause -- Models describing gene-environment synergism -- 6.1.3 Genes and environment add to each other's effect -- 6.1.4 Genes and environment multiply each other's effects -- 6.2 Research findings on gene-environment interaction and correlation -- 6.2.1 Gene-environment correlation -- 6.2.2 Gene-environment interaction -- 6.3 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- 7 Monoamines and depression -- 7.1 The beginnings -- 7.2 Serotonin and depression -- 7.2.1 Localization of serotonergic circuits -- 7.2.2 Serotonin metabolism -- 7.2.3 In vivo receptor studies -- 5-HT receptors and depression -- 5-HT1A receptors -- 5-HT1B (D) receptors -- 5-HT2 receptors
5-HT receptors and therapeutic activity of present-day antidepressants -- 5-HT transporter -- 7.2.4 Postmortem receptor studies -- 7.2.5 Genetic studies -- 7.2.6 Conclusions -- 7.3 Noradrenaline and depression -- 7.3.1 Localization -- 7.3.2 Noradrenaline metabolism -- 7.3.3 Noradrenaline receptor studies -- 7.3.4 Conclusions -- 7.4 Dopamine and depression -- 7.4.1 Localization -- 7.4.2 Dopamine metabolism -- 7.4.3 DA receptor studies -- 7.4.4 DA and antidepressant action -- 7.4.5 Conclusions -- 7.5 Behavioural correlates of the monoaminergic disturbances in depression -- 7.6 Some animal data on 5-HT ergic regulation of anxiety and aggression -- 7.7 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 8 Stress hormones and depression -- 8.1 Stress and stress response -- 8.2 Stress and the HPA system -- 8.2.1 The stress response -- 8.2.2 The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response -- 8.2.3 Cortisol: permissive, feedback and preparatory actions -- 8.2.4 Brain corticosteroid receptors -- 8.2.5 Heterogeneity of the stress response -- 8.2.6 The pacemaker -- 8.3 Depression and the HPA system -- 8.4 CRH and HPA axis abnormalities: stress-related or depression-related? -- 8.4.1 How should the question be phrased? -- 8.4.2 Antidepressants and the HPA axis -- 8.4.3 CRH, a depressogenic substance? -- CRH localization and CRH receptors -- Effects of CRH in animals -- CRH and depression -- CRH, corticosteroids, depression and brain morphology -- 8.4.4 CRH, corticosteroids and early life stress in animals -- Early life stress and stressor responsivity -- Mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term effects of maternal separation -- Persistent effects of mother-pup interaction -- 8.4.5 The behavioural effects of early life stress in humans -- Behavioural effects of childhood adversity -- Childhood adversity and dysfunction of the HPA axis -- Posttraumatic stress disorder
Childhood adversity and structural changes in the brain -- 8.4.6 Cortisol and the functioning of monoaminergic systems -- HPA axis and serotonin -- HPA axis and noradrenaline -- HPA axis and dopamine -- Conclusions -- 8.4.7 Glucocorticoids and antidepressant action -- 8.5 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 9 Stress, the brain and depression -- 9.1 The stress syndrome and depression: psychopathological and biological overlap -- 9.2 Depression, anxiety and aggression: the concept of comorbidity -- 9.3 Comorbidity of depression, anxiety and aggression: some numbers -- 9.3.1 Intercorrelation of the symptoms of mood lowering, anxiety and aggressivity -- 9.3.2 Comorbidity of mood disorders and anxiety disorders -- 9.3.3 Comorbidity of depression and personality disorder -- 9.4 Comorbidity of anxiety and depression: ways the problem has been approached -- 9.4.1 Hierarchical exclusion rules -- 9.4.2 Combination diagnoses -- Atypical depression -- Mixed anxiety-depression disorder -- 9.5 Relationship between anxiety and mood disorders -- 9.6 Anxiety and aggression as pacemakers of depression -- 9.6.1 Anxiety, aggression and mood -- 9.6.2 Anxiety/aggression and depression: psychopathological aspects -- 9.6.3 Anxiety/aggression and depression: biological aspects -- Serotonin -- Stress (CRH/cortisol) - serotonin interactions -- Psychopharmacological observations -- 9.6.4 Anxiety/aggression-driven depression: aspects of personality structure -- 9.6.5 Anxiety/aggression-driven depression: a psycho-bio-psychopathological bridge hypothesis -- 9.6.6 Anxiety/aggression-driven depression: therapeutic expectations -- 9.7 Anxiety/aggression-driven depression: diagnostic implications -- 9.7.1 Diagnostic acuity: a condition sine qua non for biological stress research -- 9.7.2 Functionalization of psychiatric diagnosing
9.7.3 Importance of functionalization for the diagnostic process in psychiatry -- 9.7.4 Functionalization of diagnosis and the construct of anxiety/aggression-driven depression -- 9.7.5 Verticalization of psychiatric diagnosing -- 9.7.6 Approaches towards verticalization of psychiatric diagnoses -- 9.7.7 Importance of verticalization for the diagnostic process in psychiatry -- 9.8 Consequences of diagnostic renewal for biological psychiatric and psychopharmacological research -- 9.9 Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- Epilogue -- Stress-induced depression -- Vulnerabilities -- Recognizability -- Diagnostic strategies -- Name index -- Subject index
Can traumatic life events cause depression and, if so, how? This book examines the biology, classification and treatment issues
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Praag, H. M. van Stress, the Brain and Depression Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2004 9780521621472
Subject Depression, Mental--Pathogenesis
Electronic books
Alt Author Kloet, E. R. de
Os, J. van
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