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Author Maguire, Warren
Title Analysing Variation in English
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011
©2011
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (348 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Contributors -- Abbreviations -- Corpora and tools for corpus analysis -- Others -- Introduction. Analysing variation in English: what we know, what we don't, and why it matters -- 1 Investigating variation in English: how do we know what we know? -- 2 Why does it matter? Variation and other fields -- Part I Investigating variation in English: how do we know what we know? -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Dialectology -- 1.3 Sociolinguistics -- 1.3.1 Elicitation techniques of sociolinguistics -- 1.3.2 Transcription of data in sociolinguistics -- 1.3.3 Acoustic methods -- 1.3.4 Data analysis -- 1.4 Issues of special concern -- 1.4.1 Vowel shifting theories -- 1.4.2 Mergers -- 1.4.3 Boundaries between phonemes and goodness tests -- 1.5 Where next? -- 2 How to make intuitions succeed: -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Morphosyntactic variation: a review of methods -- 2.3 Grammaticality judgement tasks: further considerations -- 2.4 Testing comparability between instruments: a pilot study -- 2.4.1 The linguistic phenomena -- (I) Non-standard negation -- (II) Pronominalisation -- (III) Relativisation strategies -- (IV) The Northern Subject Rule -- 2.4.2 The data collection process -- 2.4.3 Data analysis -- 2.5 How to make intuitions succeed -- 2.6 Where next? -- Websites -- 3 Corpora: capturing language in use -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 What is a corpus? -- 3.2.1 Conventional corpora -- 3.2.2 Unconventional (dialect) corpora -- 3.2.3 The time dimension -- 3.2.4 Advantages (and things to think about) -- 3.3 What's out there? -- 3.3.1 Dialect atlases -- 3.3.2 The Oxford Text Archive -- 3.3.3 Text- and speech-based corpora -- 3.3.4 The World Wide Web -- 3.4 Constructing a corpus -- 3.4.1 Representativeness -- 3.4.2 Transcription -- 3.4.3 Annotation -- 3.4.4 Accessibility
3.5 How you use a corpus informs what you find -- 3.6 Summary -- 3.7 Where next? -- Websites -- 4 Hypothesis generation -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Data creation -- 4.2.1 Formulation of a research question -- 4.2.2 Variable selection -- 4.2.3 Variable value assignment -- 4.2.4 Data representation -- 4.3 Data analysis -- 4.3.1 Motivation -- 4.3.2 Vector space -- 4.3.3 Cluster analysis -- 4.3.3.1 Distance in vector space -- 4.3.3.2 Cluster analysis methods -- 4.3.3.3 Hierarchical cluster analysis of the NECTE data -- 4.4 Hypothesis generation -- 4.5 Summary -- 4.6 Where next? -- 5 Quantifying relations between dialects -- 5.1 Why we might want to know how similar or different varieties are to each other -- 5.2 Shared features -- 5.2.1 Isoglosses -- 5.3 Problems with isogloss and feature bundles -- 5.4 Quantifying relations between varieties -- 5.4.1 Categorical approaches -- 5.4.2 Levenshtein distance -- 5.4.3 The 'Sound Comparisons' method -- 5.5 Representing similarities and differences -- 5.6 Validation -- 5.7 Conclusion -- 5.8 Where next? -- 6 Perceptual dialectology -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.1.1 Folk linguistics -- 6.2 Perceptual dialectology: situating the field -- 6.3 Traditional perceptual dialectology -- 6.4 Language attitude studies -- 6.5 The response to language attitude research: contemporary perceptual dialectology -- 6.5.1 Perceptual geography -- 6.5.2 Preston's methodology -- 6.5.3 Perceptual study in the UK -- 6.6 Studying perception in northern England -- 6.6.1 Methods -- 6.6.2 Data processing -- 6.6.3 Findings -- Cultural prominence -- Claiming and denial -- Proximity -- 6.7 Where next? -- Part II Why does it matter? Variation and other fields -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Linguistic theory and the two types of variation that it needs to deal with -- 7.3 Inter-speaker variation and linguistic theory
7.4 Intra-speaker variation and linguistic theory -- 7.5 Conclusion -- 7.6 Where next? -- 8 Variation and change -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 The study of change in progress -- 8.2.1 The social distribution of change in progress -- 8.2.2 The linguistic distribution of innovations -- 8.3 Real and apparent time -- 8.4 Variation and change and historical linguistics -- 8.5 Change and linguistic theory -- 8.6 Conclusion -- 8.7 Where next? -- 9 Variation and forensic linguistics -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.1.1 Variation and forensic linguistics -- 9.2 Varieties and identification: linguistic evidence -- 9.2.1 Forensic phonetics -- 9.2.2 Authorship -- 9.2.3 Asylum and language analysis -- 9.2.4 Presenting linguistic evidence -- 9.3 Varieties and their influence: language in and of legal systems -- 9.3.1 Code choice by lay participants in legal systems -- 9.3.2 Code choice by legal participants in legal systems -- 9.4 Conclusion -- 9.5 Where next? -- Websites -- 10 Variation and identity -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 What is the role of identity in variationist research? -- 10.3 How do linguistic variables mean? -- 10.4 What types of variable can mean? -- 10.5 Where is meaning situated? -- 10.6 Where next? -- 11 Variation and populations -- 11.1 Why populations? -- 11.2 Correlations between genetic and linguistic variation -- 11.2.1 Nature of genetic variation -- 11.2.2 How do you pick your population? -- 11.2.3 Not all genetic markers are equal: allele frequencies -- 11.2.4 The Y-chromosome and the mitochondria - haplogroups, founders and dating in genetics -- 11.3 Genetic clues to linguistic history: analysing variation in English -- 11.3.1 The origins of English -- 11.3.2 Did fifth-century England witness a case of complete genocide? -- 11.4 Where next? -- 12 Variation and education -- 12.1 Introduction
12.2 Variation and education in a political context: an example from England and Wales -- 12.3 What we know -- 12.3.1 Standard English -- 12.3.2 Switching and crossing -- 12.3.3 Vernaculars in the classroom -- 12.4 What we don't know (and how we might find out) -- 12.4.1 The role of factors other than local dialect -- 12.4.2 Conventionalisation and standardisation -- 12.4.3 Exploring the unknown -- 12.5 Why it matters -- 12.6 Where next? -- Notes -- 1 COLLECTING DATA ON PHONOLOGY -- 2 HOW TO MAKE INTUITIONS SUCCEED: TESTING METHODS FOR ANALYSING SYNTACTIC MICROVARIATION -- 3 CORPORA: CAPTURING LANGUAGE IN USE -- 4 HYPOTHESIS GENERATION -- 5 QUANTIFYING RELATIONS BETWEEN DIALECTS -- 6 PERCEPTUAL DIALECTOLOGY -- 10 VARIATION AND IDENTITY -- 12 VARIATION AND EDUCATION -- References -- Index
This book brings together a range of perspectives on the collection, analysis and broader relevance of variable language data
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Maguire, Warren Analysing Variation in English Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2011 9780521898669
Subject English language -- Variation.;Linguistic change
Electronic books
Alt Author McMahon, April
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