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Author Marcus, Clare Cooper
Title Therapeutic Landscapes : An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing Gardens and Restorative Outdoor Spaces
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (338 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Therapeutic Landscapes: An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing Gardens and Restorative Outdoor Spaces -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- References -- Chapter 2: History of Hospital Outdoor Space -- References -- Chapter 3: Theory, Research, and Design Implications -- The View through a Window -- The Importance of Research -- Research informs design -- Research informs policy -- Evidence-Based Design -- Research on Benefits of Nature Exposure -- Virtual nature, real nature -- Scent, "forest bathing," and "green exercise" -- Nature and the city -- Theoretical and Philosophical Underpinnings -- Biophilia -- Prospect-refuge theory -- Stress: The "fight or flight" response -- Stress reduction theory -- Attention restoration theory -- Other Pertinent Theories for Evidence-Based Healthcare Design -- Emotional congruence theory -- The aesthetic placebo -- Nature and pleasure -- Next Steps -- References -- Chapter 4: Types and Locations of Therapeutic Landscapes in Healthcare -- Extensive Landscaped Grounds -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Borrowed Landscape -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Nature and Fitness Trails -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Landscaped Setback -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Front Porch -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Entry Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Backyard Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- A "Tucked Away" Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Courtyard -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- The Hole-in-a-Donut Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Plaza -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Roof Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Roof Terrace -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- A Peripheral Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Atrium Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages -- Viewing Garden -- Advantages -- Disadvantages
Chapter 5: The Participatory Design Process -- Legacy Health Overview -- Purpose of Legacy Health therapeutic gardens -- Design process -- Organizing Staff to Conceptualize Needs -- Design team meeting no. 1 -- Design team meeting no. 2 -- Design team meeting no. 3 -- Benefits of the Design Team Process -- So, How Do We Start? -- Key points for designers -- Key points for the healthcare team -- References -- Chapter 6: General Design Guidelines for Healthcare Facilities -- Overarching Design Considerations -- Safety, security, and privacy -- Accessibility-ADA and Universal Design -- Physical and emotional comfort -- Positive distraction -- Engagement with nature (biophilia) -- Maintenance and aesthetics -- Sustainability -- Programming and Site Planning Considerations -- Programming and site planning guidelines -- Specific Physical Design Guidelines for All Therapeutic Gardens -- General considerations -- Visual access -- Physical access -- Pathways -- Seating -- Utilities -- Lighting -- Water features -- Other garden elements -- References -- Chapter 7: Children's Hospital Gardens -- The Challenge of Multiple User Groups -- Design Guidelines -- General guidelines -- Pathways -- Seating -- Planting -- Utilities -- Case Studies -- References -- Chapter 8: Gardens for Cancer Patients -- References -- Chapter 9: Gardens for the Frail Elderly -- Design Guidelines -- General considerations -- Visual access -- Physical access -- Pathways -- Seating -- Planting -- Utilities -- References -- Chapter 10: Gardens for People with Alzheimer's and Other Dementias -- Introduction -- Design Guidelines -- General considerations -- Physical access -- Seating -- Pathways -- Planting -- Lighting -- Maintenance -- References -- Chapter 11: Hospice Gardens -- Design Guidelines for Hospice Gardens -- General considerations -- Visual access -- Physical access -- Planting
References -- Chapter 12: Gardens for Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities -- Design Guidelines -- Required -- Recommended -- References -- Chapter 13: Gardens for Veterans and Active Service Personnel -- The Wounds of War -- Traumatic brain injury -- Posttraumatic stress disorder -- A Dearth of Research -- Existing Research to Inform Design -- Built Works -- Guidelines -- "On the ground" research and sharing information -- The need for flexibility -- Logistical challenges -- Physical design guidelines -- References -- Chapter 14: Rehabilitation Gardens -- References -- Chapter 15: Restorative Gardens in Public Spaces -- References -- Chapter 16: Horticultural Therapy and Healthcare Garden Design -- Types of Programs -- Professional Training -- Influences on the Development of HT -- Roles of the Horticultural Therapist -- Program Settings -- Evidence Base for HT -- Design Guidelines for the HT Garden -- Programming HT-specific environments -- Programming for children with special needs -- Programming for frail elders in long-term-care facilities -- Funding -- Collaboration among Therapies -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 17: Planting and Maintaining Therapeutic Gardens -- Introduction -- Creating a Healthy Garden -- Advance planning -- Policies to be addressed -- Continued attention and adequate practice -- Basic Requirements for Plant Growth -- Sunlight -- Soil -- Water -- Plants: Assets and Costs -- Plant Placement -- Confidentiality and privacy -- Availability and proximity of seating -- Attractive destinations -- Places to linger and semiprivate spaces -- Areas for activities -- Plant Selection: Plants to Avoid -- Toxic and allergenic plants -- Nuisance plants -- Desirable Qualities of Plantings -- Providing a place of respite -- Addressing all of the senses -- Inviting interaction -- Plant Selection: Desirable Plants
Special Healthcare Settings -- Gardens for inpatient psychiatric facilities -- Gardens for children -- Gardens for the elderly and for dementia care -- Maintenance -- Policies: personnel -- Policies: budget -- Practical considerations -- References -- Chapter 18: Therapeutic Landscapes and Sustainability -- Complementary Approaches -- Progress -- Conflicts and Solutions -- References -- Chapter 19: The Business Case and Funding for Therapeutic Gardens -- Improved Patient Health and Well-Being -- Stress Reduction -- Improved Patient and Visitor Satisfaction -- Funding Therapeutic Gardens -- Sources of funding -- What to fund -- Timing of funding -- Funding strategies -- "How much will it cost?" -- References -- Chapter 20: Evaluation of Therapeutic Gardens -- Evaluation -- What We Can Learn from a POE -- Next Steps -- Further Resources -- Research methods -- Examples of indicative POEs -- Examples of diagnostic POEs -- References -- Index
Clare Cooper Marcus is Professor Emerita in the Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. She is recognized internationally for her pioneering research on the psychological and sociological implications of the design of housing, public open space, and restorative landscapes. Naomi A. Sachs is founder and Director of the Therapeutic Landscapes Network. She is currently pursuing a PhD in architecture at Texas A&M University. Naomi writes and lectures frequently about the restorative benefits of nature
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Marcus, Clare Cooper Therapeutic Landscapes : An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing Gardens and Restorative Outdoor Spaces Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2013 9781118231913
Subject Medical geography.;Landscapes -- Therapeutic use.;Landscape architecture -- Therapeutic use.;Evidence-based design
Electronic books
Alt Author Sachs, Naomi A
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