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020    9783110847284|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9783110122077 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC3044897 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL3044897 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10802166 
035    (OCoLC)922948158 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 P295.P35 1990eb 
082 0  415 
100 1  Payne, Doris L 
245 14 The Pragmatics of Word Order :|bTypological Dimensions of 
       Verb Initial Languages 
264  1 Berlin/Boston :|bDe Gruyter, Inc.,|c2013 
264  4 |c©1990 
300    1 online resource (309 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  Empirical Approaches to Language Typology [EALT] Ser. ;
       |vv.7 
505 0  Intro -- Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Abbreviations -- 
       Chapter One. Introduction -- 1.1. Genetic and typological 
       affiliations -- 1.2. Demography and ethnography -- 1.3. 
       Previous linguistic work on Peba-Yaguan -- 1.4. Data for 
       the current study -- Chapter Two. Constituent Order and 
       Order Correlations -- 2.1. Observations of constituent 
       order co-occurrences -- 2.2. The verb initial norm (VIN) -
       - 2.3. Selected theoretical approaches accounting for word
       order correspondences -- 2.4. Identification of basic 
       constituent order -- 2.5. Towards an adequate constituent 
       order typology -- Chapter Three. Clausal Phenomena -- 3.1.
       Major structural clause types -- 3.2. Impersonals and 
       functionally related constructions -- 3.3. Auxiliaries -- 
       3.4. Second position clitics -- 3.5. Causation and 
       desideration -- 3.6. Parataxis -- 3.7. Negatives and 
       modals -- 3.8. Questions -- 3.9. Comparatives and 
       equatives -- 3.10. Coordination and alternative relations 
       -- 3.11. Complex sentences -- 3.12. Summary -- Chapter 
       Four. Noun and Postpositional Phrase Phenomena -- 4.1. 
       Bound modifying roots -- 4.2. Determination of head versus
       modifier within noun phrases -- 4.3. Order of head noun 
       and descriptive modifier in text -- 4.4. Complex modifying
       phrases -- 4.5. Genitives -- 4.6. Postpositional phrases -
       - 4.7. Summary -- Chapter Five. Noun Classification and 
       Nominalization -- 5.1. Derivational uses of classifiers --
       5.2. Inflectional uses of classifiers -- 5.3. Anaphora and
       classifiers -- 5.4. Theoretical status of Yagua 
       classifiers -- Chapter Six. The Verb Phrase and Related 
       Issues -- 6.1. Verbal nexus -- 6.2. Adverbs -- 6.3. 
       Subject - object asymmetries: Evidence for a verb phrase 
       containing the object? -- 6.4. Incorporation -- 6.5. An 
       overview of verbal morphology -- 6.6. The instrumental/
       comitative -ta -- 6.7. Morphological causatives with -
       tániy -- 6.8. Summary 
505 8  Chapter Seven. Pragmatic Factors Motivating Order 
       Variation -- 7.1. General pragmatic structure of Yagua 
       clauses -- 7.2. The pragmatically marked nucleus -- 7.3. 
       Function of the PM' component -- 7.4. Functions of the PM 
       component -- 7.5. Summary of pragmatically marked types --
       7.6. Frequency distribution of syntactic constituent 
       orders -- 7.7. Relative order of direct objects and 
       obliques -- 7.8. Summary -- Chapter Eight. Constituent 
       Order in Yagua: Conclusions and Implications -- 8.1. 
       Arguments in favor of SVO as basic -- 8.2. Arguments 
       against SVO as basic -- 8.3. Summary of typological traits
       -- 8.4. Implications for head-dependent ordering 
       principles and Hawkins' Universals -- 8.5. Yagua as a head
       marking language -- Appendix 1: Lagarto (Alligator) Text -
       - Appendix 2: Phonology -- Notes -- References -- Index 
520    The series is a platform for contributions of all kinds to
       this rapidly developing field. General problems are 
       studied from the perspective of individual languages, 
       language families, language groups, or language samples. 
       Conclusions are the result of a deepened study of 
       empirical data. Special emphasis is given to little-known 
       languages, whose analysis may shed new light on long-
       standing problems in general linguistics 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Grammar, Comparative and general -- Word order.;Typology 
       (Linguistics);Pragmatics 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aPayne, Doris L.|tThe Pragmatics of Word 
       Order : Typological Dimensions of Verb Initial Languages
       |dBerlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc.,c2013|z9783110122077 
830  0 Empirical Approaches to Language Typology [EALT] Ser 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=3044897|zClick to View