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Author Voeller, John G
Title Detection and Intelligent Systems for Homeland Security
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2014
©2013
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (129 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Title Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 2D-to-3d Face Recognition Systems -- 1.1 Intelligent Video Systems -- 1.1.1 The Need for Intelligent Video Systems -- 1.1.2 The Barrier to Face -- 1.1.3 2D-to-3D Bridges the Performance Gap for Intelligent Video Systems -- 1.2 Computational Anatomy and Diffeomorphisms For 2D-TO-3D Model Generation -- 1.2.1 Computational Anatomy -- 1.2.2 One and Two-View Geometry Generation -- 1.2.3 Statistical Validation of 2D-to-3D Model Generation -- 1.2.4 Root Mean Squared Error on Controlled and Uncontrolled Imagery -- 1.2.5 Rigid Motion Reconstruction Accuracy -- 1.3 The 2D-To-3D Technology for Photometric Representation -- 1.4 2D-To-3D Geometric Model Normalization -- 1.4.1 2D-to-3D Geometric Normalization -- 1.4.2 2D-to-3D Photometric Normalization -- 1.4.3 Boosting Facial Recognition Systems via 2D-to-3D Geometric Model Generation -- 1.5 Pose and Lighting Invariant Facial Recognition Systems Based On 2D-To-3D Geometry Generation -- 1.5.1 2D-to-3D Enabled Frontal Pose-Invariant Facial Recognition Systems -- 1.5.2 Lighting Invariant 2D-to-3D Facial Recognition Systems -- 1.5.3 2D-to-3D Full Profile Identification Systems -- 1.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2 Eye and Iris Sensors -- 2.1 Biometrics for Human Identification -- 2.2 Scientific Overview of Iris Technology -- 2.2.1 Technology Basics -- 2.2.2 Research Review -- 2.3 Challenges in Iris Technology -- 2.3.1 Stringent Iris Acquisition Requirements -- 2.3.2 Standoff Iris Segmentation Challenges -- 2.3.3 Lack of Database Cross Validation -- 2.3.4 Image Quality Requirements and Preprocessing -- 2.4 Future Research Directions -- 2.4.1 Critical Needs Analysis -- 2.4.2 Emerging Technical Approaches -- 2.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3 Craniofacial Aging -- 3.1 Scientific Overview
3.1.1 Craniofacial Aging: Findings in Anthropology and Forensics -- 3.2 Critical Needs Analysis -- 3.2.1 Longitudinal Face Databases -- 3.2.2 Effect of Adult Aging on a Standard Face Recognition Technique -- 3.2.3 Face Recognition Using Synthetic Facial Aging -- 3.3 Research Directions -- References -- Chapter 4 Threat Signatures of Explosive Materials -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Scientific Overview -- 4.2.1 Explosive Terms Defined -- 4.3 Elements That Comprise Explosive Materials -- 4.4 Vapor Pressure of Explosive Materials -- 4.5 Explosives Detection -- 4.5.1 Overview -- 4.5.2 Trace Explosives Detection -- 4.5.3 Explosive Vapor Detection -- 4.5.4 Explosive Particle Detection -- 4.5.5 Taggants -- 4.5.6 Trace Detection Technologies Equipment -- 4.5.7 Canine Detection of Explosives -- 4.5.8 Bulk Detection -- 4.5.9 Electromagnetic Radiation -- 4.5.10 Imaging Technologies -- 4.5.11 Nuclear-Based Technologies -- 4.5.12 Summary and Future Research Directions -- 4.6 Research and Funding Data -- 4.7 Critical Needs Analysis and Research Directions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 5 Radioactive Materials Sensors -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Gamma Ray and Neutron Sensing and Spectroscopy -- 5.3 Radiation Imaging -- 5.4 Active Interrogation -- 5.5 Radiation Detection Materials -- 5.6 System Integration -- 5.7 Closing Remarks -- References -- Chapter 6 Sensing Dispersal of Chemical and Biological Agents in Urban Environments -- 6.1 Rationale for Chemical and Biological Sensors in Urban Environments -- 6.2 Chemical and Biological Detection Architecture -- 6.2.1 Low Consequence Sensor Performance Requirements -- 6.2.2 High Consequence Sensor Performance Requirements -- 6.3 Chemical and Biological Sensor Technical Approach -- 6.3.1 Low Consequence Chemical Sensor Technologies -- 6.3.2 Low Consequence Biological Sensor Technologies
6.3.3 High Consequence Chemical Sensor Technologies -- 6.3.4 High Consequence Biological Sensor Technologies -- 6.4 Future Technology Needs and Improvements -- References -- Chapter 7 Passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Chemical Sensors for Homeland Security Applications -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Background -- 7.3 Threats, Challenges, and New Technical Solutions -- 7.3.1 Threats -- 7.3.1 Threats -- 7.3.2 Challenges in Chemical Sensing of Homeland Security Threats -- 7.3.3 Technical Solution-New Sensor Platform with Multivariable Signal Transduction -- 7.4 Summary and Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Further Reading -- Index
Detection and Intelligent Systems for Homeland Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering advanced technology for image and video interpretation systems used for surveillance, which help in solving such problems as identifying faces from live streaming or stored videos. Biometrics for human identification, including eye retinas and irises, and facial patterns are also presented. The book then provides information on sensors for detection of explosive and radioactive materials and methods for sensing chemical and biological agents in urban environments
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Voeller, John G. Detection and Intelligent Systems for Homeland Security Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2014 9781118787588
Subject Data mining.;Computer security
Electronic books
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