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020    9789027288912|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9789027210210 
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035    (Au-PeEL)EBL622454 
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040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 P94.6 -- .D538 2009eb 
082 0  303.48/2 
100 1  Baraldi, Claudio 
245 10 Dialogue in Intercultural Communities :|bFrom an 
       educational point of view 
264  1 Amsterdam :|bJohn Benjamins Publishing Company,|c2009 
264  4 |c©2009 
300    1 online resource (288 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
505 0  Dialogue in Intercultural Communities -- Editorial page --
       Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- 
       Introduction -- Empowering dialogue in intercultural 
       settings -- 1.1 Culture, communication, interaction -- 1.2
       Positioning in communication -- 1.3 Cultural change and 
       intercultural communication -- 1.3.1 Cultural change -- 
       1.3.2 Intercultural communication and transcultural forms 
       -- 1.4 Empowering dialogue, dialogic mediation and 
       conflict management -- 1.4.1 Empowering dialogue -- 1.4.2 
       Dialogic mediation and conflict management -- 1.5 
       Education -- 1.5.1 Educational systems today -- 1.5.2 
       Intercultural education -- 1.6 Promoting participatory 
       processes -- 1.7 Dialogic actions -- 1.8 The passage to 
       empirical observation -- The research project -- 2.1 From 
       theoretical framework to empirical research -- 2.2 An 
       overview of CISV narrative and activities -- 2.2.1 
       Narrative -- 2.2.2 Activities -- 2.3 The research -- 2.4 
       The methodology -- 2.5 The research design -- 2.6 The next
       chapters -- 2.7 The symbols -- The CISV narrative -- 3.1 
       General features of the CISV narrative -- 3.2 The 
       narrative of diversity and friendship -- 3.3 The narrative
       of learning, autonomy and active participation -- 3.4 The 
       narrative of conflict and conflict management -- 3.5 The 
       narrative of adults' contributions to empowering dialogue 
       -- 3.6 The narrative of the experience -- 3.7 The 
       influence of cultural variability on CISV narratives -- 
       3.8 Conclusions -- Organisational meetings 1 -- 4.1 
       Organisational meetings -- 4.2 Projecting empowering 
       dialogue -- 4.2.1 Inviting clarification questions -- 
       4.2.2 Asking for support -- 4.3 Projecting normative 
       expectations -- 4.4 Coordination and mediation in decision
       -making -- 4.4.1 Coordination -- 4.4.2 Mediation -- 4.5 
       Assessments -- 4.5.1 Educational stances -- 4.5.2 Control 
       and judgement -- 4.5.3 Disclaiming 
505 8  4.5.4 Self-positioning as an expert -- 4.6 Conclusions -- 
       Organisational meetings 2 -- 5.1 Conflicts in 
       organisational meetings -- 5.2 Conflict normative 
       resolution -- 5.3 Withdrawal and minimisation -- 5.4 
       Elusion through diversion -- 5.5 Mitigation and 
       postponement -- 5.6 Coordination and mediation -- 5.7 
       Conclusions -- Activities 1 -- 6.1 Education and promotion
       of participation -- 6.2 Monologues: Focusing on tasks and 
       normative expectations -- 6.3 Empowering dialogue -- 6.3.1
       Summer camps -- 6.3.2 Villages -- 6.4 Ambivalences -- 6.5 
       Conclusions -- Activities 2 -- 7.1 Reflection in 
       educational activities -- 7.2 Hierarchical structures -- 
       7.3 QAA sequences and socio-epistemic claims -- 7.3.1 Use 
       of candidate answers within questions -- 7.3.2 Use of 
       interrogative negative questions -- 7.4 Children's 
       reactions -- 7.4.1 Children's downgrading of their own 
       competence -- 7.4.2 Cooperating in the management of 
       rights and responsibilities -- 7.4.3 Resisting socio-
       epistemic claims: Non-type conforming answers -- 7.5 
       Question-Answer-Appreciation sequences -- 7.6 Conclusions 
       -- Activities 3 -- 8.1 Conflicts in educational activities
       -- 8.2 Conflict avoidance -- 8.3 Conflict normative 
       resolution -- 8.3.1 Villages -- 8.3.2 Summer camps -- 8.4 
       Requests and assessments of understanding -- 8.5 
       Ambivalent coordination and mediation -- 8.6 Conclusions -
       - Activities 4 -- 9.1 Adolescents in the interaction -- 
       9.2 Coordination as distribution of participation -- 9.3 
       Coordination as active proposal -- 9.4 Ambivalence and 
       monologues -- 9.5 Conflict management -- 9.5.1 Ballot -- 
       9.5.2 Withdrawal -- 9.5.3 Diversion -- 9.6 Conclusions -- 
       Activities 5 -- 10.1 The importance of translation -- 10.2
       Translations as monologues: Selection of information -- 
       10.3 Translations as formulations: Gatekeeping and 
       conflict management -- 10.4 Dyadic management of conflicts
505 8  10.5 Dyadic and triadic mediation -- 10.6 Triadic 
       mediation among adolescents -- 10.7 Conclusions -- 
       Conclusions -- 1. A short summary -- 2. The relevance of 
       language in interactions -- 3. Linguistic cues: A summary 
       -- 3.1 Disempowering monologue -- 3.2 Empowering dialogue 
       -- 4. The meanings of dyadic hierarchical interactions -- 
       4.1 Dyadic education, expectations and participatory 
       processes -- 4.2 Conflict prevention, avoidance and 
       normative resolution -- 4.3 Instrumental translation -- 5.
       The meanings of dialogic relationships -- 5.1 The 
       importance of empowering dialogue -- 5.2 Prevailing 
       dialogic actions -- 5.3 Coordination and mediation -- 6. 
       Transcultural communication and cosmopolitanism -- 7. 
       Empowering dialogue, personal expressions and successful 
       socialisation -- References -- Index -- The series 
       Dialogue Studies 
520    Conclusions highlight the ways in which the use of 
       language in interactions provides important cues for 
       analyzing the cultural presuppositions of CISV activities,
       through both empowering dialogues and disempowering 
       monologues. The analysis of interactions and participants'
       narratives shows both (1) dyadic hierarchical interactions
       associated with conflict avoidance, normative conflict 
       resolution and instrumental translation, and (2) dialogic 
       empowering relationships based on specific dialogic 
       actions supporting and confirming active participation, 
       such as promotional questions, continuers, echoes, 
       systematic appreciations, transformative formulations, and
       suggestive narratives. In the activities analysed, 
       promotion of agency and personal expressions, through 
       coordination and dialogic mediation, seems to be more 
       important than insistence on intercultural relationships, 
       and improvements in this promotion seems to be crucial for
       education to peace in intercultural settings 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Intercultural communication.;Communication 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aBaraldi, Claudio|tDialogue in 
       Intercultural Communities : From an educational point of 
       view|dAmsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2009
       |z9789027210210 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=622454|zClick to View