Record:   Prev Next
Author Jaouen, Gérard
Title Bioorganometallic Chemistry : Applications in Drug Discovery, Biocatalysis, and Imaging
Imprint Weinheim : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015
©2015
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (421 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Bioorganometallic Chemistry: Applications in Drug Discovery, Biocatalysis, and Imaging -- Contents -- List of Contributors -- Preface -- Part One: Medicinal Chemistry -- 1. Organometallic Complexes as Enzyme Inhibitors: A Conceptual Overview -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Organometallic Compounds as Inert Structural Scaffolds for Enzyme Inhibition -- 1.3 Organometallic Compounds Targeting Specific Protein Residues -- 1.4 The Bioisosteric Substitution -- 1.5 Novel Mechanisms of Enzyme Inhibition with Organometallic Compounds -- 1.6 Organometallic Compounds as Cargo Delivers of Enzyme Inhibitors -- 1.7 Organometallic Enzyme Inhibitors for Theranostic Purposes -- 1.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- References -- 2. The Biological Target Potential of Organometallic Steroids -- 2.1 Introductory Note on Nuclear Receptors -- 2.1.1 Early History -- 2.1.2 Primary Structure of Nuclear Receptors -- 2.1.3 Estrogen Receptors -- 2.1.4 Androgens -- 2.1.5 Glucocorticoids -- 2.1.6 Progesterone and Progestogens -- 2.1.7 Mineralocorticoids and Aldosterone -- 2.1.8 Selective Modulators of Nuclear Receptors -- 2.1.8.1 Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) -- 2.1.8.2 Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) -- 2.1.8.3 Selective Progesterone Receptor Modulators (SPRMs) -- 2.1.9 Mechanism of Action of Nuclear Receptors -- 2.1.10 Endocrine Disruptors -- 2.2 Steroids and Organometallics: An Overview of the Transitional Period from the Use of Organometallics in Synthesis to the Emergence of Bioorganometallics -- 2.2.1 Early Examples of Organometallic Estradiol Derivatives with Biological Potential: Modified Hormone Shown to Bind to Estrogen Receptor α -- 2.2.2 Examples of Estrogens Modified by Organometallics at the 11β-Position -- 2.2.3 Targeting Prostate Cancer with Organometallic Androgens and Antiandrogens
2.2.4 Approach Toward Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals -- 2.2.4.1 Steroidal Derivatives -- 2.2.4.2 Nonsteroidal Complexes -- 2.3 Epilog -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 3. Chirality in Organometallic Anticancer Complexes -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Chirality in Arene Complexes -- 3.3 CIP System for the Nomenclature of Chiral-at-Metal Arene Complexes -- 3.4 Chiral Organometallic Complexes as Anticancer Agents -- 3.4.1 Chiral Carbene Complexes -- 3.4.2 Chiral Metallocene Complexes -- 3.4.3 Chiral Half-Sandwich Arene Complexes -- 3.4.4 Chirality at Metal in Supramolecular Complexes -- 3.5 Half-Sandwich Complexes with Chiral Metal Centers -- 3.5.1 Factors Influencing the Chirality at the Metal Center -- 3.5.1.1 Use of Chiral Ligands for Chiral Resolution at the Metal Center: Diastereoisomerism -- 3.5.1.2 CH-π Interactions: β-Phenyl Effect and Hydrogen Bond Interactions -- 3.5.1.3 Effect of the Temperature, Solvent and Ligands on the Metal Configuration -- 3.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 4. Gold Organometallics with Biological Properties -- 4.1 Introduction: The Use of Gold in Medicine -- 4.2 Anticancer Gold Organometallics and Proposed Biological Targets -- 4.2.1 Cyclometalated Gold(III) Complexes with C,N-Donor Ligands -- 4.2.1.1 Types of Cycloaurated Complexes, Synthetic Methods, and Reactivity -- 4.2.1.2 Cycloaurated Complexes with Biological Activities -- 4.2.2 Gold N-Heterocyclic Carbene (NHC) Complexes -- 4.2.3 Gold Alkynyl Complexes -- 4.3 Conclusions and Perspectives -- List of Abbreviations -- References -- 5. On the Molecular Mechanisms of the Antimalarial Action of Ferroquine -- 5.1 History and Development -- 5.2 Mechanism(s) of Action of 4-Aminoquinoline Antimalarials -- 5.3 Mechanism(s) of Action of Ferroquine as an Antimalarial -- 5.3.1 Antimalarial Activity -- 5.3.2 Metabolic Pathway of Ferroquine
5.3.3 Redox Properties of FQ -- 5.3.4 Basic Properties and Accumulation -- 5.3.5 Importance of Redox Properties of Ferrocene on Antimalarial Activity of FQ -- 5.3.6 Inhibition of Hemozoin Formation -- 5.4 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- List of Abbreviations -- References -- 6. Metal Carbonyl Prodrugs: CO Delivery and Beyond -- 6.1 Introducing CO in Biology -- 6.1.1 Origin -- 6.1.2 Biological Action and Targets of CO -- 6.1.3 Therapeutic Outlook -- 6.1.4 Measuring CO in Biology -- 6.2 Therapeutic Delivery of CO -- 6.2.1 CO Gas and Inhalation -- 6.2.2 Prodrugs for CO Delivery: CO-Releasing Molecules (CORM) -- 6.2.2.1 Definitions and Concept -- 6.2.3 Early CORMs -- 6.2.3.1 Nonmetal-Based CORMs -- 6.2.3.2 Metal Carbonyl-Based CORMs -- 6.2.4 The Chemical Biology of Early CORMs -- 6.2.4.1 [Ru(CO)3]2+-Based CORMs -- 6.2.4.2 [Mo(CO)n]-Based CORMs -- 6.2.4.3 Miscellaneous Biologically Significant Observations on Early-Stage CORMs -- 6.3 Biological and Therapeutic Results Obtained with the Early-Stage CORMs -- 6.3.1 CORM and Inflammatory Response -- 6.3.2 Cardioprotective Effects of CORM -- 6.3.3 Central Nervous System and CORMs -- 6.3.4 Transplantation -- 6.3.5 Bactericide Effects of CORMs -- 6.3.6 CORMs: Tissue Regeneration and Modulation of Cell Proliferation/Differentiation -- 6.3.7 CORMs and Cancer Therapy? -- 6.4 Beyond the Early-Stage CORMs: Strategies for Finding New Candidates -- 6.4.1 Evaluation of CO Release from CORMs -- 6.4.2 Light Activated or photoCORMs -- 6.4.3 Chemically Activated CORMs -- 6.4.4 Bioactivated or Enzyme-Triggered CORMs (ET-CORMs) -- 6.5 Intracellular Detection of CORMs, Mechanistic Studies, and Other Unanswered Questions -- 6.6 Designing Pharmacologically Useful, Drug-like CORMs -- 6.6.1 The First Drug-like CORM -- 6.7 Final Remarks and Perspectives -- List of Abbreviations -- References
7. Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Natural Thiol-Containing Ligands: Physicochemistry, Biology, and Medicine -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The History of Detection and Identification of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands in Microorganisms and Animal Tissues -- 7.3 Physicochemistry of DNIC with Natural Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.3.1 Mono- and Binuclear forms of DNIC with Natural Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.3.2 Two Approaches to the Synthesis of DNIC with Natural Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.3.3 Mechanisms of Formation of DNIC with Natural Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.3.4 The Electronic and Spatial Structures of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.3.5 DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands as NO and NO Donors -- 7.4 Biological Effects of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.4.1 S-Nitrosating Effect of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.4.2 Vasodilator and Hypotensive Effects of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.4.3 Inhibiting Effect of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands on Platelet Aggregation -- 7.4.4 DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands Increase Erythrocyte Elasticity -- 7.4.5 DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands Accelerate Skin Wound Healing in Animals -- 7.4.6 Erective Activity of DNIC -- 7.4.7 DNIC and Apoptosis -- 7.4.8 DNIC with Glutathione Inhibits the Development of Experimental Endometriosis in Rats -- 7.4.9 Other Examples of Biological Effects of DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands -- 7.5 DNIC with Thiol-Containing Ligands as a Basis in the Design of Drugs with a Broad Range of Therapeutic Activities -- List of Abbreviations -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part Two: Metalloproteins, Catalysis, and Energy Production -- 8. The Bioorganometallic Chemistry of Hydrogenase -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 Hydrogenase -- 8.1.2 The Chemistry of Hydrogen -- 8.1.3 Dihydrogen Metal Complexes -- 8.1.4 First Coordination Sphere Ligands
8.2 Structure and Function -- 8.2.1 The Active Sites of the Hydrogenases -- 8.2.1.1 [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-Hydrogenase -- 8.2.1.2 [Fe]-Hydrogenase -- 8.2.2 The Mechanisms of the Hydrogenases -- 8.3 Natural Biosynthesis and Synthetic Analogs of the Active Sites -- 8.3.1 Natural Biosynthesis of Hydrogenase Active Sites -- 8.3.1.1 Biosynthesis of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase -- 8.3.1.2 Biosynthesis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase -- 8.3.2 Synthetic Analogs -- 8.3.2.1 Models of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site -- 8.3.2.2 Models of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site -- 8.3.2.3 Models of the [Fe]-Hydrogenase Active Site -- 8.4 Comments and Conclusion -- References -- 9. Bio-Organometallic Systems for the Hydrogen Economy: Engineering of Electrode Materials and Light-Driven Devices -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Electrode Materials for Hydrogen Evolution and Uptake -- 9.2.1 Electrode Materials-Based on Hydrogenases -- 9.2.2 Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electrodes Based on Hydrogenases -- 9.2.3 Electrode Materials Based on Bio-inspired Molecular Catalysts -- 9.2.3.1 Covalent Attachment of Catalyst to Electrode Material -- 9.2.3.2 Noncovalent Attachment of Catalyst to Electrode Material via π-π Stacking Interaction -- 9.3 Light-Driven Systems for Hydrogen Evolution -- 9.3.1 Biological and Biohybrid Systems -- 9.3.2 Bio-inspired Catalysis Approaches -- 9.3.2.1 Iron-Based Catalysts -- 9.3.2.2 Nickel-Based Catalysts -- 9.3.2.3 First Approaches toward Molecular-Based Photoelectrodes -- 9.4 Artificial Photosynthetic Systems -- 9.5 Summary and Conclusions -- List of Abbreviations -- References -- 10. Artificial Metalloenzymes Containing an Organometallic Active Site -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Dative Anchoring -- 10.2.1 Metalloproteins as Protein Hosts -- 10.2.2 Other Protein Hosts -- 10.3 Supramolecular Anchoring -- 10.3.1 (Strept)avidin as Protein Hosts -- 10.3.2 Antibodies as Protein Hosts
10.3.3 Other Protein Hosts
An up-to-date reference reflecting the significant advances and important breakthroughs made in this emerging discipline over the last decade. As such, the book provides an overview of the latest developments and future trends in the field, focusing on such applications as the development of potentially active organometallic drugs against incurable diseases, as well as in such areas as catalysis, energy, analytical chemistry, and imaging. The renowned editor, who established the term "bioorganometallics", and his international team of experts have put together a valuable resource for researchers in organometallic, inorganic, medicinal, and biochemistry
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Jaouen, Gérard Bioorganometallic Chemistry : Applications in Drug Discovery, Biocatalysis, and Imaging Weinheim : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2015 9783527335275
Subject Organometallic compounds.;Biochemistry
Electronic books
Alt Author Salmain, Michèle
Salmain, Michèle
Salmain, Mich Le
Record:   Prev Next