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Author Farrall, Jeremy
Title Sanctions, Accountability and Governance in a Globalised World
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2009
©2009
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (508 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Connecting International Law with Public Law
Connecting International Law with Public Law
Note Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Series editors' preface -- Editors' preface -- Introduction: Filling or falling between the cracks? Law's potential -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Setting the foundations -- 3. Internationalising public law -- 4. Implementing Security Council sanctions -- 5. The place of corporations -- 6. The role of lawyers -- 7. Public law and public policy -- 8. Parallel case studies -- 9. Conclusion -- Notes -- Part I Setting down the foundations -- 1: Whose public? Which law? Mapping the internal/external distinction in international law -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The two faces of international law -- 2.1 Formalism and instrumentalism -- 2.2 Dualism and the modern structure of international law -- 3. The question of human rights in Rawls's Law of Peoples -- 4. The implications of value pluralism for public law -- 4.1 The logic of Westphalian sovereignty -- 4.2 Conflicts of rights and the problem of incommensurability -- 4.3 From foundationalism to intersubjectivity -- 4.4 Individuals and peoples -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- 2: The potential for a post-Westphalian convergence of 'public law' and 'public international law' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. 'Strong states' and 'Enlightenment values' -- 2.1 Globalisation and universal values -- 3. A paradigm shift in the basis of constitutional legitimacy -- 3.1 The paradigm shift and the global enlightenment -- 3.1.1 Who speaks for whom? -- 3.1.2 International legal personality -- 3.1.3 Legitimating intervention in some cases -- 3.1.4 Elimination of the conflict between sovereignty and human rights -- 3.1.5 Liability for sovereign debt -- 3.1.6 Treatment of coup leaders -- 3.1.7 Taking constitutions seriously -- 3.1.8 The rule of law -- 3.1.9 Towards the unification of public law and public international law -- 4. Conclusions -- Notes
Part II Internationalising public law -- 3: Globalisation and public law: A global administrative law? -- 1. Global administration -- 2. Accountability deficits -- 3. Some animals are more equal than others -- 4. Conclusion -- Notes -- 4: The deliberative deficit: Transparency, access to information and UN sanctions -- 1. Interrogating Security Council practice: Transparency and Security Council decisionaking on sanctions -- 1.1 Nature of Security Council decision-making on sanctions -- 2. Challenging the transparency paradigm: Transparency, legitimacy and the Security Council -- 3. A concise methodology for determination of general principles -- 4. Nature and significance of right of access to information in different legal systems -- 5. Towards a general principle of access to information: Content, scope and exceptions -- 5.1 Presumption of maximum disclosure -- 5.1.1 Limits on bodies from whom information may be requested -- 5.1.2 No need to demonstrate special interest -- 5.1.3 Conclusion -- 5.2 Exception where reasonable link established between disclosure and identifiable threat to national security and defence -- 5.2.1 Narrow designation -- 5.2.2 Degree of harm -- 5.2.3 Need for identifiable threat -- 5.2.4 Balancing test with public interest in disclosure -- 5.2.5 Least restrictive -- 5.2.6 Conclusion -- 5.3 Independent review of decisions to deny access -- 5.3.1 European Union -- 5.3.2 United Kingdom -- 5.3.3 United States -- 5.3.4 Conclusion -- 5.4 Obligation to publish -- 6. Conclusion -- Notes -- 5: Who guards the guardian? Towards regulation of the UN Security Council's Chapter VII powers through dialogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Security Council and distrust -- 3. Inherent limits of judicial review -- 4. Legal accountability through dialogue -- 4.1 Theoretical basis -- 4.2 Regulatory conversation model -- 4.2.1 Commitment
4.2.2 Accessibility -- 4.2.3 Authority -- 4.2.4 Accountability -- 5. Implications of the regulatory conversational model -- 6. Conclusion -- Notes -- 6: Holding the United Nations Security Council accountable for human rights violations through domestic and regional courts: A case of 'be careful what you wish for'? -- 1. Background -- 1.1 The legal framework -- 1.2 The Yusuf and Kadi decisions -- 2. Challenging the reasoning on the basis of public international law -- 2.1 The relationship between article 103 and article 24 of the Charter and ius cogens -- 2.2 Judicial review of the application of Security Council decisions -- 2.3 The right to a fair hearing -- 2.3.1 The content of a right to a fair hearing -- 2.3.2 The CFI's analysis of the Al-aeda Sanctions Committee's (de-) Listing procedure -- 3. Assessment in light of subsequent developments -- Notes -- Part III Implementing Security Council sanctions -- 7: 'A delicate business': Did AWB's kickbacks to Iraq under the United Nations Oil-For-Food Programme constitute a violation of Australia's international obligations? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. UN Iraq sanctions, the Oil-For-Food Programme and the AWB kickbacks -- 3. Australia's obligations under the Charter to implement Security Council sanctions resolutions -- 3.1 The travaux préparatoires of the Charter -- 3.1.1 The travaux préparatoires of the Charter: Article 25 -- 3.1.2 The travaux préparatoires of the Charter: Articles 41 and 48 -- 3.2 The ICJ's jurisprudence on Article 25 -- 3.3 The ICJ's approach to interpreting the Charter -- 3.4 The role of 'subsequent practice' in Charter interpretation -- 4. Was there a breach of Australia's customary international law obligation to observe a standard of 'due diligence' in its performance of its international obligations? -- 5. State responsibility -- 6. Standards of accountability and governance
7. Conclusion -- Notes -- 8: Should the United Nations Security Council leave it to the experts? The governance and accountability of UN sanctions monitoring -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The UN Charter sanctions framework and the traditional model of sanctions monitoring -- 3. The turn to experts -- 3.1 Commissions: Disarmament commissions and commissions of inquiry -- 3.1.1 Disarmament commissions -- 3.1.2 Commissions of inquiry -- 3.2 Monitoring mechanisms, groups and teams -- 3.2.1 Monitoring mechanisms -- 3.2.2 Monitoring teams -- 3.2.3 Monitoring groups -- 3.3 Panels, groups, committees and teams of experts -- 3.3.1 Committees and teams of experts -- 3.3.2 Panels and groups of experts -- 4. The governance and accountability of UN sanctions expert bodies -- 4.1 Governance -- 4.1 1 The Security Council -- 4.1.2 Sanctions committees -- 4.1.3 The UN Secretariat -- 4.1.4 Expert bodies -- 4.2 Accountability -- 4.2.1 Accountability of expert bodies -- 4.2.2 Accountability of the UN Secretariat -- 4.2.3 Accountability of sanctions committees -- 4.2.4 Accountability of the Security Council -- 5. An alternative vision of sanctions monitoring -- 6. Conclusion -- Notes -- Part IV The place of corporations -- 9: The nexus between human rights and business: Defining the sphere of corporate responsibility -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What nexus? The emergence and acknowledgment of the relationship between human rights and business -- 2.1 Human rights treaties and their interpretation -- 2.2 International law: Isolated examples of direct engagement with business -- 2.3 United Nations sanctions -- 2.4 Soft law developments -- 3. Sphere of responsibility for human rights: States -- 3.1 Jurisdictional basis for extraterritorial protection -- 3.2 What type of human rights abuses matter? -- 4. Sphere of responsibility for human rights: Corporations
4.3 The nature of the obligation -- 4.1 To whom is the obligation owed? -- 4.2 When is the obligation owed? -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- 10: At the intersection of international and municipal law: The case of Commissioner Cole and the Wheat Export Authority -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Domestic regulation and international obligations -- 3. Case study: Commissioner Cole and the role of the Wheat Export Authority -- 3.1 The privatisation of the Australian Wheat Board -- 3.2 The role of the Wheat Export Authority -- 4. The regulatory aftermath of the Cole Inquiry -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- Part V The role of lawyers -- 11: International legal advisers and transnational corporations: Untangling roles and responsibilities for sanctions compliance -- 1. Introduction -- 2. International legal advisers and their clients -- 2.1 The Foreign Ministry and its Minister -- 2.2 The executive branch -- 2.3 Government departments -- 2.4 Private individuals and corporations -- 2.5 The resulting role for international legal advisers -- 3. Australian implementation of sanctions against Iraq -- 4. Administrative law's potential and the role of legal advisers -- 4.1 Linking public institutions with transnational actors -- 4.2 Administrative law considerations and Foreign Ministry advice for corporations -- 4.3 Administrative law considerations and corporate interaction with UN sanctions committees -- 5. Conclusions -- Appendix: Additional sources from the Cole Commission of Inquiry -- UN Office of the Iraq Programme -- UN Office of Legal Affairs -- UN Security Council Committee established by Resolution 661 (1990) concerning the situation between Iraq and Kuwait -- UN Independent Inquiry Committee -- DFAT ministerial submissions -- Statutory Declarations from past or present Commonwealth Officers -- DFAT minutes -- DFAT correspondence -- DFAT cables -- Other DFAT documents
Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet
First in a series examining connections between international and public law, discussing sanction implementation within the confines of domestic law
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Farrall, Jeremy Sanctions, Accountability and Governance in a Globalised World Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2009 9780521114929
Subject International and municipal law -- Congresses.;Public law -- Congresses.;Sanctions (International law) -- Congresses.;Economic sanctions -- Iraq -- Congresses
Electronic books
Alt Author Rubenstein, Kim
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