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Author Waern, Y
Title Cooperative Process Management : Cognition and Information Technology
Imprint London : Taylor & Francis Group, 1998
©1998
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (255 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- BRIEF DESCRIPTION -- MOTIVATION -- OBJECTIVES -- PART ONE: Analyses -- CHAPTER ONE: Background -- 1.1. INTRODUCTION -- 1.2. HUMAN FACTORS PERSPECTIVE -- 1.3. FIELD STUDIES -- 1.4. COMPUTER SUPPORT -- 1.5. VARIOUS DOMAINS -- 1.6. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK -- 1.7. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER TWO: Analysis of a generic dynamic situation -- 2.1. INTRODUCTION -- 2.2. SITUATION ASSESSMENT -- 2.3. RECORDING ACTIONS -- 2.4. CO-ORDINATION ISSUES -- 2.4.1. Team, group or distributed cognition? -- 2.4.2. Sub-tasks and roles -- 2.4.3. Efficient co-ordination? -- 2.4.4. Shared situation awareness -- 2.4.5. Sharing resources and co-ordination of action -- 2.4.6. Shared co-ordination model and cognitive empathy -- 2.4.7. Co-ordination architectures -- 2.5. SUMMARY -- 2.6. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER THREE: Task analysis and its relevance for team work -- 3.1. INTRODUCTION -- 3.2. HIERARCHICAL TASK ANALYSIS -- 3.3. TEAM ACTIVITIES -- 3.4. BALANCING WORKLOAD BY TEAM ORGANIZATION IN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL -- 3.5. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER FOUR: Context, cognition and control -- 4.1. THE NEED FOR MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR -- 4.1.1. Maintaining control -- 4.1.2. Requirements of modelling -- 4.1.3. Flowchart models -- 4.1.4. Orderliness and control -- 4.2. CONTROL AND COGNITION -- 4.2.1. Inner worlds and outer worlds -- 4.2.2. The sequentiality of cognition -- 4.3. MODELLING APPROACHES -- 4.3.1. Procedural prototypes -- 4.4. COMPETENCE, CONTROL, AND CONSTRUCTS -- 4.4.1. Competence -- 4.4.2. Control -- 4.4.3. Control modes and attention -- 4.4.4. Constructs -- 4.4.5. Interaction between competence, control, and constructs -- 4.5. ISSUES IN CONTEXTUAL CONTROL MODELS -- 4.5.1. COCOM parameters -- 4.5.2. Functional relations in COCOM -- 4.5.3. How does context affect control? -- 4.6. CONCLUSION
4.7. REFERENCES -- PART TWO: Field Studies -- CHAPTER FIVE: Team decision-making and situation awareness in military command and control -- 5.1. INTRODUCTION -- 5.2. TEAM DECISION-MAKING -- 5.3. RESEARCH QUESTIONS -- 5.4. METHOD -- 5.5. THE CONTROL ROOM -- 5.5.1. Staff and responsibilities -- 5.5.2. Artifacts -- 5.5.3. Procedures that must be accomplished -- 5.6. TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURES -- 5.7. INTERACTION PATTERNS -- 5.7.1. Serial work organization: team 1 -- 5.7.2. Parallel work organization: team 2 -- 5.8. MANAGING BREAKDOWNS -- 5.9. CONCLUSIONS -- 5.10. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- 5.11. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER SIX: Creation and loss of cognitive empathy at an emergency control centre -- 6.1. INTRODUCTION -- 6.2. PRESENTATION OF AN EMERGENCY CONTROL CENTRE -- 6.3. " TALKING TO THE ROOM " AND COGNITIVE EMPATHY -- 6.4. CREATION OF COGNITIVE EMPATHY -- 6.5. LOSS OF COGNITIVE EMPATHY -- 6.6. CONCLUSION -- 6.7. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT -- 6.8. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER SEVEN: Utilization of information technology in navigational decision-making -- 7.1. INTRODUCTION -- 7.2. DYNAMIC DECISION-MAKING ON BRIDGE -- 7.2.1. Analysis of human errors -- 7.2.2. Analysis of decision-making in natural situations -- 7.3. DIVISION OF WORK BETWEEN THE NAVIGATOR AND BRIDGE AUTOMATION -- 7.3.1. Ironies of automation -- 7.3.2. Appropriateness of bridge information systems -- 7.3.2.1. Control of the ship's movements: the predictor display -- 7.3.2.2. Aiding navigation and positioning: ECDIS -- 7.4. TRAINING FOR PRESENT AND FUTURE NAVIGATION SYSTEMS -- 7.5. CONCLUSIONS -- 7.6. REFERENCES -- PART THREE: Microworld Studies -- CHAPTER EIGHT: The C3FIRE microworld -- 8.1. INTRODUCTION -- 8.2. MICROWORLD SYSTEMS -- 8.3. REQUIREMENTS TO BE MET BY C3FIRE -- 8.3.1. Dynamic context -- 8.3.2. Distributed decision-making -- 8.3.3 Time-scales -- 8.3.4 Investigation and training experimentation
8.4. WORLD SIMULATION -- 8.4.1. Vegetation and houses -- 8.4.2. Wind -- 8.4.3. Fire -- 8.4.4. Fire-fighting unit -- 8.4.5. Reconnaissance persons -- 8.5. FIRE-FIGHTING ORGANIZATION -- 8.5.1 Emergency alarm centre -- 8.5.2. Staff -- 8.5.3. Fire-fighting unit chiefs -- 8.5.4. Fire-fighting units -- 8.5.5. Reconnaissance person -- 8.5.6. External actors -- 8.6. USER INTERFACE -- 8.6.1. The map -- 8.6.2. The message system -- 8.7. SESSION MANAGEMENT -- 8.7.1. Configuration -- 8.7.2. Scenario -- 8.7.3. Replay -- 8.8. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER NINE: Visualized co-ordination support in distributed decision-making -- 9.1. INTRODUCTION -- 9.2. BACKGROUND -- 9.2.1. Objective -- 9.3. METHOD -- 9.3.1. Subjects -- 9.3.2. Experimental task -- 9.3.3. Design -- 9.3.4. Procedure -- 9.4. RESULTS -- 9.4.1. Number of cells lost to fire -- 9.4.2. Frequency of messages -- 9.4.3. Message types -- 9.5. DISCUSSION -- 9.6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- 9.7. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER TEN: Co-operation and situation awareness within and between time-scales in dynamic decision-making -- 10.1. BACKGROUND -- 10.1.1. Co-operation between and within time-scales -- 10.1.2. Situation awareness and situation assessment within local teams -- 10.2. METHOD -- 10.2.1. General description of the C3FIRE microworld -- 10.2.2. Details of the C3FIRE set-up -- 10.2.3. Independent variables and design -- 10.2.4. Subjects -- 10.2.5. Procedure -- 10.3. RESULTS -- 10.3.1. Overall effectiveness of the teams -- 10.3.2. Communication and co-operation between time-scales -- 10.3.3. Situation awareness and co-operation within the commander team -- 10.3.4. Information value -- 10.4. DISCUSSION -- 10.5. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER ELEVEN: Effects of time pressure in fully connected and hierarchical architectures of distributed decision-making -- 11.1. INTRODUCTION -- 11.2. METHOD -- 11.2.1. Subjects -- 11.2.2. Simulation
11.2.3. Design -- 11.2.4. Procedure -- 11.3. RESULTS -- 11.3.1. Time per trial -- 11.3.2. Performance -- 11.4. COMMUNICATION -- 11.4.1. Number of messages -- 11.4.2. Message content -- 11.5. DISCUSSION -- 11.6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- 11.7. REFERENCES -- PART FOUR: Training -- CHAPTER TWELVE: Co-ordination training in Emergency Management -- 12.1. THE ISSUE OF CO-ORDINATION IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT WORK SYSTEMS -- 12.2. AN AGENDA OF TRAINING NEEDS FOR CO-ORDINATION -- 12.2.1. Training needs for co-ordinated plans -- 12.2.2. Training needs for co-ordinated action -- 12.2.3. Training needs for co-ordinated communications -- 12.2.4. Training needs for co-ordinated role and task knowledge -- 12.3. EVALUATION OF TABLE TOP TRAINING -- 12.3.1. Training co-ordinated planning -- 12.3.2. Training co-ordinated action -- 12.3.3. Training co-ordinated communication -- 12.3.4. Training co-ordinated knowledge -- 12.3.5. Summary of evaluation -- 12.4. COMPUTER-BASED TRAINING SIMULATORS FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT -- 12.4.1. Iccarus -- 12.5. CONTRIBUTIONS TO COGNITIVE ENGINEERING AND THE SPECIFICATION OF CO-ORDINATION TRAINING -- 12.6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT -- 12.7. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Microworld systems for emergency management training -- 13.1. INTRODUCTION -- 13.2. BACKGROUND -- 13.3. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TRAINING -- 13.3.1. Emergency management -- 13.3.1.1. Complex dynamic systems -- 13.3.1.2. Distributed decision-making -- 13.3.2. Training emergency management -- 13.3.2.1. Training goals -- 13.3.2.2. Simulation in training systems -- 13.3.2.3. Training organization -- 13.4.1. Training description -- 13.4.1.1. Game preparation -- 13.4.1.2. Game Phase -- 13.4.1.3. Game evaluation -- 13.4.2. Reflections on field study -- 13.4.3. Concluding requirements of the simulation -- 13.5. THE C3FIRE PROJECT -- 13.5.1. Requirements -- 13.5.1.1. Task environment requirements
13.5.1.2. Computer-Based simulation support -- 13.5.1.3. Session control -- 13.5.2. Training goals -- 13.6. SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT -- 13.6.1. Task environment simulation in C3FIRE -- 13.6.2. Agent simulation -- 13.6.3. Information generation -- 13.6.4. Session control -- 13.6.5. Development results -- 13.7. AN EVALUATION OF C3FIRE -- 13.7.1. The task environment -- 13.7.2. Information flow -- 13.7.2.1. Information load -- 13.7.2.2. Help, problem-making and knowledge-check information -- 13.7.2.3. Message flow -- 13.8. CONCLUSIONS -- 13.8.1. Microworlds -- 13.8.2. Pedagogical session control -- 13.9. REFERENCES -- PART FIVE: Computer Artifacts -- CHAPTER FOURTEEN: In search of organizational memory in process control -- 14.1. INTRODUCTION -- 14.2. RESEARCH SETTING AND RESEARCH METHODS -- 14.3. ORGANIZATIONAL MEMORY, LEARNING, AND INTERACTION -- 14.4. ORGANIZATIONAL MEMORY IN PROCESS CONTROL -- 14.4.1. The work in process control -- 14.4.2. The expertise and learning in process control -- 14.4.3. The need to remember -- 14.4.5. Breakdowns -- 14.4.6. Interactions in process control -- 14.4.7. Dynamics of process control -- 14.5. TOOLS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL MEMORY -- 14.5.1. Tools for organizational memory, learning, and interaction -- 14.5.2. The SHAMAN approach -- 14.6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- 14.7. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Knowledge management for collective learning and organizational memory -- 15.1. INTRODUCTION -- 15.2. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION -- 15.3. REVIEW OF KNOWLEDGE-BASED EXPERT SYSTEMS -- 15.4. DISCUSSION -- 15.4.1. Knowledge management for individual and organizational learning -- 15.4.2. Control of the "knowledge capital -- 15.4.3. Knowledge systems and professional integrity -- 15.5. CONCLUSION -- 15.6. REFERENCES -- CHAPTER SIXTEEN: Knowledge graphs in group learning -- 16.1. INTRODUCTION
16.2. THE CONTEXT OF THE PROBLEM
Covering analysis, field studies, micro-world studies, training and the creation of computer artefacts under the Co-operative Process Management umbrella. This book should be of interest to those engaged in research or building applications in a
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Waern, Y Cooperative Process Management: Cognition and Information Technology London : Taylor & Francis Group,c1998 9780748407132
Subject Project management.;Computer software -- Human factors.;Information technology.;Decision making -- Data processing
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