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Author Steiner, Lisa
Title Molecular Aspects of Innate and Adaptive Immunity
Imprint Cambridge : Royal Society of Chemistry, 2008
©2008
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (312 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Molecular Aspects of Innate and Adaptive Immunity -- Contents -- Section 1 Antibodies -- Chapter 1 R. R. Porter and the Structure of Antibodies -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 The Papain Fragments -- 1.3 The Four-chain Model -- 1.4 V and C Regions of Immunoglobulin Chains -- References -- Chapter 2 Chemical Engineering of Therapeutic Antibodies -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.1.1 Structure of IgG -- 2.1.2 Availability of SH Groups -- 2.1.3 Enzymic Dissections -- 2.2 Useful Chemistry of SH Groups and SS Bonds -- 2.2.1 SS Interchange -- 2.2.2 Alkylation of SH Groups by Maleimides -- 2.3 Engineering IgG Modules -- 2.3.1 Attaching the PDM Linker to Fcγ -- 2.3.2 Attaching the PDM Linker to Fab'γ -- 2.3.3 Examples of Therapeutic Constructs -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Section 2 The Complement System -- Chapter 3 The Evolution of Complement Systems -- 3.1 Phylogeny in the MRC Immunochemistry Unit -- 3.2 Evolution of Immune Systems -- 3.3 Evolution of the Complement System -- 3.3.1 The Complement Pathways -- 3.3.2 Loss and Gain of Complement Components in Some Evolutionary Lines -- 3.4 Phylogeny of the Complement System -- 3.4.1 Recognition Molecules -- Ficolins, MBL and C1q -- 3.4.2 Initiation Enzymes -- Factor D, MASPs, C1r and C1s -- 3.4.3 Thioester Proteins: C3, C4, C5, α2M, CD109 and Insect Thioester Proteins -- 3.4.4 Amplification Enzymes -- C2 and Factor B -- 3.4.5 Lytic Proteins -- C6, C7, C8 and C9 -- 3.4.6 Control Proteins and Receptors -- 3.4.7 Possible Origins of Complement -- 3.5 Summary -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 4 Structure and Function of the C1 Complex: A Historical Perspective -- 4.1 From the Antibody to the C1 Complex of Complement -- 4.2 Biochemistry of C1q and Elucidation of its Primary Structure -- 4.3 Biochemistry of C1r and C1s and the C1 Activation Mechanism -- 4.3.1 Biochemistry of C1r and C1s
4.3.2 Insights into the C1 Activation Mechanism -- 4.3.3 The Primary Structure of C1r -- 4.4 From the Domain Structure of C1r and C1s to a Model of C1 Architecture -- 4.4.1 The N-terminal Interaction Domains -- 4.4.2 The C-terminal Catalytic Domains -- 4.4.3 A Low-resolution C1 Model -- 4.5 The Era of Structural Biology -- 4.5.1 A Three-dimensional C1 Model -- 4.5.2 C1r Activation and the Triggering Signal -- 4.5.3 C1q: Binding Versatility Arises from Modularity -- 4.6 Conclusions and Perspectives -- References -- Chapter 5 Complement Components C3 and C4 -- 5.1 The Road to Oxford -- 5.2 The Autolytic Cleavage Reaction -- 5.3 Red Wine and the Isotypes of C4 -- 5.4 LOO-3, the Anti-C4 Monoclonal Antibody that Only Worked for Us -- 5.5 How to Catch Up from Three Years Behind -- 5.6 C4K and C4Y -- 5.7 The Best Beer that I had Ever Tasted -- 5.8 Silence is Golden, but could be Painful -- 5.9 A Bet that I both Won, and Lost -- 5.10 Final Comments -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 6 Complement Control Proteins and Receptors: From FH to CR4 -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Factor H -- 6.3 Factor I -- 6.4 C4b-Binding Protein and Properdin -- 6.5 Complement Receptors -- 6.6 Complement Research into its Third Century -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 7 Biology and Genetics of Complement C4 -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Early Days in Oxford -- 7.3 Linkage of Innate and Adaptive Immunity -- 7.4 C4 and Autoimmunity -- 7.5 Anti-RNA Mouse Model -- 7.6 Models for C4 in B Cell Tolerance -- 7.7 Summary -- References -- Section 3 Collectins and Ficolins in Innate Immunity -- Chapter 8 The Structure of Mannan-binding Lectin and its Functional Relevance -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 MBL was Purified as a 'By-product' -- 8.3 MBL Structure, Genetics and Heterogeneity in Size -- 8.4 Concluding Remarks -- References
Chapter 9 Personal Accounts of the Discovery of MASP-2 and its Role in the MBL Pathway of Complement Activation -- 9.1 Preamble -- 9.2 The Oxonian Connection -- 9.3 MASP and the Serine Proteases of the Complement System -- 9.4 Gene Characterization in the Pre-genomic Age: Discovering MASP-2 -- 9.5 Beyond Finding MASP-2 -- 9.6 MASP-3: One Gene, Two Enzymes -- 9.7 End Note -- References -- Chapter 10 The Structure and Function of Ficolins, MBLs and MASPs -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 MBL and Ficolins in the Innate Immune System -- 10.3 Genetics of MBLs and Ficolins -- 10.3.1 Genetics and Tissue Distributions of MBLs -- 10.3.2 Genetics and Tissue Distributions of Ficolins -- 10.4 Structural Organization of MBLs and Ficolins -- 10.5 Target Recognition by MBLs and Ficolins -- 10.5.1 Sugar Recognition by MBLs -- 10.5.2 Ligand binding by Ficolins -- 10.6 Interactions between MBLs, Ficolins and MASPs -- 10.7 Mechanism of Complement Activation in the Lectin Pathway -- 10.8 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 11 Surfactant Protein D and Glycoprotein -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Domain Organization and Expression -- 11.3 Gp-340, Agglutinin, DMBT1 and Immune Functions -- 11.4 DMBT1gp-340 and its Interaction with SP-D -- 11.5 DMBT1 and its Interaction with Other Host Molecules -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- Section 4 Cell Surface Proteins - Immunoglobulin Superfamily and Integrins -- Chapter 12 Leukocyte Surface Proteins - Purification and Characterization -- 12.1 Background -- 12.1.1 Quantitation of Cell Surface Proteins -- 12.1.2 Was there a Receptor on T Cells that Incorporated Ig Variable Regions? -- 12.1.3 Assays that Worked in Detergent -- 12.1.4 Thy-1 - The Pioneer for Characterizing a Lymphocyte Membrane Protein -- 12.1.5 Solubilization of Surface Proteins -- 12.1.6 Purification Using Lectin Affinity Columns -- 12.1.7 Antibody Affinity Columns
12.1.8 Biochemical Analysis of Thy-1 -- 12.1.9 Amino Acid Sequence Analysis -- 12.1.10 Monoclonal Antibodies to Recognize New Cell Surface Proteins -- 12.1.11 The Immunoglobulin Superfamily Concept -- 12.1.12 The Follow-up -- 12.2 The Legacy -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 13 Cell Surface Integrins -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 From Complement Proteins to Integrins -- 13.3 Integrins as Modular Proteins -- 13.4 The Flow of Conformational Changes in Integrin During its Activation -- 13.5 Concluding Remarks -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Section 5 Immunogenetics and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class III Analysis 232 -- Chapter 14 Molecular Genetics of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class III Region -- 14.1 Foreword by Duncan Campbell -- 14.2 Physical Mapping of the Major Histocompatibility Complex -- 14.3 Sequence Analysis of the MHC and Annotation of the Genes -- 14.4 Genetic Analysis of the Complement Genes -- 14.4.1 Polymorphism of C4 -- 14.4.2 Deficiency of C4 -- 14.4.3 Polymorphism and Deficiency of C2 -- 14.4.4 Polymorphism and Deficiency of Factor B -- 14.5 Disease Association Studies -- 14.5.1 Candidate Gene Studies -- 14.5.2 Multiple Marker Studies -- 14.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 15 Functional Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class III Region Genes -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Genes that Encode Cell Surface Receptors -- 15.2.1 G6B -- 15.2.2 G6F -- 15.2.3 Lymphocyte Antigen 6 Superfamily Members LY6G6C, LY6G6D, LY6G6E, LY6G5B and LY6G5C -- 15.2.4 Activating Natural Killer Receptor -- 15.2.5 Butyrophilin-like Protein 2 -- 15.2.6 Advanced Glycosylation End-products Receptor -- 15.2.7 Leukocyte-specific Transcript 1 -- 15.3 Genes that Encode Cytokines -- 15.3.1 Tumour Necrosis Factor -- 15.3.2 Lymphotoxin-α and -β -- 15.3.3 Allograft Inflammatory Factor 1
15.4 Genes that Encode Proteins Involved in Response to Stress -- 15.4.1 70 kDa Heat Shock Proteins HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L -- 15.4.2 Activating Transcription Factor 6β -- 15.4.3 FK-506 Binding Protein-like -- 15.5 Genes that Encode Proteins Involved in Protein Ubiquitination -- 15.5.1 E3 Ubiquitin-protein Ligase RNF5 -- 15.5.2 Scythe (BAT3) -- 15.6 Genes that Encode Proteins Involved in Transcriptional Control -- 15.6.1 Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase 19 -- 15.6.2 Negative Elongation Factor Polypeptide E -- 15.6.3 Nuclear Factor of Kappa Light Chain Gene Enhancer in B Cells Inhibitor-like 1 (NFKBIL1) -- 15.6.4 Euchromatic Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2 -- 15.7 Genes that Encoding Proteins Involved in mRNA Processing -- 15.8 Genes that Encode Proteins Involved in Cell Signalling -- 15.8.1 Neurogenic Locus Notch Homologue Protein 4 -- 15.8.2 Casein Kinase II β Subunit -- 15.9 Genes that Encode Enzymes -- 15.9.1 Sialidase -- 15.9.2 G2 Subunit of Vacuolar H+-ATPase -- 15.10 Conclusions -- References -- Section 6 Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins in Inflammation -- Chapter 16 Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins in Inflammation -- 16.1 About the Authors -- 16.2 Introduction and Historical Perspective -- 16.3 Structural and Molecular Studies on Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins -- 16.3.1 TSG-6 and Type A HABD -- 16.3.2 Type C HABD in the Link Proteins and Lecticans -- 16.3.3 Type B HABD of CD44 -- 16.4 Investigating TSG-6 Biology -- 16.4.1 TSG-6 in Ovulation -- 16.4.2 TSG-6 in Arthritis and Inflammatory Disease -- 16.5 Summary and Final Thoughts -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Subject Index
This book brings together central themes covering proteins of the immune system with special emphasis on the protein chemistry of the system
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Steiner, Lisa Molecular Aspects of Innate and Adaptive Immunity Cambridge : Royal Society of Chemistry,c2008 9780854046980
Subject Natural immunity.;Molecular immunology
Electronic books
Alt Author Stevenson, George T
Law, Alex
Dodds, Alister W
Arlaud, Gerard J
Carroll, Mike
Jensenius, Jens Chr
Vorup-Jensen, Thomas
Palaniyar, Nades
Holmskov, Uffe
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