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Author Hancil, Sylvie
Title Prosody and Iconicity
Imprint Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (268 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Iconicity in Language and Literature ; v.13
Iconicity in Language and Literature
Note Prosody and Iconicity -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- References -- Prosodic Iconicity and experiential blending -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The semiotic scene: Overt and global communication models -- 2.1 The 'hearer-only perspective' -- 2.2 "Abstract information processing" -- 2.3 A third model of communication? -- 2.4 Prosodies and experience shaping -- 2.4.1 Speech rate, rhythm and tempo -- 2.4.2 Audible spectrum: Frequencies codes? -- 2.4.3 Phonatory posture imitation through formants (proprioceptive formant analyzer) - speech motor imitation -- 3. Conceptual blending framework -- 3.1 Blending -- 3.1.1 Perception -- 3.1.2 Levels specificity -- 3.1.3 Mono- and inter-modal perceptual integration: "Stroop-effect" and ­McGurck-MacDonald effect -- 3.2 Material anchors -- 3.2.1 Speaking and writing -- 3.2.2 More material anchoring for speaking and writing -- 4. Experiential blending -- 4.1 The experiential blending -- 4.2 Levels of experiential blending -- 4.2.1 First level experiential blending -- 4.2.2 Second level experiential blending -- 4.3 Experiential blending and iconic emergence -- 4.3.1 "Experiencing budget" blend -- 4.3.2 "Running-talking" experiential blend -- 5. Conclusion -- 6. Annexes -- References -- Emotional expressions as communicative signals -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Nature of emotion and emotional expressions -- 1.2 An evolutionary perspective -- 1.3 A bio-informational dimensions theory -- 2. Preliminary BID interpretation of existing data -- 2.1 Anger/happiness -- 2.1.1 Preliminary evidence -- 2.2 Fear -- 2.3 Sadness -- 2.4 Disgust -- 3. New data -- 3.1 Experiment 1 -- 3.1.1 Stimuli -- 3.1.2 Subjects and Procedure -- 3.1.3 Results -- Size perception -- Emotion perception -- 3.1.4 Findings of Experiment 1 -- 3.2 Experiment 2 -- 3.2.1 Stimuli -- 3.2.2 Subjects and procedure
3.2.3 Results -- 3.2.4 Findings of Experiment 2 and further implications -- 4. Parallel encoding of emotional and linguistic information -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Peak alignment and surprise reading -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Corpus Analysis (C-ORAL-ROM) -- 2.1 Material -- 2.2 Results -- 3. Production test -- 3.1 Materials -- 3.2 Speakers -- 3.3 Procedures -- 3.4 Analysis -- 3.5 Results -- 4. Perception and evaluation test -- 4.1 Material -- 4.2 Listeners -- 4.3 Procedures -- 4.4 Results -- 5. Discussion -- References -- Emotional McGurk effect and gender difference - a Swedish study -- 1. Background -- 2. Research questions -- 3. Method -- 4. Method of analysis -- 5. Results -- 6. Summary -- 7. Discussion -- 8. Complicating factors in perception experiments -- References -- Beyond the given -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theory and methodology -- 2.1 Prosody defined -- 2.2 The Theory of enunciative operations -- 2.3 What is pertinent, what is not - or less so? -- 3. Pilot corpus -- 3.1 Going beyond "given" as opposed to "new" information -- 3.2 The Diary corpus -- 3.3 The Maps corpus -- 3.4 The initial term in a series -- 3.5 The presentation of an item as a continuous series -- 4. The given and beyond -- 4.1 Unaccented items -- 4.2 The personal pronoun "she" - referent external to the dialogic couple -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Pragmatic functions and the biological codes -- 1. Information structure and intonation -- 2. Pragmatic properties and pragmatic relations -- 3. The prosody of pragmatic relations and properties and the biological codes -- 3.1 Pragmatic relations and the frequency code -- 3.1.1 The prosody of pragmatic relations in EA -- 3.2 Pragmatic properties and the effort code -- 3.2.1 The prosody of pragmatic properties in EA -- Summary -- References
Pitch accent types and the perception of focus in Majorcan Catalan wh-questions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General aims -- 3. Analysis of the Map Task corpus -- 3.1 Aims -- 3.2 Methodology -- 3.3 Results -- 3.4 Discussion -- 4. Perception Experiment I -- 4.1 Aims -- 4.2 Methodology -- 4.3 Results -- 4.4 Discussion -- 5. Perception Experiment II -- 5.1 Aims -- 5.2 Methodology -- 5.3 Results -- 5.4 Discussion -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- UK declarative rises and the frequency code -- 1. Prosody and universals of language -- 2. Declarative rises in Northern UK dialects -- 3. Why should Viking falls go up? -- 4. An informal experiment -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Iconic interpretation of rhythm in speech -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonetic iconicity, a brief state of the art -- 3. Iconicity, rhythm and the construction of meaning in speech -- 4. Iconic rhythm at a global level -- 5. Iconic rhythm at a local level -- 6. Rhythm as a contextualisation cue -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Iconicity of melodic contours in French -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Modality -- 3. Iconicity of modality contours -- 4. Iconicity of modality variations -- 4.1 Imperative contour -- 4.2 Implicative contour -- 4.3 Contour of surprise -- 4.4 Contour of doubt -- 5. Iconicity in macrosyntax -- 5.1 Parentheses -- 5.2 Postfixes -- 5.3 Continuation majeure -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- A study of postural, mimetic and gestural indicators combined with prosodic indicators -- 1. Total communication concept and the oral dimension -- 2. Total communication and SLA -- 3. Total communication and affects -- 4. The perception of attitudes and postural, mimetic and gestural signs -- 5. Gestures -- 6. Communicative gestures -- 7. Prosody and the perception of attitudes -- 8. Attitude perception in PMG and prosody -- 9. The present study -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Method
9.3 Materials -- 9.4 Validation of the stimuli -- 9.5 Procedure -- 10. Data analysis and discussion -- 10.1 Method for analyzing the data -- 10.2 Comparative analysis -- 11. Conclusion -- References -- Appendices -- 1. Data coding -- 2. Bimodal analyses of Sequence 12: Attitude: Anger - "Go on, it's time to say 'No!'» ["Allez il est temps de dire non"] -- Description of postural, mimetic and gestural signs -- Description of prosodic items -- The total segment -- 3. Materials -- The video corpus: -- The acoustic corpus: -- The audiovisual corpus: -- 4. Test gestures and intonation -- Automatic detection of emotion from real-life data -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Real-life data -- 3. Perceptive test on complex emotions -- 3.1 Evaluation Results per subject -- 3.2 Evaluation results per vector -- 4. Features -- 5. Methods. -- 6. Conclusion and perspectives -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Prosody and Phonemes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. IFA corpus -- 3. Feature types -- 4. Classification -- 5. Feature selection -- 6. Experimental results -- 6.1 Frame-based processing -- 6.2 Segment-based processing -- 6.3 Influence of the speaking style by accuracy -- 6.4 Influence of the speaking style by feature selection -- 7. Conclusion and outlook -- 7.1 Discussion of the findings -- 7.2 Future directions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Index
The benefit of prosodic and additional spectral over exclusively cepstral feature information is investigated for the recognition of phonemes in eight different speaking styles reaching from informal to formal. As prosodic information is best analyzed on a supra-segmental level, the whole temporal context of a phoneme is exploited by application of statistical functionals. 521 acoustic features are likewise obtained and evaluated per descriptor and functional by either de-correlating floating search feature evaluation or classification performance: The classifier of choice are Support Vector Machines lately found highly suitable for this task. As database serves the open IFA corpus of 178 k hand-segmented and hand-labeled 47 Dutch phonemes. In the result, a significant gain is observed for segment-based over frame-based processing, and by inclusion of pitch and formant information for the informal styles. Overall, phonemes are recognized at 76.58% accuracy. The analysis of feature influence provides useful insight for artificial speech production in the considered speaking styles
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Hancil, Sylvie Prosody and Iconicity Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2013 9789027243492
Subject Business -- Data processing -- Congresses.;Management information systems -- Congresses
Electronic books
Alt Author Hirst, Daniel
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