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Author Thomas, Craig
Title The Semantic Representation of Natural Language
Imprint London : Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2014
©2012
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (232 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Bloomsbury Studies in Theoretical Linguistics Ser
Bloomsbury Studies in Theoretical Linguistics Ser
Note Intro -- Title page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Preface -- Typographical Conventions -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 What we are trying to do -- 1.2 The jewel in the crown -- 1.3 How to read this book -- 2 Basic Concepts -- 2.1 Semasiological and onomasiological perspectives -- 2.2 Meaning and reference -- 2.3 Describing or creating reality -- 2.4 The functions of language -- 2.5 Semantic units and semantic relations -- 2.6 Language, knowledge and perspective -- 2.7 Anthropomorphism, minimalism and practicality -- 2.8 Desiderata -- 3 Previous Approaches -- 3.1 Lexical semantics -- 3.2 Conceptual structures -- 3.3 Lexical relations and inheritance networks -- 3.4 The generative lexicon -- 3.5 Case grammar -- 3.6 Conceptual Dependency -- 3.7 Semantic networks -- 3.8 Systemic grammar -- 3.9 Truth-functional perspectives -- 3.10 Computational tools for semantic analysis -- 3.11 Models of text structure -- 3.12 Narrative structure and narrative prose generation -- 3.13 Knowledge representation and ontologies -- 3.14 Models of reasoning: ACT* and ACT-R -- 3.15 In sum -- 4 Semantic Expressions: Introduction -- 4.1 Background -- 4.2 Some caveats -- 4.3 Basic expressions -- 4.4 Semantic types -- 4.5 Semantic functions -- 4.6 The constant UNSPEC -- 4.7 Adjustments -- 4.8 Qualifiers -- 4.9 Relative qualifiers -- 4.10 Restriction versus description -- 4.11 Lists -- 4.12 Circumstances -- 4.13 Modifying completions -- 4.14 Adjustments versus functions -- 4.15 Modifying completions versus modifying actions -- 4.16 Combining completions -- 4.17 Representing semantics, not syntax -- 5 Formal Issues -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Properties of SEs -- 5.3 Semantic tree -- 5.4 The semantic lexicon -- 6 Semantic Expressions: Basic Features -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Generalized quantifiers -- 6.3 Count and mass entities
6.4 Quantifier granularity -- 6.5 Negatives -- 6.6 Only -- 6.7 Numbers -- 6.8 On the granularity of snow -- 6.9 Nobody and everybody -- 6.10 Sets and set-difference -- 6.11 Interrogatives -- 6.12 Tense, aspect and modal verbs -- 6.13 Sequencing -- 6.14 Timestamps -- 6.15 Specific and non-specific entities -- 7 Advanced Features -- 7.1 Co-referential relations -- 7.2 Entity constants -- 7.3 Other constants -- 7.4 Scope of definition -- 7.5 Lists -- 7.6 Connectives -- 7.7 Associativity and commutativity -- 7.8 Propagation of adjustments -- 7.9 Other programming features -- 7.10 Functional programming -- 7.11 Duelling quantifiers -- 7.12 Two-dimensional quantifiers -- 7.13 Arrays -- 7.14 Football fans -- 7.15 only Revisited -- 7.16 Mass entities -- 7.17 Speakers, listeners and speech -- 7.18 Vale, Caesar -- 8 Applications: Capture -- 8.1 What to represent? -- 8.2 Adventure -- 8.3 A guided tour -- 8.4 Instruction manual or recipe book -- 8.5 Topoi -- 9 Three Little Pigs -- 9.1 Preliminaries -- 9.2 The story -- 9.3 Alternative segment for bad_encounter -- 9.4 Length issues -- 10 Applications: Creation -- 10.1 A hole in three -- 10.2 A Proppian fairy tale -- 10.3 Variant stories -- 10.4 Romeo and Juliet -- 10.5 In sum -- Bibliography -- Index
This volume contains a detailed, precise and clear semantic formalism designed to allow non-programmers such as linguists and literary specialists to represent elements of meaning which they must deal with in their research and teaching. At the same time, by its basis in a functional programming paradigm, it retains sufficient formal precision to support computational implementation. The formalism is designed to represent meaning as found at a variety of levels, including basic semantic units and relations, word meaning, sentence-level phenomena, and text-level meaning. By drawing on fundamental principles of program design, the proposed formalism is both easy to read and modify yet sufficiently powerful to allow for the representation of complex semantic phenomena. In this monograph, the authors introduce the formalism and show its basic structure, apply it to the analysis of the semantics of a variety of linguistic phenomena in both English and French, and use it to represent the semantics of a variety of texts ranging from single sentences, to textual excepts, to a full story
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Thomas, Craig The Semantic Representation of Natural Language London : Bloomsbury Publishing Plc,c2014 9781472576569
Subject Computational linguistics.;Knowledge representation (Information theory);Natural language processing (Computer science);Semantics -- Data processing
Electronic books
Alt Author Levison, Michael
Lessard, Greg
Donald, Matthew
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