Record:   Prev Next
Author Medin, Douglas L., author
Title Who's asking? : Native science, Western science, and science education / Douglas L. Medin and Megan Bang
Imprint Cambridge, Massachusetts : MIT Press, 2013
[Piscataqay, New Jersey] : IEEE Xplore, [2014]
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (xii, 282 pages) : illustrations
text rdacontent
electronic isbdmedia
online resource rdacarrier
Note CatMonthString:july.14
Multi-User
Includes bibliographical references and index
Introduction: Who's asking? -- Unsettling science -- Maps, models and the unity of science -- Values everywhere within science -- Science reflects who does it -- Culture and issues in cultural research -- Psychological distance and conceptions of nature -- Distance, perspective taking, and ecological relations -- Complicating cultural models : limitations of distance -- The argument so far -- A brief history of Indian education -- Culturally-based science education : navigating multiple epistemologies -- Community-based science education : Menominee focus -- Community-based science education : AIC focus -- Partnership in community : some consequences -- Summary, conclusions, implications
Restricted to subscribers or individual electronic text purchasers
The answers to scientific questions depend on who's asking, because the questions asked and the answers sought reflect the cultural values and orientations of the questioner. These values and orientations are most often those of Western science. In Who's Asking?, Douglas Medin and Megan Bang argue that despite the widely held view that science is objective, value-neutral, and acultural, scientists do not shed their cultures at the laboratory or classroom door; their practices reflect their values, belief systems, and worldviews. Medin and Bang argue further that scientist diversity -- the participation of researchers and educators with different cultural orientations -- provides new perspectives and leads to more effective science and better science education. Medin and Bang compare Native American and European American orientations toward the natural world and apply these findings to science education. The European American model, they find, sees humans as separated from nature; the Native American model sees humans as part of a natural ecosystem. Medin and Bang then report on the development of ecologically oriented and community-based science education programs on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin and at the American Indian Center of Chicago. Medin and Bang's novel argument for scientist diversity also has important implications for questions of minority underrepresentation in science
Also available in print
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Description based on PDF viewed 12/23/2015
Link Print version 9780262026628
Subject Indians -- Science
Indian philosophy
Science -- Philosophy
Ethnoscience
Science -- Study and teaching
Indians -- Education
Science -- Social aspects
Science -- Political aspects
Electronic books
Abstracts
Animals
Art
Batteries
Biological system modeling
Biology
Birds
Blood
Chapters
Cognition
Collaboration
Communities
Concrete
Context
Cultural differences
Drives
Earth
Economics
Education
Educational institutions
Encoding
Ethics
Europe
Evolution (biology)
Forestry
Game theory
Games
Geology
Global communication
Heart beat
History
Indexes
Instruments
Lenses
Limiting
Marine animals
Materials
Mathematical model
Medical services
Motion pictures
Navigation
Pediatrics
Physics
Planning
Presses
Printing machinery
Psychology
Recycling
Reliability
Roads
Rocks
Sociology
Standards
Statistics
Turning
US Government
Alt Author Bang, Megan, 1975-
IEEE Xplore (Online Service), distributor
MIT Press, publisher
Record:   Prev Next