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Author Meriluoto, Jussi
Title Handbook of Cyanobacterial Monitoring and Cyanotoxin Analysis
Imprint New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2017
©2016
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (579 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of Contributors -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Section I Introduction -- Chapter 1 Introduction: Cyanobacteria, Cyanotoxins, Their Human Impact, and Risk Management -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Cyanotoxins -- 1.3 Exposure Routes, Exposure Media, and At-isk Human Activities -- 1.4 Cyanobacterial Blooms and Cyanotoxins in Relation to Human Pressures on Water Resources and Climate Change -- 1.5 Aims of the Handbook -- References -- Section II Cyanobacteria -- Chapter 2 Ecology of Cyanobacteria -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Environmental Conditions Leading to Cyanobacterial Blooms -- 2.2.1 What Species for Which Types of Environments? -- 2.3 Population Dynamics of Cyanobacteria -- 2.3.1 How Is a Bloom Defined? -- 2.3.2 Seasonality in the Dynamics of Cyanobacterial Populations -- 2.4 Spatial Distribution of Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Ecosystems -- 2.5 Ecology of the Production of Toxins by Cyanobacteria -- 2.6 General Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3 Picocyanobacteria: The Smallest Cell-Size Cyanobacteria -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.1.1 General Characteristics of Picocyanobacteria -- 3.1.2 Detection and Identification -- 3.1.3 Phylogenetic Position -- 3.1.4 Occurrence in Freshwater and Marine Environments -- 3.1.5 Ecological Role of Picocyanobacteria -- 3.2 Records of Toxic Picocyanobacteria -- 3.2.1 Occurrence of Microcystins in Picocyanobacteria -- 3.2.2 Other Bioactive Compounds in Picocyanobacteria -- 3.3 Summary -- References -- Chapter 4 Expansion of Alien and Invasive Cyanobacteria -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Definition of Invasive/Alien Species: Nomenclature Problems -- 4.2.1 Invasive Species Concept in Cyanobacteria -- 4.3 Occurrence of Invasive and Alien Cyanobacteria -- 4.3.1 Examples of the Expansion of Invasive and Alien Cyanobacteria
4.4 Factors Enhancing the Expansion of Alien Cyanobacteria -- 4.4.1 Physiological Factors -- 4.4.2 Environmental Factors -- 4.5 Impact of Cyanobacterial Invasion on Ecosystem -- References -- Section III Sampling, Monitoring and Risk Management -- Chapter 5 Health and Safety During Sampling and in the Laboratory -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Sampling Safety -- 5.3 Laboratory Safety -- 5.4 Cyanotoxin Production and Application -- 5.5 Contamination due to Equipment, Glassware, and Accidents -- References -- Chapter 6 Basic Guide to Detection and Monitoring of Potentially Toxic Cyanobacteria -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Monitoring of Cyanobacteria: Sampling Strategies* -- 6.2.1 Selection of Variables -- 6.2.2 Choice of Sampling Locations in Relation to the Typology of Waterbodies and to Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria -- 6.2.3 Monitoring Frequency -- 6.2.4 Equipment -- 6.2.5 Storage and Transport -- 6.3 Cyanobacterial Identification and Quantification* -- 6.3.1 Taxonomic Classification -- 6.3.2 Identification -- 6.3.3 Population Density Estimation -- 6.3.4 Cyanobacterial Biomass Estimation -- Appendix 6.1 Testing Phytoplankton Distributions: χ2 Test (Pearson Goodness-of-Fit Test) -- References -- Chapter 7 Case Studies of Environmental Sampling, Detection, and Monitoring of Potentially Toxic Cyanobacteria -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Shallow Lakes -- 7.2.1 Variability in Microcystin Concentrations along the River Havel, Germany -- 7.2.2 Cylindrospermopsin in Shallow Lakes in Poland -- 7.2.3 Microcystis aeruginosa and Microcystins in Lake Taskisi, Turkey -- 7.2.4 Natural Swimming Pools - Lakes and Dams in Slovakia -- 7.3 Deep Lakes -- 7.4 Reservoirs -- 7.4.1 The Eutrophic, Microcystis-Dominated Sulejow Reservoir, Poland -- 7.4.2 Species, Morphospecies, and Toxin Variability in Santillana Reservoir, Spain -- 7.5 Rivers -- 7.6 The Baltic Sea
7.7 Waterbodies Used for Drinking Water Production -- 7.7.1 The Vertically Stratified Lake Sapanca, Turkey -- 7.7.2 Wind-Sheltered and Sensitive Lake Borgsjön, Finland -- 7.7.3 Management of Drinking Water in Sulejow, Zegrzynski, and Dobromierz Reservoirs and Pilica River, Poland -- References -- Chapter 8 New Tools for the Monitoring of Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Ecosystems -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Use of Photosynthetic Pigments for the In Situ Quantification of Cyanobacteria and Other Phytoplankton in Water -- 8.3 Integration of Physicochemical and Fluorescence Sensors in Buoys -- 8.4 New Methods for Automatic Cell Counting in Water Samples -- References -- Chapter 9 Remote Sensing of Cyanobacterial Blooms in Inland, Coastal, and Ocean Waters -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Bio-optical Properties of Marine and Inland Waters -- 9.3 Platforms and Sensors -- 9.4 Overview of Approaches -- 9.5 Case Study Examples -- 9.5.1 Mapping Cyanobacteria Blooms Using Airborne Remote Sensing -- 9.5.2 Mapping Cyanobacterial Blooms Using Satellite Remote Sensing -- 9.6 Future Prospects -- References -- Chapter 10 The Italian System for Cyanobacterial Risk Management in Drinking Water Chains -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Risk Assessment of Toxic Cyanobacterial Outbreaks in Water for Human Consumption in Italy -- 10.2.1 Toxic Species and Associated Toxins -- 10.2.2 Water Supply System Vulnerability -- 10.3 Framework of Risk Management of Toxic Cyanobacterial Outbreaks in Water for Human Consumption -- 10.3.1 Risk Management Framework -- 10.3.2 Emergency Response Plans -- 10.4 Risk Information and Communication -- References -- Section IV Toxins and Bioactive/Noxious Compounds from Cyanobacteria -- Chapter 11 Microcystins and Nodularins -- 11.1 Chemical Characteristics and Diversity of Microcystins and Nodularins -- 11.2 Biosynthesis and Genetics of MC and NOD Production
11.3 Occurrence of MCs and NODs -- 11.4 Toxicological Effects and Associated Health Risk -- 11.4.1 Mechanisms of toxicity -- 11.4.2 Exposure Routes -- 11.4.3 Tolerable Daily Intake Guidelines -- 11.4.4 Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems -- 11.5 Available Methods for the Analysis of MCs and NODs -- References -- Chapter 12 Cylindrospermopsin and Congeners -- 12.1 Chemical Characteristics of Cylindrospermopsin and Congeners -- 12.2 Genes Involved in CYN Biosynthesis -- 12.3 CYN Producers and Distribution -- 12.4 Toxicity of CYN -- 12.4.1 Mechanism of Toxicity -- 12.4.2 Human Intoxication -- 12.4.3 Effects on Animals and Ecosystems -- 12.5 The Biological Role of CYN -- 12.6 Degradation of CYN -- 12.7 Available Methods for Determining CYN in Waters -- References -- Chapter 13 Anatoxin-a, Homoanatoxin-a, and Natural Analogues -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Chemical Structure, Synthesis, and Reactivity -- 13.3 Biosynthesis of ANTX, HANTX, and dihydroANTX -- 13.4 Occurrence and Producing Strains -- 13.5 Toxicity and Pharmacology -- 13.5.1 Mechanism of Toxicity -- 13.5.2 Animal Poisonings -- 13.6 Analytical Methodologies -- 13.6.1 Available Methods for Determination and Quantification -- 13.6.2 Methods for the Detection and Quantitation of AN -- References -- Chapter 14 Saxitoxin and Analogues -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Toxicity of STXs -- 14.3 Occurrence -- 14.4 Genetics and Biosynthesis -- 14.5 Detection Methods -- 14.6 Guidance Values or National Regulations or Recommendations for Managing STXs -- References -- Chapter 15 Anatoxin-a(S) -- 15.1 Chemical Structure of Anatoxin-a(S) -- 15.2 Biosynthesis -- 15.3 Occurrence and Producing Strains -- 15.4 Toxicology and Pharmacology -- 15.4.1 Mechanism of Toxicity -- 15.4.2 Animal Poisonings -- 15.5 Analytical Methods for Determination and Quantification -- References
Chapter 16 β-N-Methylamino-l-Alanine and (S)-2,4-Diaminobutyric Acid -- 16.1 Historical Overview -- 16.2 Structure, Synthesis, and Molecular Properties -- 16.3 Neurotoxicity -- 16.4 Methods for Identification and Quantification -- 16.5 Occurrence in Cyanobacteria, Plants, and Animals -- References -- Chapter 17 Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins -- 17.1 Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins: Structure -- 17.2 Occurrence of LPS Endotoxins -- 17.3 Toxic Effects of LPS Endotoxins -- 17.4 Methods for Determination of LPS Endotoxins -- References -- Chapter 18 Cyanobacterial Retinoids -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Detection of Retinoids Produced by Cyanobacteria -- 18.3 Chemistry and Analysis of Retinoids -- 18.4 Malformations by Cyanobacterial Retinoids -- 18.5 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 19 Other Cyanobacterial Bioactive Substances -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Aeruginosins and Spumigins -- 19.3 Anabaenopeptins -- 19.4 Biogenic amines -- 19.5 Depsipeptides -- 19.6 Endocrine Disruptors and Novel Tumour Promoters -- 19.7 Lyngbyatoxins and Other Toxins Produced by Lyngbya majuscula -- 19.8 Microginins -- 19.9 Microviridins -- References -- Chapter 20 Taste and Odour Compounds Produced by Cyanobacteria -- 20.1 Cyanobacterial Taste and Odour Compounds in Water Resources -- 20.2 Analytical Methods for Taste and Odour Compounds -- References -- Section V Screening and Trace Analysis of Cyanotoxins -- Chapter 21 Determination of Cyanotoxins by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array -- 21.1 Introduction: Application of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for Different Classes of Cyanotoxins -- 21.2 HPLC of Microcystins and Nodularins -- 21.3 HPLC of Anatoxins -- 21.4 HPLC of Cylindrospermopsin -- 21.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of HPLC-PDA -- References
Chapter 22 Determination of Cyanotoxins by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Derivatization
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Meriluoto, Jussi Handbook of Cyanobacterial Monitoring and Cyanotoxin Analysis New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2017 9781119068686
Subject Cyanobacteria--Health aspects
Electronic books
Alt Author Spoof, Lisa
Codd, Geoffrey A
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