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100 1  Jindra, Ines W 
245 12 A New Model of Religious Conversion :|bBeyond Network 
       Theory and Social Constructivism 
250    1st ed 
264  1 Leiden :|bBRILL,|c2014 
264  4 |c©2014 
300    1 online resource (238 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  Religion in the Americas Ser. ;|vv.14 
505 0  Intro -- A New Model of Religious Conversion -- Copyright 
       -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1. 
       Conversions in Context: On the Interaction between the 
       Personal and the Social -- Goals and Argument of the Book 
       -- Religious Experience and Religious Conversion -- 
       Religious Experience -- Religious Conversion -- Outline of
       the Book -- Methodology -- 2. Case Studies, the Key 
       Concept and Converts' Background Experiences -- Selected 
       Case Studies -- Introducing the Inductive, Comparative 
       Model: The Key Concept and Background Experiences -- 
       Shared Background Experiences -- Problems with Fathers and
       /or Mothers -- Short-Term Crises Prior to Conversion -- 
       Key Concept - Contrasting Background Experiences -- The 
       Experience of "Openness" or Disorganization (Category 1) -
       - Religious Meaninglessness -- Cultural, Social and/or 
       Familial Disorganization -- Problems in the Area of 
       Relationships and Self -- The Experience of Closed, Too 
       Structured Backgrounds (Category 2) -- Too Much Religious 
       Structure -- Too Much Cultural Structure -- Feeling at 
       Home in One's Milieu of Origin (Category 3) -- Attractions
       of Religious Groups in Light of Background Experiences -- 
       Conversions in Reaction to "Disorganization" (Category 1) 
       -- Converts to the Jehovah's Witnesses: Religious 
       Meaninglessness and Familial Disorganization -- Converts 
       to Islam and the Jehovah's Witnesses: Cultural, Social and
       /or Familial Disorganization -- Converts to Christianity: 
       Problems in the Area of Relationships and Self -- 
       Conversions in Reaction to Closed, Too Structured 
       Backgrounds (Category 2) -- Unitarian Universalists, One 
       Buddhist: Too Much Religious Structure -- Converts to the 
       Baha'i: Too Much Cultural Structure -- Feeling at Home in 
       One's Milieu of Origin (Category 3) -- Converts to Various
       Christian Denominations, to the Baha'i and to Islam: 
       Feeling at Home in One's Milieu of Origin 
505 8  Conclusion -- Comparison with Henri Gooren's "Conversion 
       Career Approach" -- Making Sense of Background Patterns in
       Light of Theories of Social Change -- 3. Network Influence,
       Strong Social Constructivism and the Backgrounds of 
       Conversion -- Network Theory and Strong Social 
       Constructivism: Explaining Why People Convert -- The 
       Failure of Network Theory and Strong Social Constructivism
       in Explaining Why People Convert -- Why the Difference in 
       Network Influence and Account Giving/Biographical 
       Reconstruction? -- The Overall Pattern -- Cases for Which 
       the Dominant Paradigms Fit -- Cases for Which the Dominant
       Paradigms Do Not Fit -- Summary of Associations -- 
       Mechanisms -- 4. Altering a (Problematic) Trajectory, 
       Religious Content, and Conversion -- Altering One's 
       (Problematic) Trajectory -- Case Stories That Fit the 
       Dominant Paradigms -- The Role of Network Influence in 
       Altering One's (Problematic) Trajectory: Converts to the 
       Jehovah's Witnesses and to Islam -- The Role of Network 
       Influence, Positive Background Experiences, and Religious 
       Emotions, Cognitions, and Beliefs: Adopting the Religion 
       One Grew Up with -- Case Stories That Do Not Fit the 
       Dominant Paradigms -- The Role of Religious Emotions, 
       Cognitions, and Beliefs -- The Role of Religious Emotions,
       Cognitions, and Beliefs: Converts to Islam and to 
       Christianity -- The Role of Increased Self-Reflexivity and
       Life Course Agency Due to Religious Emotions, Cognitions 
       and Beliefs: Converts to Christianity -- The Role of 
       Contradictory Aims and the Inability of Religious Emotions,
       Cognitions, and Beliefs to Address Them: Converts to 
       Christianity and the Baha'i -- The Role of Existing Self-
       Reflexivity and Life Course Agency: Converts to the Baha'i
       and Unitarian Universalists -- Conclusion -- 5. Gender and
       Conversion -- Gender-Related Experiences and Conversion --
       Two Case Studies 
505 8  Comparing the Case Stories -- The Overall Picture -- The 
       Dominant Paradigms and Gendered Dimensions of Conversion -
       - 6. Conclusion -- Implications for Research on Conversion
       -- The "Multilevel Interdisciplinary Paradigm" and the 
       "Conversion Career Approach" -- On the Role of Religious 
       Emotions, Cognitions, and Beliefs -- On Gender -- On 
       Network Theory -- On Strong and Weak Social Constructivism
       -- Implications for Interfaith Dialogue -- Why 
       Biographical Sociology Matters -- Appendix. Methodology --
       A Critical Realist Framework -- The Narrative Interview --
       Schütze's Theory of Narration -- The Analysis of the 
       Narrative Interview -- Grounded Theory -- Coding and 
       Sampling Strategies in Grounded Theory Research -- 
       Religious Groups and Participants -- Participants and 
       Sampling -- The Religious Groups -- Christianity/Christian
       Groups -- Jehovah's Witnesses -- Islam/Muslim Groups -- 
       Baha'i -- Unitarian Universalism -- Methodological 
       Limitations -- Bibliography -- Index 
520    A New Model of Religious Conversion highlights connections
       between converts' backgrounds and the religions they 
       convert to. It also critiques the prevalent application of
       network theory and social constructivism to the study of 
       conversion narratives, while making the case for the 
       introduction of biographical sociology to American 
       sociology 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Conversion.;Conversion -- Case studies.;Conversion -- 
       Psychology 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aJindra, Ines W.|tA New Model of 
       Religious Conversion : Beyond Network Theory and Social 
       Constructivism|dLeiden : BRILL,c2014|z9789004264984 
830  0 Religion in the Americas Ser 
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