Record:   Prev Next
Author Gwatkin, Davidson R
Title Reaching the Poor with Health, Nutrition, and Population Services : What Works, What Doesn't, and Why
Imprint Herndon : World Bank Publications, 2005
©2005
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (380 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Data Notes -- PART 1. INTRODUCTION -- 1. Why Were the Reaching the Poor Studies Undertaken? -- 2. How Were the Reaching the Poor Studies Done? -- 3. What Did the Reaching the Poor Studies Find? -- PART 2. AFRICA STUDIES -- 4. Ghana and Zambia: Achieving Equity in the Distribution of Insecticide-Treated Bednets through Links with Measles Vaccination Campaigns -- 5. Kenya: Reaching the Poor through the Private Sector-A Network Model for Expanding Access to Reproductive Health Services -- 6. South Africa: Who Goes to the Public Sector for Voluntary HIV/AIDS Counseling and Testing? -- PART 3. ASIA STUDIES -- 7. Bangladesh: Inequalities in Utilization of Maternal Health Care Services-Evidence from Matlab -- 8. Cambodia: Using Contracting to Reduce Inequity in Primary Health Care Delivery -- 9. India: Assessing the Reach of Three SEWA Health Services among the Poor -- 10. India: Equity Effects of Quality Improvements on Health Service Utilization and Patient Satisfaction in Uttar Pradesh State -- 11. Nepal: The Distributional Impact of Participatory Approaches on Reproductive Health for Disadvantaged Youths -- PART 4. LATIN AMERICA STUDIES -- 12. Argentina: Assessment of Changes in the Distribution of Benefits from Health and Nutrition Policies -- 13. Brazil: Are Health and Nutrition Programs Reaching the Neediest? -- 14. Peru: Is Identifying the Poor the Main Problem in Reaching Them with Nutritional Programs? -- About the Authors -- Index -- FIGURES -- 1.1 Proportion of Benefits from Government Health Service Expenditures Going to the Lowest and Highest Income Quintiles, 21 Countries -- 1.2 Under-Five Mortality Rates among Lowest and Highest Income Quintiles, 56 Countries
1.3 Use of Basic Maternal and Child Health Services by Lowest and Highest Income Quintiles, 50+ Countries -- 2.1 Leakage and Undercoverage in Targeting in a Fee Waiver Program -- 2.2 Changes in the Distribution of Underweight Children, Ceará, Brazil -- 2.3 Concentration Curves Showing Changes in the Distribution of Underweight Children, Ceará, Brazil -- 4.1 Household Ownership of Insecticide-Treated Nets (ITNs) by Socioeconomic Status, Ghana and Zambia -- 5.1 Distribution of Residents of Areas Where KMET Members Are Located, by Wealth Quintile -- 5.2 Distribution of KMET Member and Nonmember Clients, by Wealth Quintile -- 6.1 Township Asset Scores Compared with Urban Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) Wealth Quintiles, South Africa -- 6.2 Patient Asset Scores Compared with Urban Wealth Quintiles, South Africa -- 6.3 Patient Asset Scores Compared with Township Wealth Quintiles, South Africa -- 7.1 Matlab ICDDR,B Health and Demographic Surveillance Area, Bangladesh -- 7.2 Obstetric Deliveries in ICDDR,B Service Area by Place of Delivery, 12,080 Births, Bangladesh, 1997-2001 -- 7.3 Trends in Access to Skilled Delivery Care by Wealth Quintile, 11,555 Cases, Bangladesh, 1997-2001 -- 8.1 Changes in Health Care Coverage Rates, Cambodia Study, 1997-2001 -- 8.2 Changes in Concentration Index by Health Care Indicator and Model, Cambodia Study -- 9.1 Frequency Distribution of Urban SEWA Health Users by Deciles of the Socioeconomic Status (SES) Index Score -- 9.2 SEWAHealth Service Utilization Concentration Curves, Ahmedabad City -- 9.3 Frequency Distribution of Rural SEWA Health Users, by Deciles of the Socioeconomic Status (SES) Index Score -- 9.4 SEWA Health Service Utilization Concentration Curves, Rural Areas (Vimo SEWA 2003 as Reference Standard) -- 10.1 Study Design and Sample, Uttar Pradesh
10.2 Difference of Differences in Average New Monthly Visits at Project and Control Health Facilities for Patients from Lowest and Highest Wealth Groups, Uttar Pradesh -- 10.3 Difference of Differences in Mean Patient Satisfaction Scores from Project to Control Health Facilities by Wealth Group, Uttar Pradesh -- 11.1 Wealth Quintile Cutoff Points, Nepal -- 11.2 Delivery in a Medical Facility: First Pregnancy, Poor and Nonpoor Young Married Women, Nepal -- 11.3 Knowledge of At Least Two Modes of HIV Transmission, by Wealth Quartile, Young Men and Women Age 14-21, Nepal -- 12.1 Mean Disposable Income, Argentina, 1980-2002 -- 12.2 Gini Coefficients for Household Per Capita Income, Greater Buenos Aires, 1980-2002 -- 12.3 Poverty Headcount Ratio, Greater Buenos Aires, 1980-2002 -- 12.4 Use of Antenatal Care, Argentina -- 12.5 Concentration Curves, Health Services, Argentina, 1997 -- 12.6 Concentration Curves, Immunization Programs, Argentina, 1997 -- 12.7 Concentration Curves, Visits to a Doctor and BCG Vaccination, Argentina, 1997 -- 12.8 Concentration Curves, Nutrition Programs, Argentina, 1997 -- 12.9 Concentration Curves, Antenatal Care, Attended Delivery, Medicines, and Hospitalizations, 1997 and 2001 -- 12.10 Concentration Curves, Nutrition Programs, 1997 and 2001 -- 13.1 Distribution of the Population Covered by the Pastorate of the Child by Wealth Quintile and Weight-for-Age Z-Score, Indicating Program Focus (Incidence), Criciúma, 1996 -- 13.2 Distribution of Wealth Status for Residents of Areas Covered by the Family Health Program (PSF), Porto Alegre and Sergipe, and for PSF Users, Porto Alegre -- 13.3 Simple Model of Health Service Utilization -- 13.4 Percentage of the Population That Failed to Seek or to Receive Medical Attention on the First Attempt, by Wealth Quintile, Porto Alegre, 2003
13.5 Where Respondents Sought Health Care for the First Time during Previous 15 Days, by Wealth Quintile, Porto Alegre, 2003 -- 13.6 Use of Primary Health Care among Users of a Health Service in the Previous 15 Days, by Wealth Quintile and Health Insurance Coverage, Porto Alegre, 2003 -- 14.1 Size of Selected Public Programs, Peru, 2000 -- 14.2 Concentration Curves, Selected Public Food Programs, Peru, 2000 -- 14.3 Concentration Curves, Beneficiaries and Target Population, Selected Public Programs, Peru, 2000 -- 14.4 Marginal and Average Effects, Vaso de Leche and School Breakfast Programs, Peru, 2000 -- ANNEX FIGURE -- 14.1 Vaso de Leche and School Breakfast Program Coverage, by Quintile, Region, and Year, Peru -- TABLES -- 2.1 Questions Asked by the Studies Reported in This Volume -- 2.2 Data Sources Used by the Studies, by Chapter -- 3.1 Characteristics of the Programs Covered in This Volume -- 4.1 Distribution of Households within Districts by Wealth Quintile, Ghana (Phase I) and Zambia (Phase II) -- 4.2 Ownership of Insecticide-Treated Nets (ITNs): Reported Precampaign and Observed Postcampaign, by Wealth Quintile, Ghana (Phase I) and Zambia (Phase II) -- 4.3 Distribution of Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN) Use by Wealth Quintile, Ghana (Phase I) and Zambia (Phase II) -- 5.1 Types of Health Care Provider Covered in Study -- 5.2 Household Assets of Population Groups Covered in Study -- 5.3 Characteristics of Clients and Household Respondents Covered in Study -- 5.4 Educational Attainment among Clients and Households Covered in Study -- 5.5 Odds Ratios, Household Respondents Ever Having Visited KMET and Other Providers for Family Planning and Reproductive Health (FP/RH) Services -- 7.1 Utilization of Maternal Health Care Services, by Mother's Socioeconomic Status, 11,555 Cases, Bangladesh, 1997-2001
7.2 Logistic Regression Results from Pictorial Card Data for Sociodemographic Correlates of Skilled Attendance at Birth in ICDDR,B Service Area, Bangladesh, 1997-2001 -- 8.1 Districts Selected for Cambodia's Health Care Contracting Test -- 8.2 Average Annual Recurrent Expenditure Per Capita for Health Care Models in Contracting Test, Cambodia -- 8.3 Sample Sizes, Cambodia Study -- 8.4 Health Service Indicators: Definitions and Coverage Goals, Contracting-Out Test, Cambodia -- 8.5 Health Care Service Coverage by District and Indicator, Cambodia, 1997 and 2001 Surveys -- 8.6 Changes in Health Care Service Coverage by District and Indicator, Cambodia, 1997-2001 -- 8.7 Concentration Indexes, Cambodia, 1997 and 2001 Surveys -- 8.8 Change in Concentration Indexes by District and Health Care Indicator, Cambodia, 1997-2001 -- 8.9 Probit Results, Marginal Effects (dF/dx) on the Probability of Health Services Received in the Pooled Baseline and Follow-Up Surveys, Cambodia -- 9.1 Summary of the Three SEWAHealth Services Covered by the Reaching the Poor Study, India -- 9.2 Potential Demand- and Supply-Side Constraints on Utilization of SEWA Health's Services by the Poor -- 9.3 Percentage of All Service Users in Poorest Three Deciles -- 10.1 Activities Implemented under the Uttar Pradesh Health Systems Development Project, 2000-2002 -- 10.2 Mean Monthly New Outpatient Visits Per Facility at Project and Control Facilities, Baseline and Follow-Up Rounds, Uttar Pradesh -- 10.3 Distribution of Mean Monthly Number of New Outpatient Visits Per Facility by Wealth and Caste Group, Uttar Pradesh -- 10.4 Mean Patient Satisfaction Scores by Survey Round and Facility Type, Uttar Pradesh -- 10.5 Mean Satisfaction Scores by Wealth Group and Caste for Project and Control Sites at Baseline and Follow-Up, Uttar Pradesh -- 11.1 Adolescent Survey Samples and Subsamples, Nepal
11.2 Sample Means and Distributions for Variables in the Analysis, Nepal
This volume presents eleven case studies that document how well or poorly health, nutrition, and population programs have reached disadvantaged groups in the countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America where they were undertaken. The studies were commissioned by the Reaching the Poor Program, undertaken by the Word Bank in cooperation with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Dutch and Swedish governments, in an effort to find better ways of ensuring that health, nutrition, and population programs benefit the neediest. These case studies, reinforced by other material gathered by the Reaching the Poor Program, indicate clearly that health programs do not have to be inequitable. Although most health, nutrition, and population services achieve much lower coverage among disadvantaged groups than among the better-off, many significant and instructive exceptions exist. These show that the poor can be reached much more effectively than at present and point to potentially promising strategies for doing so
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Gwatkin, Davidson R. Reaching the Poor with Health, Nutrition, and Population Services : What Works, What Doesn't, and Why Herndon : World Bank Publications,c2005 9780821359617
Subject Health services accessibility -- Cross-cultural studies.;Health services accessibility -- Developing countries.;Human services -- Cross-cultural studies.;Human services -- Developing countries.;Poor -- Medical care -- Cross-cultural studies.;Poor -- Medical care -- Developing countries.;Poor -- Nutrition -- Cross-cultural studies
Electronic books
Alt Author Wagstaff, Adam
Yazbeck, Abdo S
Record:   Prev Next