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Author LEVINSON, RICHARD ALAN
Title THE CONTROL OVER VISUAL REFRACTIVE TECHNOLOGY BY THE PROFESSIONS OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC POLICY
Descript 247 p
Note Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 43-12, Section: A, page: 4036
Thesis (D.P.A.)--The George Washington University, 1983
Professions are occupational groups that have received a legal monopoly over the provision of technologically complex and socially desirable services. There has been a vigorous scholarly debate on the most appropriate social role of professions since they first reached prominence in the Western world during the 19th century. That debate has remained inconclusive because the major participants have chosen to argue from ideological positions. This study was designed to provide a method for studying the professions social role that could lead to more objective and definitive conclusions. This proposed methodology centers around an analysis of the scientific and technological validity of the services monopolized by a profession, and of the public welfare aspects of the way in which these services are provided
The methodology is applied to the technology of visual refraction and its joint control by ophthalmology and optometry. It is concluded that refraction is a discrete body of knowledge based on valid scientific principles and that its public applications are beneficial. However, it appears that refraction is too routine a technology to be monopolized by doctoral-level professions. Furthermore, their monopoly has not resulted in optimal levels of cost or accessibility for refractive services, nor has it served to advance the underlying technology. In an effort to explain the current unsatisfactory state of affairs a review is made of the historical circumstances that led to the current arrangements for delivery of refractive services. An alternative future scenario is provided that might correct the situation
The methodology of this study is generalized into a format for future exploration of professional roles, which could provide the basis for rational public policy concerning them
School code: 0075
DDC
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 43-12A
Subject Health Sciences, General
Political Science, Public Administration
0566
0617
Alt Author The George Washington University
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