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Author Williams, Tony D
Title Physiological Adaptations for Breeding in Birds
Imprint Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2012
©2012
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (295 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Illustrations -- Abbreviations -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Structure of the chapters -- 1.2. A primer on reproduction in female birds -- 1.3. Individual variation -- 1.4. What is not in this book? -- 1.5. Avian reproduction in a changing world -- Chapter 2. The Hormonal and Physiological Control of Egg Production -- 2.1. Overview of the female reproductive system -- 2.1.1. Pre-vitellogenic follicle development -- 2.1.2. Rapid follicle growth (RFG) or rapid yolk development (RYD) -- 2.1.3. Vitellogenesis and lipoprotein metabolism -- 2.1.4. Mechanisms of receptor-mediated yolk uptake -- 2.2. Oviduct structure and function -- 2.3. Regulation of the timing of egg-laying (oviposition) -- 2.3.1. Follicle atresia and laying skips -- 2.4. Hormonal control of ovarian and oviduct function -- 2.4.1. The ovary -- 2.4.2. The oviduct -- 2.5. Hypothalamic and pituitary regulation of gonadal function -- 2.6. Hormonal integration of environmental information -- 2.6.1. Photoperiodic control of gonadal function -- 2.6.2. Supplemental, non-photoperiodic cues and ovarian function -- 2.7. Future research questions -- Chapter 3. Timing of Breeding -- 3.1. Early-season events are critical in determining timing of breeding -- 3.2. Fitness consequences of timing decisions -- 3.3. Selection on timing of breeding -- 3.4. Constraint, individual optimization, and the search for mechanism -- 3.5. Sex-specific response mechanisms for timing of breeding -- 3.6. Physiological mechanisms associated with photoperiod (day length) as a proximate factor -- 3.6.1. Individual variation in photoperiodic response -- 3.6.2. Where would sex-specific photoperiodic response mechanisms reside? -- 3.7. Physiological mechanisms associated with temperature as a proximate factor
3.7.1. Temperature as a long-term "information" cue -- 3.7.2. Correlates of temperature as information cues -- 3.7.3. Possible "direct" effects of temperature on timing -- 3.7.4. Where would temperature response mechanisms reside? -- 3.8. Physiological mechanisms associated with food availability as a "proximate" factor -- 3.8.1. Argument 1: Food availability is a constraint because supplemental food advances the timing of laying -- 3.8.2. Argument 2: Food availability must be a constraint because egg production is energetically expensive -- 3.8.3. Argument 3: Food availability is a constraint because pre-breeding "body condition" determines laying date -- 3.8.4. Where would food (resource) response mechanisms reside? -- 3.9. Conclusion -- 3.10. Future research questions -- Chapter 4. Egg Size and Egg Quality -- 4.1. Individual variation in egg size -- 4.2. Fitness consequences of variation in egg size -- 4.2.1. Egg-size-clutch-size trade-offs and fecundity costs of large egg size -- 4.3. Selection on egg size -- 4.4. Variation in egg composition or egg quality -- 4.4.1. Egg macronutrient composition -- 4.4.2. Yolk hormones -- 4.4.3. Egg immunoglobulins and antimicrobial proteins -- 4.4.4. Egg antioxidants -- 4.5. Physiological mechanisms underlying individual variation in egg size and egg quality -- 4.5.1. Mechanisms regulating egg size and egg-size-dependent egg quality -- 4.5.2. Mechanisms underlying egg-size-independent variation in egg quality -- 4.6. Variation in the primary sex ratio and sex-specific follicle development -- 4.7. Extreme flexibility in reproductive investment: The house finch -- 4.8. Conclusions -- 4.9. Future research questions -- Chapter 5. Clutch Size -- 5.1. Individual variation in clutch size and clutch number -- 5.2. Why does clutch size vary among individuals?
5.2.1. Chick-rearing ability and individual optimization of clutch size -- 5.2.2. Nest predation and clutch size -- 5.2.3. Embryo viability, incubation capacity, and clutch size -- 5.2.4. Constraints on egg production -- 5.3. Selection on clutch size -- 5.4. Physiological mechanisms of clutch-size determination -- 5.4.1. Determinate versus indeterminate laying -- 5.4.2. A general mechanistic model for control of clutch size in birds -- 5.4.3. Potential mechanisms for individual and date-independent variation in clutch size -- 5.4.5. Proximate constraints on clutch size: food availability and nutrient reserves -- 5.5. Conclusion -- 5.6. Future research questions -- Chapter 6. Parental Care: Incubation and Chick-Rearing -- 6.1. Comparative aspects of variation in parental care -- 6.2. Individual variation in parental care -- 6.2.1. Incubation -- 6.2.2. Chick-rearing -- 6.3. Fitness consequences of individual variation in parental care -- 6.3.1. Incubation effort, constancy, and duration -- 6.3.2. Short-term effects of incubation effort -- 6.3.3. Long-term effects of incubation effort -- 6.3.4. Chick-rearing, provisioning effort, and nestling productivity -- 6.3.5. Short-term effects of variation in chick-rearing effort -- 6.3.6. Long-term effects of variation in chick-rearing effort -- 6.4. Physiological mechanisms underlying individual variation in parental care -- 6.4.1. Energetic costs of incubation -- 6.4.2. Energetic demands of chick-rearing -- 6.4.3. Nutritional demands of incubation and chick-rearing -- 6.4.4. Are there resource-allocation trade-offs during parental care? -- 6.5. Hormonal mechanisms underlying individual variation in parental care -- 6.5.1. Prolactin and parental care -- 6.5.2. Prolactin and individual variation in parental care -- 6.5.3. Corticosterone and breeding failure
6.5.4. Corticosterone and individual variation in parental care -- 6.6. Conclusions -- 6.7. Future research questions -- Chapter 7. Trade-Offs and Carry-Over Effects -- 7.1. Carry-over effects between winter, the pre-breeding period, and reproduction -- 7.2. Costs of reproduction -- 7.3. Carry-over effects between reproduction and post-breeding life stages -- 7.3.1. Post-fledging parental care -- 7.3.2. Breeding-molt overlap -- 7.4. Physiological mechanisms underlying trade-offs and carry-over effects -- 7.5. Resources and resource-allocation mechanisms -- 7.6. Mechanisms arising from direct physiological or hormonal "conflict" between overlapping functions -- 7.7. "Integrated" physiological mechanisms and individual quality -- 7.7.1. Stress, allostasis, and reactive scope -- 7.7.2. Oxidative stress -- 7.7.3. Oxygen-transport systems, hematology, and anemia -- 7.8. Conclusion -- 7.9. Future research questions -- Chapter 8. Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index
Physiological Adaptations for Breeding in Birds is the most current and comprehensive account of research on avian reproduction. It develops two unique themes: the consideration of female avian reproductive physiology and ecology, and an emphasis on individual variation in life-history traits. Tony Williams investigates the physiological, metabolic, energetic, and hormonal mechanisms that underpin individual variation in the key female-specific reproductive traits and the trade-offs between these traits that determine variation in fitness. The core of the book deals with the avian reproductive cycle, from seasonal gonadal development, through egg laying and incubation, to chick rearing. Reproduction is considered in the context of the annual cycle and through an individual's entire life history. The book focuses on timing of breeding, clutch size, egg size and egg quality, and parental care. It also provides a primer on female reproductive physiology and considers trade-offs and carryover effects between reproduction and other life-history stages. In each chapter, Williams describes individual variation in the trait of interest and the evolutionary context for trait variation. He argues that there is only a rudimentary, and in some cases nonexistent, understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underpin individual variation in the major reproductive life-history traits, and that research efforts should refocus on these key unresolved problems by incorporating detailed physiological studies into existing long-term population studies, generating a new synthesis of physiology, ecology, and evolutionary biology
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Williams, Tony D. Physiological Adaptations for Breeding in Birds Princeton : Princeton University Press,c2012 9780691139821
Subject Birds -- Reproduction.;Females.;Birds -- Physiology.;Adaptation (Physiology);Phenotype.;Birds -- Variation.;Birds -- Ecology
Electronic books
Alt Author Williams, Tony D. D
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