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Author Brennan, Anthony B
Title Bio-Inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2014
©2014
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (416 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Wiley-Society for Biomaterials Ser
Wiley-Society for Biomaterials Ser
Note Cover -- Series page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- Introduction -- PART I: Engineering Bio-inspired Material Microenvironments -- CHAPTER 1: ECM-Inspired Chemical Cues: Biomimetic Molecules and Techniques of Immobilization -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Development and Immobilization of Biomimetic Cues in 3-D Biomaterials -- 1.2.1 Synthetic Peptides Derived from Fibronectin, Laminin, and Collagen -- 1.2.2 Carbohydrate-Binding Peptides -- 1.2.3 Glycomimetic Peptides -- 1.2.4 Growth Factors -- 1.3 Spatial Orientation and Dynamic Display -- 1.3.1 Spatially Controlled Display -- 1.3.2 Stimuli-Sensitive Dynamic Display -- 1.4 Future Perspectives -- References -- CHAPTER 2: Dynamic Materials Mimic Developmental and Disease Changes in Tissues -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Cell Scaffolds, Their Intrinsic Properties, and Their Effects on Cells -- 2.2.1 Natural Polymers and Their Properties -- 2.2.2 Synthetic Polymers and Their Properties -- 2.2.3 The Effects of Scaffolds on Cells -- 2.3 ECM is a Dynamic Tissue -- 2.4 Dynamic Scaffolds -- 2.4.1 Dynamically Stiffening Scaffolds -- 2.4.2 Degradable Scaffolds -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- CHAPTER 3: The Role of Mechanical Cues in Regulating Cellular Activities and Guiding Tissue Development -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Mechanotransduction -- 3.2.1 Mechanotransduction from Extracellular Matrix to Cytoplasmic Structures -- 3.2.2 Mechanotransduction by Cell-ECM Adhesions -- 3.2.3 Mechanotransduction by Cell-Cell Adhesions -- 3.2.4 Intracellular Molecules -- 3.2.5 AdhesionMediated Signaling Pathways -- 3.3 Mechanotransduction from Cytoplasm to Nucleus -- 3.4 Role of Mechanical Cues in Developmental Biology -- 3.5 Applications of Mechanical Stimulation in Regenerative Medicine -- 3.5.1 Articular Cartilage -- 3.5.2 Tendon/Ligament -- 3.5.3 Bone
3.5.4 Blood Vessels -- 3.6 Summary -- References -- CHAPTER 4: Contribution of Physical Forces on the Design of Biomimetic Tissue Substitutes -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.1.1 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Adhesion -- 4.1.2 Cell Adhesion to Substrates -- 4.2 Physical Forces -- 4.2.1 Mechanical Forces -- 4.2.2 Thermal Forces (NIPAM) -- 4.2.3 Electromagnetic Forces (Continuous, Pulsatile) -- 4.2.4 Hydrodynamic Forces (Shear -- Pulsatile, Compression -- Continuous) -- 4.3 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- CHAPTER 5: Cellular Responses to Bio-Inspired Engineered Topography -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 Historical Introduction to Cellular Responses to Physical Cues -- 5.1.2 Physical Cues in Nature -- 5.2 Definition of Engineered Topography -- 5.3 Surface Fabrication Techniques -- 5.3.1 Fabrication of Engineered Topography -- 5.4 Cellular Responses to 2-D Engineered Topographies -- 5.5 Cellular Responses to Dynamic, Engineered 2-D Topographies -- 5.6 Conclusions and Future Directions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- CHAPTER 6: Engineering the Mechanical and Growth Factor Signaling Roles of Fibronectin Fibrils -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Structure of Fibronectin -- 6.3 Assembly of Fibronectin Fibrils -- 6.4 Mechanics of Fibronectin Fibrils -- 6.5 Role of Fibronectin Fibrils in Cell Attachment -- 6.6 Role of Fibronectin Fibrils in Growth Factor Signaling -- 6.7 Cell-Free Mechanisms of Fibril Formation -- 6.8 Cell-Derived Fibronectin Matrices -- 6.9 Use of Fibronectin in Tissue Engineering Applications -- 6.10 Conclusions -- References -- CHAPTER 7: Biologic Scaffolds Composed of Extracellular Matrix as a Natural Material for Wound Healing -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Products and Clinical Use of ECM -- 7.3 Mechanisms of ECM Remodeling -- 7.3.1 Biologic Scaffold Degradation and Recruitment of Stem/Progenitor Cells
7.3.2 The Effect of Site-Appropriate Mechanical Loading -- 7.3.3 Modulation of the Host Innate Immune Response Toward a Regulatory and Constructive Phenotype -- 7.4 Summary -- Acknowledgment -- References -- CHAPTER 8: Bio-Inspired Integration of Natural Materials -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.1.1 Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Structure and Composition -- 8.1.2 Fundamentals of Scaffolding Using Naturally Derived Materials -- 8.2 Naturally Derived Materials -- 8.2.1 Animal Origin -- 8.2.2 Plant Origin -- 8.2.3 Algae Origin -- 8.2.4 Microbial Origin -- 8.3 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- PART II: Bio-Inspired Tissue Engineering -- CHAPTER 9: Bio-Inspired Design of Skin Replacement Therapies -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Bio-Inspiration of Skin Replacement Therapy -- 9.2.1 Observations -- 9.3 Biomimetic Solutions -- 9.3.1 Epidermal Replacement: Epicell® (Genzyme Tissue Repair) -- 9.3.2 Treatment of Chronic Wounds: Apligraf® (Organogenesis) -- 9.3.3 Dermal Regeneration: Integra® -- 9.4 Discussion -- References -- CHAPTER 10: Epithelial Engineering: From Sheets to Branched Tubes -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Inspiration from the Biology of Epithelial Morphogenesis -- 10.2.1 Collective Migration of Epithelial Sheets -- 10.2.2 Folding of Epithelial Sheets -- 10.2.3 Tubulogenesis -- 10.2.4 Branching Morphogenesis -- 10.3 Engineering Approaches to Mimic Epithelial Morphogenesis -- 10.3.1 Making a Sheet -- 10.3.2 Folding a Sheet -- 10.3.3 Making a Tube -- 10.3.4 Making a Branch -- 10.4 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- CHAPTER 11: A Biomimetic Approach toward the Fabrication of Epithelial-like Tissue -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Skin ECM and Its Function -- 11.3 Skin Tissue Engineering and Scaffold Design -- 11.3.1 Particle Leaching Technique -- 11.3.2 Emulsion Freeze-Drying -- 11.3.3 High-Pressure Gas Expansion Methods
11.3.4 Phase Separation Method -- 11.3.5 Electrospinning Technique -- 11.4 Biomimetic Approach toward the Formation of Epithelial-Like Tissue Using Electrospun Nanofibers -- 11.4.1 Incorporation of ECM Components into Electrospun Nanofibers -- 11.4.2 On-Site Layer-by-Layer Cell Assembly Approach for 3-D Tissue Formation -- 11.4.3 Formation of 3-D Epithelial-Like Tissues -- 11.5 Future Perspective and Challenge -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- CHAPTER 12: Nano- and Microstructured ECM and Biomimetic Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Structure and Function of the Myocardium -- 12.2.1 Multiscale Hierarchy of the Contractile Apparatus -- 12.2.2 Mechanical Anisotropy -- 12.2.3 Innervation and the Conduction System -- 12.2.4 Vascularization -- 12.2.5 Extracellular Matrix -- 12.3 Bio-inspired Design Requirements of Cardiac Tissue Engineering Scaffolds -- 12.4 Approaches to Fabricating ECM Biomimetic Scaffolds -- 12.4.1 Porous Scaffolds -- 12.4.2 Micro- and Nanofiber Scaffolds -- 12.4.3 Synthetic and Naturally Derived Hydrogels -- 12.4.4 Nano- and Microfabricated Scaffolds -- 12.4.5 Cell-Generated ECM Scaffolds -- 12.4.6 Decellularized ECM Scaffolds -- 12.5 Persistent Challenges -- 12.5.1 Cell Sources for Cardiomyocytes -- 12.5.2 Vascularization -- 12.6 The Future of Cardiac Tissue Engineering -- References -- CHAPTER 13: Strategies and Challenges for Bio-inspired Cardiovascular Biomaterials -- 13.1 Need for Cardiovascular Biomaterials -- 13.1.1 Cardiovascular Tissue Regeneration -- 13.1.2 Unmet Clinical Need: Incidence and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease -- 13.1.3 Need for Tissue-Engineered Solutions -- 13.2 Structure Equals Function: Focus on Strategies that Introduce Hierarchical Organization -- 13.2.1 Tissue Engineering Tools -- 13.2.2 Hierarchical Structure of the Heart and Blood Vessels
13.3 Tissue Engineering Approaches to Cardiovascular Biomaterials -- 13.3.1 Scaffolds: Foundational Architecture and Mechanical Properties -- 13.3.2 Bioreactors and Bioactive Molecules: Active Exogenous Forces -- 13.3.3 Cell Sources: Cell Phenotype and Secreted Extracellular Matrix -- 13.4 Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineering: 3-D Tissues Without Exogenous Material Complications -- 13.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- CHAPTER 14: Evaluation of Bio-inspired Materials for Mineralized Tissue Regeneration Using Type I Collagen Reporter Cells -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Collagen 1 Promoter/GFP Reporter Technology -- 14.2.1 Reporter Gene Systems -- 14.2.2 How to Make a Reporter Gene System -- 14.3 Primary Cell Harvest and Image Analysis of the Collagen Reporter Cells from Transgenic Mice -- 14.3.1 Harvesting Primary Osteoprogenitor Cells From Transgenic Mice Calvarium -- 14.3.2 In Vitro Imaging and Analysis -- 14.4 Type I Collagen/GFP Reporter System with Human Cells -- 14.5 Evaluation of Biomimetic cHA Thin Films by Collagen/GFP Reporter Cells -- 14.5.1 Biomedical and Clinical Applications of Carbonated Hydroxyapatite -- 14.5.2 Synthesis and Characterization of Thin Films of Carbonated Hydroxyapatite -- 14.5.3 Assessment of Osteogenic Properties of cHA Thin Films Using Primary Type I Collagen/GFP Reporter Cells -- 14.6 Evaluation of Fibrillar Collagen Thin Films by Primary Type I Collagen/GFP Reporter Cells -- 14.6.1 Biomedical and Clinical Applications of Fibrillar Collagen -- 14.6.2 Synthesis and Characterization of Fibrillar Thin Films of Collagen -- 14.6.3 Results of Type I Collagen/GFP Reporter Cells Technology Applied to Fibrillar Collagen Films -- 14.7 In vivo Use of Type I Collagen/GFP Reporter Mice to Screen Biomimetic Collagen/Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds -- 14.7.1 Biomedical and Clinical Applications of Collagen/Apatite Scaffolds
14.7.2 Synthesis and Characterization of the Collagen/Apatite Scaffolds
This book covers the latest bio-inspired materials synthesis techniques and biomedical applications that are advancing the field of tissue engineering.  Bio-inspired concepts for biomedical engineering are at the forefront of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scientists, engineers and physicians are working together to replicate the sophisticated hierarchical organization and adaptability found in nature and selected by evolution to recapitulate the cellular microenvironment.  This book demonstrates the dramatic clinical breakthroughs that have been made in engineering all four of the major tissue types and modulating the immune system. Part I (Engineering Bio-inspired Material Microenvironments) covers Bio-inspired Presentation of Chemical Cues, Bio-inspired Presentation of Physical Cues, and Bio-inspired Integration of Natural Materials. Part II (Bio-inspired Tissue Engineering) addresses tissue engineering in epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, connective tissue, and the immune system
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Brennan, Anthony B. Bio-Inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2014 9781118369364
Subject Biocompatible Materials.;Biomedical Engineering
Electronic books
Alt Author Kirschner, Chelsea M
Kirschner, Chelsea M
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