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Author Kabata, Kaori
Title Usage-based Approaches to Japanese Grammar : Towards the understanding of human language
Imprint Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014
©2014
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (318 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Studies in Language Companion Series ; v.156
Studies in Language Companion Series
Note Usage-based Approaches to Japanese Grammar -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgement -- List of contributors -- Situating usage-based (Japanese) linguistics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Themes in usage-based linguistics -- 2.1 Universals and cross-linguistic orientation -- 2.2 External factors and interdisciplinary orientation -- 2.3 Parting from intuition -- 2.4 Non-discrete nature of linguistic categories -- 2.5 No division between synchrony and diachrony -- 3. Preview of the articles -- References -- Part 1. Cognition and language use -- Subordination and information status -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Foreground vs. background information -- 3. Degree of subordination -- 4. Object complement clause in Japanese -- 4.1 Overview -- 4.2 To vs. Koto: Syntactic differences and degree of subordination -- 4.3 To vs. Koto: Functional differences -- 5. Conclusion -- List of abbreviations -- References -- On state of mind and grammatical forms from functional perspectives -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Grammar and usage of garu and te-iru -- 2.1 Garu -- 2.2 Te-iru -- 2.3 The commonality of garu and te-iru -- 3. Theoretical justification -- 4. Concluding remarks -- Appendix -- Samples -- References -- Grammar of the internal expressive sentences in Japanese -- 1. Japanese scholarship on the internal expressive sentence -- 2. The nature of the internal expressive sentence -- 2.1 Expressive and descriptive sentences -- 2.2 Three semantic primitives of an expressive sentence -- 2.3 Interim summary -- 3. Grammar of internal expressive sentences and the neurological processes -- 3.1 Reflex expression -- 3.2 One-term expressions -- 3.3 Two-term expressions -- 4. External descriptive sentences - revisited -- 5. Summary -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- Subjectivity, intersubjectivity and Japanese grammar
1. Introduction -- 2. Subjectivity vs. intersubjectivity -- 2.1 Predicate order -- 2.2 Mental vs. speech act verb dichotomy -- 2.3 Unidirectionality in grammaticalization -- 3. On the fundamentality of subjectivity and intersubjectivity -- 4. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- What typology reveals about modality in Japanese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Revisiting the semantic and formal categories of modality in Japanese: A cross-linguistic assessment -- 2.1 Modality and its formal coding in linguistic typology -- 2.2 Modality and its formal coding in Japanese -- 3. Modality and its formal coding in Japanese, Korean, English, and German -- 3.1 Modal systems in Japanese, Korean, English, and German -- 3.2 Mood in Japanese, Korean, German, and English -- 3.3 Discourse systems in Japanese, Korean, English, and German -- 4. Why does Japanese have the distribution of modality categories it has? A communicative-discursive perspective -- 5. Conclusion and implications for grammar -- Abbreviations -- References -- Part 2. Frequency, interaction and language use -- If rendaku isn't a rule, what in the world is it? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Fundamental irregularity -- 3. Lyman's Law -- 4. Direct object + verb stem -- 5. Analogy -- 6. An illusion of regularity? -- References -- The semantic basis of grammatical development -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Tense-aspect -- 2.1 Lexical aspect -- 2.2 Language bioprogram hypothesis: PNPD and SPD -- 2.3 Input distribution as explanation -- 3. Distributional learning and prototype-based initial representations -- 4. Other evidence for input-driven acquisition -- 4.1 Causative morpheme -sase in Japanese -- 4.2 Conditionals in Japanese and Korean -- 4.3 Nominative case-marker drop in Japanese and Korean -- 4.4 Relative clause constructions in Japanese -- 5. A methodological objection to the prototype model
6. Input vs. innateness in language acquisition -- 7. Prototypes vs. modularity -- 8. What is the nature of the grammar that children acquire? -- 9. Conclusion -- References -- Interchangeability of so-called interchangeable particles -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Semantic characterization of Ni vs. E -- 3. Ni and E in the speaker judgment data -- 3.1 Procedure -- 3.2 Results -- 4. Ni and E in spoken data -- 4.1 Methodology -- 4.2 Results -- 5. Ni and E in written text data -- 5.1 Methodology -- 5.2 Results -- 6. Discussion -- 7. Implication to grammar -- References -- Appendix -- The re-examination of so-called 'clefts' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Discourse functional studies of cleft constructions -- 3. Single unit turns versus multiunit turns -- 4. Analysis of so-called 'clefts' in multiparty talk-in-interaction -- 4.1 A case of a multiunit turn that ends with a predicate corresponding to the topic clause -- 4.2 A case of a multiunit turn that does not end with a clear linguistic marking -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Appendix: Transcription conventions and abbreviations -- References -- Activity, participation, and joint turn construction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Activity and participation as analytic concepts -- 3. Differentiated participation in situated activities through joint turn construction -- 3.1 Interactive achievement of shared perspectives -- 2.2 Differentiated displays of empathetic understanding of another's experience -- 2.3 Assisted explaining -- 2.4 Converting a dispreferred action to a preferred action -- 4. Concluding remarks -- 5. Appendix -- 5.1 Transcript symbols -- 5.2 Abbreviations used in the interlinear gloss -- 5.3 Double parentheses in the translation lines -- References -- Part 3. Language change and variation -- Context in constructions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background of non-subject honorifics
3. O-Verb(stem)-suru construction: Use 1 - Nonsubject honorifics -- 4. O-V(stem)-suru construction: Direction toward performative honorifics -- 4.1 Use 2: Subject referent ≈ Speaker -- non-subject referent ≈ addressee -- 4.2 Use 3: Addressee honorific use (Subject Referent ≈ Addressee) -- 5. Frame semantic representations of the three uses of the O-Verb(stem)-Suru construction -- 6. Conclusion -- 7. List of abbreviations -- References -- The use and interpretation of "regional" and "standard" variants in Japanese conversation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 3. Results and discussion -- 3.1 Inter- and intraspeaker variation -- 3.2 Mixing "regional" and "Standard" variants -- 3.3 Code-switching or variant-choice? -- 3.4 Variant-choice as a resource for style management -- 4. Conclusion and implications for grammar -- 5. Acknowledgment -- References -- Index
It is often said that language standardization has been steadily advancing in modern Japan and that speakers in regional Japan are now bi-dialectal and code-switch between "Standard" and "regional" Japanese. The notion of code-switching, however, assumes the existence of varieties, or well-defined linguistic systems, that are distinct from each other. In this study, I examine the use of "Standard Japanese" and "regional dialects" and argue that it is much more complex and dynamic than what can be possibly accounted for in terms of the notion of code-switching involving two distinct varieties. I explore an alternative account employing the notion of variant choice and characterize the social meanings of "Standard" and "regional" variants as context-dependent and as multiple and ambiguous
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Kabata, Kaori Usage-based Approaches to Japanese Grammar : Towards the understanding of human language Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2014 9789027259219
Subject Japanese language -- Usage.;Japanese language -- Spoken Japanese.;Japanese language -- Writing
Electronic books
Alt Author Ono, Tsuyoshi
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