LEADER 00000nam  2200373   4500 
001    AAI3141940 
005    20051103093541.5 
008    051103s2004                        eng d 
020    0496008730 
035    (UnM)AAI3141940 
040    UnM|cUnM 
100 1  Wall, Anne Sauder 
245 13 An evaluation of the computer self-efficacy of preservice 
       teachers 
300    129 p 
500    Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 65-
       08, Section: A, page: 2956 
500    Director: Dean Roberts 
502    Thesis (Ed.D.)--Tennessee State University, 2004 
520    Preservice teachers with lower computer self-efficacy are 
       more likely to have problems with technology integration 
       when they exit their teacher education programs and teach 
       in their own classrooms. This study identified differences
       in the computer self-efficacy between subgroups of 
       preservice teachers at Austin Peay State University and 
       Tennessee State University 
520    The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale, a 30 question survey, 
       was given to 121 preservice teachers during the spring 
       semester of 2004. Descriptive data were analyzed, and 
       parametric and non-parametric tests were performed to 
       determine if statistically significant differences existed
       in the computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers based
       on demographic information. Participants were grouped by 
       age category, gender, ethnicity, area of licensure, credit
       hours of technology courses, access to technology, and 
       school attended 
520    Results of the study indicated the majority of the 
       preservice teachers in this study had a high to very high 
       level of computer self-efficacy. Ethnicity was found to 
       have a statistically significant effect on computer self-
       efficacy of preservice teachers. The African American 
       preservice teachers in this study had a significantly 
       higher level of computer self-efficacy than the Caucasian 
       preservice teachers. Additionally, the teacher education 
       university the preservice teachers attended was found to 
       have a statistically significant effect on their computer 
       self-efficacy when the Tennessee State University group 
       was divided into two groups: those preservice teachers who
       attended their teacher education program on the main 
       campus and those who attended on the Volunteer State 
       Community College campus. The preservice teachers who 
       attended the teacher education program at the main campus 
       of Tennessee State University had significantly higher 
       levels of computer self-efficacy than those who attended 
       the teacher education program at the Volunteer State 
       Community College campus of Tennessee State University 
590    School code: 0840 
590    DDC 
650  4 Education, Teacher Training 
650  4 Education, Technology 
650  4 Education, Curriculum and Instruction 
690    0530 
690    0710 
690    0727 
710 20 Tennessee State University 
773 0  |tDissertation Abstracts International|g65-08A 
856 40 |uhttp://pqdd.sinica.edu.tw/twdaoapp/servlet/
       advanced?query=3141940