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Author Hickok, Gregory
Title Neurobiology of Language
Imprint San Diego : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2015
©2016
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (1188 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Front Cover -- Neurobiology of Language -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Contributors -- Acknowledgement -- A. Introduction -- 1 The Neurobiology of Language -- 1.1 History -- 1.2 Lesion Analysis -- 1.3 From Neuropsychology to Cognitive Neuroscience -- 1.4 The Neurobiology of Language -- 1.5 Some Common Fallacies -- 1.6 Humans in Particular -- 1.7 Cognition and the Neurobiology of Language -- 1.8 Brain Disease, Treatment, and the Neurobiology of Language -- 1.9 Summary -- References -- B. Neurobiological Foundations -- 2 A Molecular Genetic Perspective on Speech and Language -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Discovery of FOXP2 -- 2.3 FOXP2 Mutations in Speech and Language Disorders -- 2.4 Functions of FOXP2: The View from the Bench -- 2.5 Insights from Animal Models -- 2.6 FOXP2 in Human Evolution -- 2.7 Conclusions -- References -- 3 The Ventrolateral Frontal Region -- 3.1 Cytoarchitectonic Areas of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex -- 3.2 Parietal and Temporal Cortico-Cortical Connection Patterns of the Language Production Areas in the Ventrolateral Fronta... -- 3.3 Functional Implications -- 3.4 Non-Ventrolateral Prefrontal Areas and Their Possible Role in Language -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 4 On the Neuroanatomy and Functional Role of the Inferior Parietal Lobule and Intraparietal Sulcus -- 4.1 Gross Anatomy of the IPL and IPS -- 4.2 Modern Parcellation of the IPL and IPS -- 4.2.1 Human -- 4.2.2 Monkey -- 4.3 Connectivity of the IPL and IPS -- 4.3.1 Human -- 4.3.2 Monkey -- 4.4 Anatomical Differences Between Humans and Monkeys -- 4.5 Functions and Functional Connectivity of the IPL and IPS -- 4.5.1 Language and Speech -- 4.5.2 Motor Functions and Interaction with Objects -- 4.5.3 Spatial Functions -- 4.6 Summary -- References -- 5 Human Auditory Cortex -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Cortical Field Maps
5.3 Tonotopy: The First Dimension of AFMs -- 5.4 Cortical Organization of the Monkey Auditory System -- 5.5 Cortical Organization of the Human Auditory System -- 5.6 Periodotopy: The Second Dimension of AFMs -- 5.7 Similarities to AFM Organization in the Human Visual System -- 5.8 "Clover Leaf" Clusters Across Senses -- 5.9 Conclusion -- References -- 6 Motor Cortex and Mirror System in Monkeys and Humans -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Anatomy of the Monkey Motor Cortex -- 6.2.1 The Agranular Frontal Cortex -- 6.2.2 Cortical Connections of the Motor Areas -- 6.2.3 Area F5: Anatomical Subdivisions -- 6.2.4 Motor Properties of Area F5: The Vocabulary of Motor Acts -- 6.2.5 Canonical Neurons and the Visuomotor Transformation for Grasping -- 6.2.6 Mirror Neurons and Action Understanding -- 6.2.7 Mirror Neurons in the Parietal and the Primary Motor Cortex -- 6.2.7.1 Primary Motor Cortex -- 6.2.7.2 Parietal Cortex -- 6.3 The Human Motor Cortex -- 6.3.1 The Mirror Mechanism in Humans -- 6.3.2 Imitation -- 6.4 Motor System and Communication -- 6.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgment -- References -- 7 Cerebellar Contributions to Speech and Language -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Macroscopic and Microscopic Anatomy of the Human Cerebellum -- 7.3 Comparative Anatomic Perspectives on Size and Composition of the Cerebellum -- 7.4 Cerebellar Support of Motor Control in Humans: Upper Limb Movements -- 7.5 Contributions of the Cerebellum to Speech Motor Control -- 7.5.1 The Profile of Ataxic Dysarthria: Auditory-Perceptual and Instrumental Studies -- 7.5.2 The Syndrome of Cerebellar Mutism: Impaired Initiation of Speech Production? -- 7.5.3 Functional Imaging Data Related to Speech Production -- 7.6 Engagement of the Cerebellum in Nonmotor Functions -- 7.6.1 The Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome -- 7.6.2 Lexical-Semantic and Syntactic Disorders of Spoken Language
7.6.3 Contributions of the Cerebellum to Nonmotor Functions: Speech and Nonspeech Auditory Perception -- 7.7 Conclusion -- References -- 8 The Anatomy of the Basal Ganglia -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Historical Background -- 8.3 Overview of Basal Ganglia Anatomy -- 8.3.1 Inputs to the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.2 Outputs from the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.3 Pathways Through the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.4 Dopamine in the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.5 Functional Circuits Through the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.6 Disorders of the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.7 Learning and Memory and the Basal Ganglia -- 8.3.8 Summary -- 8.4 The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Speech Motor Control -- 8.5 The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Language -- 8.6 Segregated Functional Loops for Speech and Language -- 8.7 Summary -- References -- 9 The Thalamus and Language -- 9.1 Overview of Thalamic Organization -- 9.2 Defining the Role of the Thalamus in Language -- 9.3 A Thalamic "Locus" for Language? -- 9.4 Imaging of the Thalamus in Language Tasks -- 9.4.1 Models of the Role of the Thalamus in Language -- 9.5 Thalamic Circuitry and Physiology -- 9.6 Models of Thalamus and Language -- 9.7 Summary and Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 10 The Insular Cortex -- 10.1 Gross Anatomy -- 10.2 Cytoarchitecture -- 10.3 Vasculature -- 10.4 Connectivity -- 10.5 Insular Cortex and Behavior -- 10.6 Association with Speech-Language Behavior -- References -- 11 White Matter Pathways in the Human -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Projection Pathways -- 11.2.1 Motor Corticospinal Tract and Somatosensory Thalamocortical Pathways -- 11.2.2 Optic Radiations -- 11.3 Long-Distance Association Pathways -- 11.3.1 The Dorsal Superior Longitudinal Fascicle/Arcuate Fascicle Complex -- 11.3.1.1 Anatomy -- 11.3.1.2 Structural-Functional Correlations -- 11.3.2 The Ventral Stream -- 11.3.2.1 Anatomy
11.3.2.2 Structural-Functional Correlations -- 11.4 Implication of a Hodotopical View of Brain Organization in Humans: Rethinking the Connectivity of Language and Its Rel... -- 11.5 The Limiting Role of Axonal Connectivity in Brain Plasticity -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- C. Behavioral Foundations -- 12 Phonology -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Speech Sounds and the MAP Loop -- 12.2.1 Action or Articulation of Speech -- 12.2.2 Perception or Audition of Speech -- 12.2.3 Memory or the Long-Term Storage of Speech -- 12.3 Features or the Internal Composition of Sounds -- 12.4 Local Sound Combinations and Chunking -- 12.5 Nonlocal Sound Combinations -- 12.6 Summary -- References -- 13 Morphology -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Why Morphology? -- 13.3 What Makes Morphology, Morphology -- 13.4 Types of Morphemes, Types of Morphologies, Types of Morphological Theories -- 13.5 The View from Above -- 13.6 Words and Rules: The Modern Consensus on Decomposition -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 14 Syntax and the Cognitive Neuroscience of Syntactic Structure Building -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 A Brief History of Syntactic Theory -- 14.3 Two Concrete Examples of Syntactic Structure-Building Computations -- 14.4 Additional Properties of Syntactic Theories That One Would Expect from a Theory of Cognitive Computations -- 14.5 The Collaboration Necessary to Engage in This Program -- 14.6 Challenges to This Research Program -- 14.7 Conclusion -- References -- 15 Speech Perception as a Perceptuo-Motor Skill -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.1.1 Perception and Action are Inextricably Integrated -- 15.1.2 Parity in Speech -- 15.2 Research Findings -- 15.2.1 Speech -- 15.2.2 Nonspeech -- 15.2.2.1 Nonlanguage -- 15.2.2.2 Language, Not Speech -- 15.3 Conclusion -- References -- 16 Speech Perception -- 16.1 Introduction
16.2 Effects of Auditory Distinctiveness on the Form of Speech -- 16.3 Effects of Auditory Interaction on the Form of Speech -- 16.4 Effects of Learnability on the Form of Speech -- 16.5 Moving Forward -- References -- 17 Understanding Speech in the Context of Variability -- 17.1 Speech and Speakers -- 17.2 The Lack of Invariance Problem -- 17.3 Adaptive Processing and Perceptual Learning -- 17.4 Empirical Evidence for Active Processing in Talker Normalization -- 17.5 Toward an Active Theory of Contextual Normalization -- 17.6 Neurobiological Theories of Speech Perception -- 17.7 Subcortical Structures and Adaptive Processing -- 17.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 18 Successful Speaking: Cognitive Mechanisms of Adaptation in Language Production -- 18.1 Language Production -- 18.1.1 Lexical Access -- 18.1.2 Grammatical Encoding -- 18.1.3 Phonological Encoding -- 18.2 Long-Term speaker Tuning: Implicit Learning -- 18.2.1 Implicit Learning of Words and Phrases -- 18.2.2 Structural Priming -- 18.2.3 Phonotactic Learning -- 18.3 Short-Term Speaker Tuning -- 18.3.1 Error Monitoring -- 18.3.2 Availability-Based Production -- 18.3.3 Information-Density Sensitivity -- 18.3.4 Audience Design -- 18.4 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 19 Speech Motor Control from a Modern Control Theory Perspective -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 The Role of the CNS in Processing Sensory Feedback During Speaking -- 19.3 The CNS as a Feedforward Source of Speech Motor Commands -- 19.4 Current Models of the Role of the CNS in Speech Motor Control -- 19.5 The Concept of Dynamical State -- 19.6 A Model of Speech Motor Control Based on State Feedback -- 19.7 SFC Models Motor Actions as an Optimal Control Process -- 19.8 Speaking Behaves Like an Optimal Control Process -- 19.9 SFC Explains the Task-Specific Role of the CNS in Speech Feedback Processing
19.10 Is SFC Neurally Plausible?
Neurobiology of Language explores the study of language, a field that has seen tremendous progress in the last two decades. Key to this progress is the accelerating trend toward integration of neurobiological approaches with the more established understanding of language within cognitive psychology, computer science, and linguistics. This volume serves as the definitive reference on the neurobiology of language, bringing these various advances together into a single volume of 100 concise entries. The organization includes sections on the field's major subfields, with each section covering both empirical data and theoretical perspectives. "Foundational" neurobiological coverage is also provided, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, genetics, linguistic, and psycholinguistic data, and models. Foundational reference for the current state of the field of the neurobiology of language Enables brain and language researchers and students to remain up-to-date in this fast-moving field that crosses many disciplinary and subdisciplinary boundaries Provides an accessible entry point for other scientists interested in the area, but not actively working in it - e.g., speech therapists, neurologists, and cognitive psychologists Chapters authored by world leaders in the field - the broadest, most expert coverage available
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Hickok, Gregory Neurobiology of Language San Diego : Elsevier Science & Technology,c2015 9780124077942
Subject Biolinguistics.;Computational linguistics.;Language and languages -- Origin.;Language.;Neurolinguistics.;Neuropsychology
Electronic books
Alt Author Small, Steven L
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