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Author Yang, Shang-Tian
Title Bioprocessing for Value-Added Products from Renewable Resources : New Technologies and Applications
Imprint Oxford : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2006
©2007
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (685 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Front Cover -- Preface -- 2. Applications of genomic and proteomic analyses -- 3. Bioprocess analysis and optimization guided by genomic and proteomic analyses: The example of microbial production of 1,3-propanediol -- 4. Concluding remarks and outlook -- References -- 2. Directed evolution tools for diversity generation -- 3. Applications of directed evolution tools -- 4. Alternatives to directed evolution -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 2. Applications and some examples -- 3. Metabolic engineering strategies and limitations -- 4. Metabolic engineering methodologies and tools -- 5. Challenges and new approaches for metabolic engineering -- 6. Summary -- References -- 2. Amylase and cellulase classification and mechanisms -- 3. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- 2. Various types of bioreactors -- 3. Effects of process parameters on biological performances -- 4. Industrial applications of bioreactors -- 5. Trends in bioreactor engineering -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 3. Microfiltration and ultrafiltration processes -- 4. Membrane fouling -- 5. Applications in biotechnology industries -- 5.3. Other applications -- 6. Outlook -- References -- 2. Bacteria -- 3. Yeast -- 4. Fermentation products from bacteria and yeasts -- 5. Fermentation processes -- 6. Conlusion and outlook -- References -- 2. Fungal cells as biofactories -- 3. Hyphal growth and protein secretion -- 4. Fungal growth in submerged culture -- 5. Effects of cultivation conditions -- 6. Effects of morphology on production and secretion -- 7. Immobilized fungal cells -- 8. Future of filamentous fungal cells as biofactories -- References -- 2. Production of macromolecules -- 3. Production of small molecules -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 2. Modes of microalgal cultivation -- 3. Thraustochytrids -- 4. High-value products from thraustochytrids
5. Other applications of thraustochytrids -- 6. Utilization of renewable resources -- 7. Safety issues -- 8. Conclusions -- 7 References -- 2. Enzymatic treatment of biomass components -- 3. Further processing of simple renewable molecules for value-added products -- 4. New trends in enzymatic bioprocessing -- 5. Summary -- References -- 3. Chiral molecules from hydrolase -- 4. Chiral molecules from enzymes requiring cofactors -- 5. Improving enantioselectivity by reaction engineering -- 6. Improving chiral synthesis by directed evolution and metabolic engineering -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- 2. Immobilization techniques -- 3. Effects of cell immobilization -- 4. Immobilized cell bioreactors -- 5. Applications of immobilized cell technology -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- 3. New process development -- 4. Water-in-oil cultivation technology -- 5. PH-sensitive surfactants for water-in-oil cultivation -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- 2. Carboxylic acid fermentation -- 3. Integrated fermentation-separation processes -- 4. Summary and outlook -- References -- 3. Fungal metabolites -- 4. Pathway manipulation -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- 3. Advantages and unsolved problems -- 4. SSF reactors -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Nomenclature -- References -- 2. Classification of closed algal photobioreactors -- 3. Design challenges for closed algal photobioreactors -- 4. Overcoming challenges for lutein/zeaxanthin production -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- 2. Role of biocatalysts in biofuel cells -- 3. Fuel options in biofuel cells -- 4. Biocatalysis in cathode reactions -- 5. Electron transfer in biofuel cells -- 6. Immobilization of biocatalysts and mediators -- 7. Engineering aspects of biofuel cells -- 8. Overall performance of biofuel cells -- 9. Conclusion -- References -- 2. Principles of biohydrogen production systems
3. Microorganisms and enzymes for hydrogen production -- 4. Comparative studies on biohydrogen production processes -- 5. Improvements of photobiological hydrogen production -- 6. Improvements of fermentative hydrogen production -- 7. New concepts and strategies for biohydrogen production -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- 3. Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) -- 4. Biosynthesis of EPS via lactose fermentation -- 5. Future outlook -- 6. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 2. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) -- 3. Microbial PHA fermentation -- 4. Integrated bioprocessing of renewable feedstock to PHA -- 5. PHA recovery -- 6. PHA economic analysis -- 7. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 2. Chemical composition of plant lipids -- 3. Chemical modifications of fats and fatty acids -- 4. Industrial applications and technology -- 5. Issues for industrial applications of plant lipids -- References -- 2. Characterization of animal manure -- 3. Production of reducing sugars from cattle manure lignocellulosics -- 4. Cellulolytic enzyme production from dairy manure -- 5. Summary -- References
Bioprocessing for Value-Added Products from Renewable Resources provides a timely review of new and unconventional techniques to manufacture high-value products based on simple biological material. The current source for most chemicals and materials is petroleum. Anticipation of its limited future availability, along with record high prices has spurred interest in alternatives that will be both sustainable and cost-effective. In a very structured way this book begins by describing the modern technologies that form the basis for creating a bio-based industry. Next it lists the various organisms that are suitable for bioprocessing -from bacteria to algae- and it gives their unique characteristics. These first two parts set the stage for a variety of novel, experimental bioprocesses, such as the production of medicinal chemicals, the production of chiral compounds and the design of biofuel cells. Concludes with examples where biological, renewable resources become an important feedstock for large-scale industrial production. Bioprocessing for Value-Added Products from Renewable Resources provides a unique perspective of the industry and the field and serves as an important guide towards the future. The book is suitable for researchers, practitioners, students, and consultants in the bioprocess and biotechnology fields. ·Reviews the principles underpinning modern industrial biotechnology ·Provides a unique collection of novel bioprocesses for a sustainable future ·Gives examples of economical use of renewable resources as feedstocks ·Suitable for both non-experts and experts in the bioproduct industry
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Yang, Shang-Tian Bioprocessing for Value-Added Products from Renewable Resources : New Technologies and Applications Oxford : Elsevier Science & Technology,c2006 9780444521149
Subject Biochemical engineering.;Biotechnological process control.;Renewable natural resources
Electronic books
Alt Author Yang, Shang-Tian
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