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Author Boeckx, Cedric
Title The Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics
Imprint New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (694 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics
Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics
Note Cover -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Contributors -- Acknowledgements -- 1 Introducing the volume -- 2 Biolinguistics: A historical perspective -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Questions in biolinguistics -- 2.3 Current research -- 3 Biolinguistics yesterday, today, and tomorrow -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Biolinguistics: The early years (Lenneberg's dream) -- 3.3 The middle period (circa 1985-2000: the low-hanging fruits of the tree) -- 3.4 The present period (ever since circa 2000: the higher fruits) -- 3.5 Design for a curriculum in biolinguistics -- 3.5.1 Basic courses -- 3.5.2 Intermediate level courses -- 3.5.3 Advanced courses -- 4 The philosophical foundations of biolinguistics -- 4.1 What is biolinguistics? -- 4.2 The methodology of naturalistic research -- 4.3 A research strategy for the naturalistic study of mind -- 4.4 The biolinguistic research program -- 4.5 Conclusion -- Part I Language development -- 5 (Evidence for) the language instinct -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Instincts and language -- 5.3 The locus of syntax in the brain -- 5.4 The instinct for syntactic categories -- 5.5 The poverty of the stimulus argument and the language instinct: Lexical acquisition -- 5.6 In lieu of an epilogue: Christopher's instinct -- 6 Sensitive phases in successive language acquisition: The critical period hypothesis revisited -- 6.1 Biological foundations of the language making capacity -- 6.2 The Critical Period Hypothesis for language acquisition -- 6.3 Successive acquisition: Differences between first and second language acquisition -- 6.4 The Critical Period Hypothesis revisited: Sensitive phases in language development -- 6.4.1 Revisiting the Critical Period Hypothesis -- 6.4.2 Sensitive phases: Possible age ranges -- 6.4.3 Sensitive phases: Grammatical domains -- 6.5 Conclusions and open questions
7 Discovering word forms and word meanings: The role of phrasal prosody and function words -- 7.1 Discovering word forms -- 7.2 Discovering word meanings -- 8 Luria's biolinguistic suggestion and the growth of language -- 8.1 Luria's biolinguistic suggestion -- 8.2 Grammatical computation in the optional infinitive stage -- 8.3 The UCC: The biology of the matter -- 8.4 Is the OI stage simply an effect of learning a language? Evidence from second language acquisition -- 8.5 Toward a biolinguistics in the growth of language: Behavioral Genetics and Specific Language Impairment -- 8.5.1 Is UCC the only property that matures or matures away in SLI? A brief detour from finiteness -- 8.5.2 Back to the heritability of the loss of UCC -- 8.6 Genetics -- 8.7 Physiology (neural computations): Possible for OI stage? -- 8.8 Some genetic questions to research -- 8.9 The state of biolinguistics in the growth of language -- 9 Parameters in language acquisition -- 9.1 What a parameter is (or is meant to be), and what it's for -- 9.2 How do we tell what counts as a parameter? -- 9.3 Using parameters to learn -- 9.3.1 Light switches or light dimmers? -- 9.3.2 Batch learning or incremental learning? -- 9.3.3 Parameters: Ensembles or individuals? -- 9.3.4 Getting the most out of your data? -- 9.3.5 Who goes first? -- 9.3.6 Insufficient data: Does not compute? -- 9.4 Specific examples of learning with parameters -- 9.5 Conclusion -- 10 Bilingualism beyond language: On the impact of bilingualism on executive control -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The impact of bilingualism on executive control: Introduction to the phenomenon -- 10.3 Impact of bilingualism on executive control: A brief review -- 10.4 Impact of bilingualism on conflict processing: The facts -- 10.5 Impact of bilingualism on conflict processing: The explanation
10.6 On the effects of bilingualism through development -- 10.7 Summary -- 10.8 Future directions -- Part II Mind, brain, behavior -- 11 The role of experimental syntax in an integrated cognitive science of language -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 The goals and obstacles of generative syntactic theory -- 11.3 To what extent are the acceptability judgments underlying syntactic theory sound? -- 11.3.1 Criticisms of the reliability of syntactic data -- 11.3.2 The reliability of textbook data -- 11.3.3 The reliability of journal data -- 11.3.4 A comparison of the statistical power of traditional methods and formal experiments -- 11.3.5 Cognitive bias -- 11.3.6 The interpretation of variation across participants -- 11.3.7 The relative costs and benefits of traditional methods and formal experiments -- 11.4 What types of inferences are licensed by the linking hypothesis between acceptability judgments and syntactic theory? -- 11.4.1 Reductionist approaches to acceptability judgment effects -- 11.4.2 Gradient acceptability and the nature of syntactic theory -- 11.5 Conclusion -- 12 Working memory and language processing: Theory, data, and directions for future research -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 The focus of attention in memory and language -- 12.2.1 Background -- 12.2.2 Measuring processing speed -- 12.2.3 Diagnosing information in focal attention -- 12.2.4 Language and focal attention -- 12.3 Retrieving information outside the focus of attention -- 12.4 Interference -- 12.5 Conclusions -- 13 Computational primitives in phonology and their neural correlates -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Background -- 13.3 Representational primitives -- 13.4 Where to look for phonological primitives -- 13.5 How to look for phonological primitives -- 13.5.1 Vowels -- 13.5.2 Consonants -- 13.5.3 Underspecification -- 13.6 Phonotopy -- 13.7 Phonological processes
13.8 Conclusions -- Appendix: Cognitive neuroscience methodologies -- A.1 Aphasias and patient-work -- Overview -- Practical issues -- A.2 Electroencephalography (EEG) -- Overview -- Practical issues -- A.3 Magnetoencephalography (MEG) -- Overview -- Practical issues -- A.4 Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) -- Overview -- Practical issues -- A.5 Alternative methods -- 14 Computational primitives in syntax and possible brain correlates -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Combining elements -- 14.2.1 Possible neural correlates of Merge -- 14.2.2 A neuroanatomical distinction between external and internal Merge (Move)? Evidence from the domain of word order permutations -- 14.2.3 Unification: establishing syntactic representations via structure sharing and feature matching -- 14.3 Establishing long-distance dependencies -- 14.4 Sequencing revisited: Consequences for lIFG function -- 14.4.1 A gradient of sequence processing within lIFG -- 14.4.2 Broader implications: Sequencing and a hierarchy of cognitive control signals -- 14.4.3 The lIFG as an evaluative component -- 14.5 Syntactic primitives and the brain? Consequences and perspectives -- 15 Computational primitives in morphology and possible brain correlates -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Are there computational primitives in morphology? -- 15.2.1 Priming studies -- 15.2.2 Morphological decomposition -- 15.2.3 Frequency effects -- 15.3 Classic oppositions in morphology and their neurobiological (im)plausibility -- 15.3.1 Processing regular vs. irregular morphology: The past-tense debate and beyond -- 15.3.2 Inflection vs. derivation -- 15.4 Morphology as a relational information type -- 15.4.1 Neural correlates of morphological processing differ from those related to combinatorial structure
15.4.2 Fine-grained distinctions in the neural correlates of morphological processing and their functional underpinnings -- 15.5 Summary and conclusions -- 16 Grounding the cognitive neuroscience of semantics in linguistic theory -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Semantic composition: Defining the core operations -- 16.2.1 Function application -- 16.2.2 Predicate modification -- 16.3 Semantic representations vs. their plausibility given world knowledge -- 16.4 The challenge of compositionality -- 16.5 The Anterior Midline Field (AMF) as a correlate of semantic composition -- 16.5.1 Varying semantic composition: Semantic mismatch -- 16.5.2 Simple composition: Bringing in syntax and the left ATL -- 16.5.3 Challenges and open questions -- 16.5.3.1 Relation to hemodynamic and neuropsychological data -- 16.5.3.2 Domain-generality -- 16.6 Looking ahead -- 17 Modularity and descent-with-modification -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.1.1 Challenges to sui generis modularity -- 17.1.2 Descent-with-modification modularity -- 17.2 Biological considerations -- 17.3 Language as case study -- 17.3.1 Language and cognitive processes -- 17.3.1.1 Language and memory -- 17.3.1.2 Automatization -- 17.3.1.3 Language and sequencing -- 17.3.1.4 Representational underpinnings -- 17.3.1.5 Representations of space and time -- 17.3.1.6 Representations of words -- 17.3.2 Language and its biological substrates -- 17.3.2.1 The neural substrates of language -- 17.3.2.2 Comorbidity between language and cognition in developmental disorders -- 17.3.3 Summary -- 17.4 Modules as the product of descent-with-modification: Implications -- 17.4.1 Implications for how we identify modular structure -- 17.4.2 Implications for the study of linguistics -- 17.5 Afterword -- 18 The role of Broca's area in language function -- 18.1 Where is Broca's area? -- 18.2 Broca's area and speech articulation
18.3 Broca's area and syntactic computation
The most comprehensive state-of-the-field survey of biolinguistics available
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Boeckx, Cedric The Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics New York : Cambridge University Press,c2013 9780521761536
Subject Biolinguistics.;Neurolinguistics.;Language and languages -- Origin
Electronic books
Alt Author Grohmann, Kleanthes K
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