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Author Baker, Patricia A
Title The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World
Imprint New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013
©2013
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (210 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World -- Dedication -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Tables -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Meanings that Lie Beneath the Material Remains -- 1.3 Relevance of Archaeology to Medical History -- 1.4 The Reason for This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- 1.6 Limits of the Text -- 1.7 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Basic Archaeological Textbooks -- Medical History Textbooks for the Ancient World -- Chapter 2 Background to Archaeological Theories and Methods -- 2.1 Defining Medical History and Archaeology -- 2.2 A Modern Example of Meanings Derived from Materials: A Visit to My Doctor's Office -- 2.3 Evolving Archaeological Theory -- 2.3.1 Cultural History -- 2.3.2 Processual Archaeology -- 2.3.3 Postprocessual Archaeology -- 2.4 Introduction to Field Methods -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Chapter 3 Text as Material Culture -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The Need to Study Material Remains -- 3.3 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Historical Period Archaeology -- 3.3.1 Relationship between History and Archaeology -- 3.3.2 The Promotion of Interdisciplinary Approaches -- 3.4 Working with Texts -- 3.5 Textual Sources as Material Culture -- 3.5.1 Who Studies These Textual Remains? -- 3.5.2 Readership -- 3.5.3 Dating and Demography -- 3.5.4 Papyrus and Parchment -- 3.5.5 Wood -- 3.5.6 Stone and Bronze Inscriptions -- 3.5.7 Pottery -- 3.5.8 Collyrium Stamps -- 3.5.9 Lead -- 3.5.10 Writing Materials -- 3.6 Text as Material Culture -- 3.7 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Inscriptions -- Papyri Collections -- Vindolanda Tablets -- Chapter 4 Images -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Art History and Classical Archaeology -- 4.2.1 Roman Art
4.2.2 Art Historical Developments -- 4.3 Anthropology of Art -- 4.4 General Questions to be Addressed of Art Objects -- 4.5 Specific Questions to be Addressed -- 4.5.1 How Was the Image Intended to be Viewed? -- 4.5.2 Ekphrasis -- 4.5.3 Representations of Medical Practitioners and Tools -- 4.5.4 Can Medical Conditions be Identified on Images? -- 4.5.5 Medical Procedures -- 4.5.6 Body Type -- 4.5.7 Regional Attributes of Healing Deities -- 4.5.8 The Image as an Ingredient to Healing -- 4.6 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Numismatic Collections -- Painted Pottery -- Painting -- Sculpture -- Chapter 5 Small Finds -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Defining the Term Artefact -- 5.3 Problems of Classification and Identification -- 5.3.1 Emic and Etic Categories -- 5.3.2 Misidentification -- 5.3.3 The Influence of Archaeological Theories and the Interpretation of Artefacts -- 5.4 The Practice of Collecting Information about Material Culture -- 5.4.1 Setting the Question and Research Parameters -- 5.4.2 Collecting Archaeological Data -- 5.4.3 Creating a Database and a Distribution Map -- 5.5 Interpretations -- 5.5.1 Fabric, Production, and Identity -- 5.5.2 Deposition and Object Meanings -- 5.5.3 Sex and Age -- 5.5.4 The Biography of the Medical Object -- 5.6 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Chapter 6 Healing Spaces -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 What does the Extant Literature Tell Us of Ancient Healing Spaces? -- 6.3 Identifying Sites -- 6.3.1 Establishing Site Names -- 6.3.3 Identifying Structures -- 6.3.3 Step-by-Step Questions to be Addressed When Identifying Buildings: The Case of Abatons -- 6.3.4 Locating Spaces of Treatment Within Buildings -- 6.4 Identifying Attitudes towards Medicine and Hygiene in Spaces -- 6.4.1 Water Supply -- 6.4.2 Concepts of Hygiene in the Baths and Latrines
6.4.3 Views of the Body Found in Baths and Latrines -- 6.4.4 Salubrious Environments -- 6.5 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Chapter 7 Archaeological Science -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The Scientific Division in Archaeology -- 7.3 Bodily Remains -- 7.3.1 Biological Sex -- 7.3.2 Age -- 7.3.3 Stature and General Health -- 7.3.4 Activities -- 7.3.5 Status -- 7.3.6 Diseases -- 7.3.7 Trauma and Surgical Procedures -- 7.3.8 Retrospective Diagnosis -- 7.4 Ancient DNA Analysis -- 7.5 Stable Isotope Analysis -- 7.6 The Environment -- 7.6.1 Ascertaining Past Environments -- 7.6.2 Localized Diets and Living Conditions -- 7.6.3 Disease Vectors -- 7.7 Archaeobotanical Remains and Residue Samples -- 7.8 Metal, Ceramic, and Wood Analysis -- 7.9 Use-wear and Blood Analyses on Tools -- 7.10 Conclusion -- Consideration Questions -- Further Reading -- Chapter 8 Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Primary Sources -- Catalogues Mentioned in the text -- Secondary Sources -- Index
This book teaches students and scholars of Greco-Roman medical history how to use and critically assess archaeological materials
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Baker, Patricia A. The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World New York : Cambridge University Press,c2013 9780521194327
Subject Medicine, Greek and Roman -- History.;Medical archaeology.;Medicine, Ancient
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