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Author Stolz, Thomas
Title The Crosslinguistics of Zero-Marking of Spatial Relations
Imprint Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2014
©2014
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (421 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Studia Typologica Ser. ; v.15
Studia Typologica Ser
Note Intro -- Table of contents -- Preface and acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Part A: Introduction and theoretical framework -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Appetizer -- 1.2 First examples (of methodology and terminology) -- 1.3 Organization -- 2 Foundations -- 2.1 Generalities -- 2.2 Previous studies -- 2.3 (An excursus on) Asymmetries -- 2.3.1 Syncretism -- 2.3.2 More or less complex -- 2.3.3 Markedness - a difficult concept -- 2.4 On zeroes and related issues -- 2.4.1 Finding zeroes -- 2.4.2 Types of zeroes -- 2.4.2.1 Splits -- 2.4.2.2 Problematic toponyms -- 2.4.3 General case-drop - a false friend -- 2.5 Theoretical and methodological issues for future research -- 2.5.1 The development of zero-markers -- 2.5.2 A formal framework: Optimality Theory -- 2.6 The final touches -- Part B: The empirical side of zero-marking of spatial relations -- 3 Cross-linguistic objets trouvés -- 3.1 Indo-European -- 3.1.1 Hittite and sundry old Indo-European languages -- 3.1.2 (Insular) North Germanic -- 3.1.2.1 Icelandic -- 3.1.2.2 Faroese -- 3.1.2.3 Mainland Scandinavian -- 3.1.3 Aromunian -- 3.1.4 Southern Macedonian -- 3.1.5 Armenian -- 3.1.5.1 East Armenian -- 3.1.5.2 West Armenian -- 3.1.6 Indo-Iranian -- 3.1.6.1 Kurmancî and Zazakî -- 3.1.6.2 Gilaki -- 3.1.6.3 Sivandi -- 3.1.6.4 Sangesari -- 3.1.6.5 Persian -- 3.1.6.6 Kashmiri -- 3.1.6.7 Punjabi -- 3.1.6.8 Gujarati -- 3.1.6.9 Nepali -- 3.1.6.10 Hindi -- 3.2 Afro-Asiatic -- 3.2.1 Semitic -- 3.2.1.1 East Aramaic -- 3.2.1.2 Neo-Arabic -- 3.2.1.2.1 Cairene Arabic -- 3.2.1.2.2 Sudanese Arabic -- 3.2.1.2.3 Moroccan Arabic -- 3.2.1.2.4 Nigerian Arabic -- 3.2.1.2.5 Cypriot Arabic -- 3.2.2 Cushitic -- 3.2.2.1 Somali -- 3.2.2.2 Dahalo -- 3.3 Chadic -- 3.3.1 Miya -- 3.3.2 Kera -- 3.3.3 Pero -- 3.3.4 Mupun -- 3.3.5 Hausa -- 3.4 Nilo-Saharan -- 3.4.1 Lango -- 3.4.2 Maa -- 3.5 Fula -- 3.6 Vai -- 3.7 Igbo -- 3.8 Bantu
3.8.1 Yeyi -- 3.8.2 Kinyamwezi -- 3.9 Non-Indo-European languages in Asia -- 3.9.1 Bezhta -- 3.9.2 Burushaski -- 3.9.3 Malayalam -- 3.9.4 Kharia -- 3.9.5 Khmer -- 3.9.6 Hmong -- 3.10 Austronesian -- 3.10.1 Urak Lawoi' -- 3.10.2 Malay -- 3.10.3 Kilivila -- 3.10.4 Longgu -- 3.10.5 Mono-Alu -- 3.10.6 Drehu -- 3.10.7 Nêlêmwa -- 3.10.8 Xârâcùu -- 3.11 Papua-Newguinea -- 3.11.1 Koiari -- 3.11.2 Kobon -- 3.11.3 Bukiyip -- 3.11.4 Yelî Dnye -- 3.12 Australia -- 3.12.1 Guugu Yimidhirr -- 3.12.2 Ngalakan -- 3.12.3 Jaminjung -- 3.13 The Americas -- 3.13.1 Inside (and on the borders of) the Mesoamerican Sprachbund -- 3.13.2 Zero-marking of Place and/or Goal in individual Mesoamerican languages -- 3.13.2.1 Zapoteco of the Isthmus (Oaxaca) -- 3.13.2.2 Tlapaneco of Malinaltepec (Guerrero) -- 3.13.2.3 Trique of San Juan Copala (Oaxaca) -- 3.13.2.4 Huichol of San Andrés Cohamiata (Jalisco) -- 3.13.2.5 Chinanteco of San Juan de Lealao (Oaxaca) -- 3.13.2.6 Zoque of Chimalapa (Oaxaca) -- 3.13.2.7 Huave of San Mateo del Mar (Oaxaca) -- 3.13.2.8 Náhuatl of Acaxochitlán (Hidalgo) -- 3.13.2.9 Yucateco of X-Hazil Sur (Quintana Roo) -- 3.13.2.10 Totonaco of Misantla (Veracruz) -- 3.13.2.11 Matlatzinca of San Francisco Oxtotilpan (Estado de México) -- 3.13.2.12 Mexicanero of la Sierra Madre Oriental -- 3.13.2.13 Guarijío of Arechuyvo (Chihuahua) -- 3.13.2.14 Seri of Sonora -- 3.13.2.15 Interlude -- 3.13.3 Further data from Mayan languages -- 3.13.3.1 Jacaltec -- 3.13.3.2 Kanjobal -- 3.13.3.3 Tojolabal -- 3.13.3.4 Mam -- 3.13.3.5 Itzá -- 3.14 Pidgin and Creole languages -- 3.14.1 Portuguese-based Creoles -- 3.14.1.1 Angolar -- 3.14.1.2 São Tomense -- 3.14.1.3 Principense -- 3.14.1.4 Fa d'Ambû -- 3.14.1.5 Creole of Batavia and Tugu -- 3.14.1.6 Papia Kristang -- 3.14.2 Spanish-based Creoles -- 3.14.2.1 Papiamentu -- 3.14.2.2 Palenquero -- 3.14.3 French-based Creoles
3.14.3.1 Haitian -- 3.14.3.2 Guyanais -- 3.14.3.3 Seselwa -- 3.14.4 Dutch-based Creoles -- 3.14.5 English-based Pidgins and Creoles -- 3.14.5.1 Pidgins -- 3.14.5.1.1 Nigerian Pidgin English -- 3.14.5.1.2 Japanese Pidgin English in Hawaii -- 3.14.5.1.3 Pidgin English in Nauru -- 3.14.5.2 Central American Creole English -- 3.14.6 On zero-marking in Pidgins and Creoles - in general -- 3.15 Esperanto -- 3.16 Bridge -- 4 Case studies -- 4.1 Zero-marking in contemporary literary French -- 4.1.1 Background -- 4.1.2 Something is absent -- 4.1.3 Privileged street names -- 4.1.4 Supposed counter-examples -- 4.1.5 Predicates -- 4.1.5.1 Verbs combining with Goals -- 4.1.5.2 Verbs combining with Places -- 4.1.6 Beyond the VP -- 4.1.6.1 Semantics and pragmatics -- 4.1.6.2 Appositions and related phenomena -- 4.1.6.3 Attributes and secondary predication -- 4.1.7 Verbs of communication -- 4.1.8 Where do you live? -- 4.1.9 Are there preferences for being zero-marked? -- 4.1.9.1 More data -- 4.1.9.2 Quantitative aspects -- 4.2 Zero-marking in contemporary literary Maltese -- 4.2.1 In medias res -- 4.2.2 On Maltese spatial prepositions -- 4.2.3 Where spatial prepositions fail to show up -- 4.2.4 Statistics -- 4.2.4.1 The first corpus text (RMT I) -- 4.2.4.1.1 On location-NPs -- 4.2.4.1.2 The verbal component of Maltese spatial constructions -- 4.2.4.2 The second corpus text (EWB) -- 4.2.4.2.1 Some properties of location-NPs -- 4.2.4.2.2 Zero-marking of spatial relations and verbs -- 4.2.4.3 Variation -- 4.2.4.3.1 Constraints on pluralization -- 4.2.4.3.2 Specificity and related issues -- 4.2.4.3.2.1 Definiteness and indefiniteness -- 4.2.4.3.2.2 Genericity -- 4.2.4.3.2.3 Demonstratives and location-NPs -- 4.2.4.3.2.4 Possessed location-NPs -- 4.2.4.3.2.5 Location-NPs with (and without) attributes -- 4.2.4.3.3 Individual place names with and without fi 'in, at, on'
4.2.4.3.3.1 Street names -- 4.2.4.3.3.2 Toponyms -- 4.2.4.3.4 Variation with verbs -- 4.2.5 A final word on the Maltese case -- 4.3 French and Maltese - similarities and dissimilarities -- Part C: Insights and outlook -- 5 Evaluation -- 5.1 Goal vs. Place -- 5.2 Toponyms vs. common nouns -- 5.3 Obligatory vs. optional -- 5.4 Interrelations -- 6 The end is near -- 6.1 Achievements (which pose questions) -- 6.2 Zero-marking in the making? -- 6.3 The OT-framework -- 6.4 Syntagmatic vs. paradigmatic types of zero -- 6.5 Complement vs. adverbial -- 6.6 The Goal bias and mode hierarchies -- 6.7 Revisiting the object dimension -- 6.8 A correspondence with noun incorporation -- 6.9 Conclusions -- Appendix -- A: Corpus Rajt Malta tinbidel -- B: Corpus Tout Maigret IV -- C: Corpus Nestor Burma -- D: Corpus L-ewwel weraq tal-bajtar -- E: Sample languages -- F: Maps -- Sources -- References -- Index of authors -- Index of languages -- Index of subjects
On the basis of a world-wide convenience sample of 116 languages, the distribution of zero-marking of spatial relations over the languages of the world is shown to largely escape any genetically, areally and/or typologically based constraints. The main goal of this book is to firmly establish the cross-linguistic occurrence of the zero-marking of spatial relations and to provide a framework for its study in terms of economy and predictability
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Stolz, Thomas The Crosslinguistics of Zero-Marking of Spatial Relations Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc.,c2014 9783050062761
Subject Cross-cultural orientation.;Discourse markers.;Intercultural communication.;Space perception
Electronic books
Alt Author Lestrade, Sander
Stolz, Christel
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